Switch to: References

Citations of:

Refiguring the Ordinary

(ed.)
Indiana University Press (2008)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Beyond Education: Meursault and Being Ordinary.Andrew Gibbons - 2013 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (11):1104-1115.
    The infamous story of a young office clerk called Meursault has long entertained literary critics, scholars, musicians, artists and school teachers for the light and shadow that it reveals around and on the human condition. His character has been lauded as existential hero and rebuked as lacking agency. In this article, his story, in Camus’ The outsider, is explored as an educational challenge to a society to reflect on the territory it occupies, and the ways in which the sociopolitical machinery (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Like a Stone: A Happy Death and the Search for Knowledge.Andrew Gibbons - 2013 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (11):1092-1103.
    This article explores the story of ‘the other Mersault’ whose narrative is published in the posthumous and arguably incomplete work A happy death. That this work is incomplete and that it appears to be a precursor to The outsider, has arguably limited scholarly analysis of its character and plot. However, the themes that are explored in A happy death are significant in their distinction to those themes that are experienced by the other, younger, Meursault. In A happy death the world (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Between Embodied Subjects and Objects: Narrative Somaesthetics.Marjorie Jolles - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (2):301-318.
    Michel Foucault's ethics of embodiment, focusing upon care of the self, has motivated feminist scholars to pursue promising models of embodied resistance to disciplinary normalization. Cressida Heyes, in particular, has advocated that these projects adopt practices of “somaesthetics,” following a program of body consciousness developed by Richard Shusterman. In exploring Shusterman's somaesthetics proposal, I find that it does not account for the subjective challenges of resisting normalization. Based on narrative theories of subjectivity, the role narrative plays in normalization, and a (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Bodies and Sensings: On the Uses of Husserlian Phenomenology for Feminist Theory.Alia Al-Saji - 2010 - Continental Philosophy Review 43 (1):13-37.
    What does Husserlian phenomenology have to offer feminist theory? More specifically, can we find resources within Husserl’s account of the living body ( Leib ) for the critical feminist project of rethinking embodiment beyond the dichotomies not only of mind/body but also of subject/object and activity/passivity? This essay begins by explicating the reasons for feminist hesitation with respect to Husserlian phenomenology. I then explore the resources that Husserl’s phenomenology of touch and his account of sensings hold for feminist theory. My (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Sweet Tension and its Phenomenological Description: Sport, Intersubjectivity and Horizon.Douglas W. McLaughlin & Cesar R. Torres - 2011 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 5 (3):270 - 284.
    In this paper, we argue that a rich phenomenological description of ?sweet tension? is an important step to understanding how and why sport is a meaningful human endeavour. We introduce the phenomenological concepts of intersubjectivity and horizon and elaborate how they inform the study and understanding of human experience. In the process, we establish that intersubjectivity is always embodied, developing and ethically committed. Likewise, we establish that our horizons are experienced from an embodied, developing and ethically committed perspective that serves (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Enhancing Evolution:Whose Body? Whose Choice?Kelly Oliver - 2010 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 48 (s1):74-96.
    This essay critically engages the work of John Harris and Jürgen Habermas on the issue of genetic engineering. It does so from the standpoint of women's embodied experience of pregnancy and parenting, challenging the choice–chance binary at work in these accounts.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations