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  1. Understanding the Complex Relationship Between Creativity and Ethical Ideologies.Paul E. Bierly, Robert W. Kolodinsky & Brian J. Charette - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 86 (1):101-112.
    The relationship between individuals’ creativity and their ethical ideologies appears to be complex. Applying Forsyth’s (1980, 1992) personal moral philosophy model which consists of two independent ethical ideology dimensions, idealism and relativism, we hypothesized and found support for a positive relationship between creativity and relativism. It appears that creative people are less likely than non-creative people to follow universal rules in their moral decision making. However, contrary to our hypothesis and the general stereotype that creative people are less caring about (...)
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  • The Development of Responsible and Sustainable Business Practice: Value, Mind-Sets, Business-Models.Mollie Painter, Sally Hibbert & Tim Cooper - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 157 (4):885-891.
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  • Ethics and Behavioural Theory: How Do Professionals Assess Their Mental Models?Frank Jan de Graaf - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 157 (4):933-947.
    The role and ethics of professionals in business and economics have been questioned, especially after the financial crisis of 2008. Some suggest a reorientation using concepts such as craftsmanship. In this article, I will explore professional practices within the context of behavioural theory and business ethics. I suggest that scholars of behavioural theory need a strategy to deal with normative questions to meet their ambition of practical relevance. Evidence-based management, a recent behavioural approach, may assist business ethics scholars in understanding (...)
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  • Exploring the Diversity of Virtues Through the Lens of Moral Imagination: A Qualitative Inquiry Into Organizational Virtues in the Turkish Context.Fahri Karakas, Emine Sarigollu & Selcuk Uygur - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 141 (4):731-744.
    The purpose of this article is to introduce a multidimensional framework based on the concept of moral imagination for analysing and capturing diverse virtues in contemporary Turkish organizations. Based on qualitative interviews with 58 managers in Turkey, this article develops an inventory of Turkish organizational virtues each of which can be associated with a different form of virtuous organizing. The inventory consists of nine forms of moral imagination, which map the multitude of virtues and moral emotions in organizations. Nine emergent (...)
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  • Can Multi-Stakeholder Initiatives Improve Global Supply Chains? Improving Deliberative Capacity with a Stakeholder Orientation.Vivek Soundararajan, Jill A. Brown & Andrew C. Wicks - 2019 - Business Ethics Quarterly 29 (3):385-412.
    ABSTRACT:Global multi-stakeholder initiatives are important instruments that have the potential to improve the social and environmental sustainability of global supply chains. However, they often fail to comprehensively address the needs and interests of various supply-chain participants. While voluntary in nature, MSIs have most often been implemented through coercive approaches, resulting in friction among their participants and in systemic problems with decoupling. Additionally, in those cases in which deliberation was constrained between and amongst participants, collaborative approaches have often failed to materialize. (...)
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  • The Cross-Cultural Evolution of the Subordinate Influence Ethics Measure.David A. Ralston & Allison Pearson - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 96 (1):149 - 168.
    The purpose of our article is to describe the initial development process of the subordinate influence ethics (SIE) measure, an instrument that was crossculturally conceived, designed, and validity tested to measure upward influence ethics strategies of professional subordinates across different societies, as well as within a single society. Development of the SIE began by defining the SIE constructs through theoretical review and empirical (nominal group technique) assessments in Germany, France, Hong Kong, and the U. S. In the present measurement development (...)
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  • The Pluralist Theory of Ethics Programs Orientations and Ideologies: An Empirical Study Anchored in Requisite Variety.Joé T. Martineau, Kevin J. Johnson & Thierry C. Pauchant - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 142 (4):791-815.
    We propose, in this article, a pluralistic theory of ethics programs orientations, empirically derived from the statistical analysis of responses to an ad hoc questionnaire on organizational ethics practices. The results of our research identify six different orientations to ethics programs, corresponding to as many types of organizational ethics practices. This model goes beyond the traditional opposition between a compliance orientation, focused on the regulation of behavior and the detection of deviance, and a values-based orientation, which is said to be (...)
