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  1. Environmental Strategy, Institutional Force, and Innovation Capability: A Managerial Cognition Perspective.Defeng Yang, Aric Xu Wang, Kevin Zheng Zhou & Wei Jiang - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-15.
    Despite the rising interest in environmental strategies, few studies have examined how managerial cognition of such strategies influences actual innovation capability development. Taking a managerial cognition perspective, this study investigates how managers’ perceptions of institutional pressures relate to their focus on proactive environmental strategy, which in turn affects firms’ realized innovation capability. The findings from a primary survey and three secondary datasets of publicly listed companies in China reveal that managers’ perceived business and social pressures are positively associated with their (...)
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  • CEO Hubris and Firm Pollution: State and Market Contingencies in a Transitional Economy.Lu Zhang, Shenggang Ren, Xiaohong Chen, Dayuan Li & Duanjinyu Yin - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-20.
    This study focuses on CEO hubris and its effect on corporate unethical behaviour—pollution in particular, and in addition examines critical institutional contingencies [state ownership, political connection and industrial competition] which may moderate this effect. With data from over-polluting listed firms based on the real-time pollution monitoring system in transitional China from 2015 to 2017, we find that CEO hubris is significantly positively related to firm pollution, and that the moderating role of SO is not significant, that PC positively moderates the (...)
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  • CSR Reputation and Firm Performance: A Dynamic Approach.Stewart R. Miller, Lorraine Eden & Dan Li - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-18.
    Many countries have regulations that require firms to engage in minimum levels of corporate social activities in areas such as the environment and social welfare. In this paper, we argue that changes in a firm’s compliance with CS regulations are reflected in its reputation for corporate social responsibility, which affects the firm’s performance. The performance impacts depend on whether the firm’s CSR reputation in the current and prior periods is positive, neutral, or negative. Our theoretical framework draws on the reputation (...)
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