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  • The Pre-Conditions for “Building Capacity” in an Ethics Program.Ann E. Mills & Mary V. Rorty - 2010 - HEC Forum 22 (4):287-297.
    Most organizations and/or their sub-units like ethics programs want to acquire the knowledge, skills and other resources needed to achieve their goals efficiently and effectively. Thus, they want to acquire or develop needed capacity. But there are pre-conditions to building capacity that are often overlooked or forgotten, but which nevertheless, must be in place before capacity can be developed. This essay identifies these pre-conditions and discusses why they are necessary before attempts are made to enhance the capacity of any ethics (...)
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  • The Potential Use of Sociological Perspectives for Business Ethics Teaching.Johannes Brinkmann - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 156 (1):273-287.
    This paper investigates the potential contribution of sociological perspectives for business ethics teaching. After a brief and selective literature review, the paper suggests starting with sociological thinking and three aspects of it: sociological concepts, sociological imagination, and postponed judgment. After presenting two short case teaching stories and three sociological concepts or frameworks, the potential inspiration value of a sociological checklist for analysing or diagnosing business ethics cases is tried out. As an open ending, some short final suggestions are made for (...)
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  • Business Ethics in North America: Trends and Challenges. [REVIEW]Joseph A. Petrick, Wesley Cragg & Martha Sañudo - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 104 (S1):51-62.
    Using 15 years of data (1995–2009) from literature reviews, survey questionnaires, personal interviews, and desktop research, the authors examine North American (Canada, Mexico, and the United States of America) regional trends in business ethics research, teaching and training. The patterns indicate that business ethics continues to flourish in North America with high levels of productivity in both quantity and quality of teaching, training and research publication outputs. Topics/themes that have been covered during the time period are treated with an acknowledgement (...)
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  • Women Leaders in a Globalized World.Patricia H. Werhane - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 74 (4):425-435.
    This article will defend a very simple thesis. In a diverse globalized “flat” world with expanding economic opportunities and risks, we will need to revisit and revise our mindsets about free enterprise, corporate governance, and leadership. That we can change our mindsets and world view is illustrated by studies of primate behavior, and the kind of leadership necessary in a global economy is, interestingly, exemplified by women.
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  • Building Partnerships to Create Social and Economic Value at the Base of the Global Development Pyramid.Jerry M. Calton, Patricia H. Werhane, Laura P. Hartman & David Bevan - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 117 (4):721-733.
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  • Stakeholder Theory and Social Identity: Rethinking Stakeholder Identification. [REVIEW]Andrew Crane & Trish Ruebottom - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 102 (S1):77-87.
    In this article, we propose an adaption to stakeholder theory whereby stakeholders are conceptualized on the basis of their social identity. We begin by offering a critical review of both traditional and more recent developments in stakeholder theory, focusing in particular on the way in which stakeholder categories are identified. By identifying critical weaknesses in the existing approach, as well as important points of strength, we outline an alternative approach that refines our understanding of stakeholders in important ways. To do (...)
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  • A Constructivist Approach to Business Ethics.Michael Buckley - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 117 (4):695-706.
    A recurrent challenge in applied ethics concerns the development of principles that are both suitably general to cover various cases and sufficiently exact to guide behavior in particular instances. In business ethics, two central approaches—stockholder and stakeholder—often fail by one or the other requirement. The author argues that the failure is precipitated by their reliance upon “universal” theory, which views the justification of principles as both independent of their context of application and universally appropriate to all contexts. The author develops (...)
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  • Globalization and Its Challenges for Business and Business Ethics in the Twenty‐First Century.Patricia H. Werhane - 2012 - Business and Society Review 117 (3):383-405.
    The global expansion of free enterprise has been underway for some time, and the challenges for global companies are well‐known. Companies often operate in economically blighted communities and in corrupt environments without a rule of law. At the same time Western‐based global corporations are under increasing public pressure to take on responsibilities to these communities that are often beyond their expertise or economic purview. For example, at the 2008 Davos meetings Bill Gates proposed the idea of “creative capitalism, challenging business (...)
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  • Mid-Management, Employee Engagement, and the Generation of Reliable Sustainable Corporate Social Responsibility.Lynn Godkin - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 130 (1):15-28.
    This paper explains how middle managers might enlist ethically engaged employees into the production of reliable, sustainable CSR. An accompanying model illustrates how those managers can encounter employee engagement in CSR and channel their enthusiasm effectively. It presents factors scaffolding organizational support for employee engagement and how they relate to the intensity of that engagement. It introduces the importance of employee voice and illustrates how associated signals might be captured.
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  • Discerning Possibilities for Action: A Typology of Approaches to Moral Imagination.Timothy J. Hargrave - 2012 - Business and Society Review 117 (3):307-328.
    The existing literature on moral imagination proposes that actors can best respond to ethical dilemmas by tailoring their actions to the practical demands of the situation. It has done little to develop this insight, however. To address this gap, I used institutional theory to identify six ideal type approaches to moral imagination. I proposed that in addressing ethical dilemmas, the morally imaginative actor takes account of two situational factors: first, the social construction of the unmet ethical claim or obligation which (...)
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  • Caring Orientations: The Normative Foundations of the Craft of Management.Matt Statler, Donna Ladkin & Steven Taylor - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 128 (3):575-584.
    In view of the ethical crises that have proliferated over the last decade, scholars have reflected critically on the ideal of management as a value-neutral, objective science. The alternative conceptualization of management as a craft has been introduced but not yet sufficiently elaborated. In particular, although authors such as Mintzberg and MacIntyre suggest craft as an appropriate alternative to science, neither of them systematically describes what “craft” is, and thus how it could inform an ethical managerial orientation. In this paper, (...)
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  • What Makes a Business Ethicist? A Reflection on the Transition From Applied Philosophy to Critical Thinking.Peter Seele - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (3):647-656.
    This article discusses the transition that business ethics has undergone since its start essentially as a philosophical sub-discipline of applied ethics. Today, business ethics—as demonstrated by four examples of gatekeepers—is a well-established field in general management, and increasingly business scholars without a “formal” background in philosophy are entering the scene. I take this transition to examine an updated positioning of business ethics and offer a proposal to redefine what makes a business ethicist. I suggest taking critical thinking as the common (...)
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  • Voluntary Governance Mechanisms in Global Supply Chains: Beyond CSR to a Stakeholder Utility Perspective.Vivek Soundararajan & Jill A. Brown - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 134 (1):83-102.
    Poor working conditions remain a serious problem in supplier facilities in developing countries. While previous research has explored this from the developed buyers’ side, we examine this phenomenon from the perspective of developing countries’ suppliers and subcontractors. Utilizing qualitative data from a major knitwear exporting cluster in India and a stakeholder management lens, we develop a framework that shows how the assumptions of conventional, buyer-driven voluntary governance break down in the dilution of buyer power and in the web of factors (...)
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  • Innovation in Multistakeholder Settings: The Case of a Wicked Issue in Health Care.Edwin Rühli, Sybille Sachs, Ruth Schmitt & Thomas Schneider - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 143 (2):289-305.
    In this article, we offer an approach of how participative stakeholder innovation can be evaluated in complex multistakeholder settings that address wicked issues. Based on the principle of mutual value creation, we present an evaluation framework that accounts for the social interaction process during which stakeholders integrate their resources and capabilities to develop innovative products and services. To assess this evaluation framework, we collected multiple data from the case study of the Swiss Cardiovascular Network, which represents a multistakeholder setting related (...)
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  • The Linguistic Turn, Social Construction and the Impartial Spectator: Why Do These Ideas Matter to Managerial Thinking?Patricia Werhane - 2018 - Philosophy of Management 17 (3):265-278.
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  • Self Constitution as The Foundation for Leading Ethically: A Foucauldian Possibility.Donna Ladkin - 2018 - Business Ethics Quarterly 28 (3):301-323.
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  • Understanding the Complex Relationship Between Creativity and Ethical Ideologies.Paul E. Bierly Iii, Robert W. Kolodinsky & Brian J. Charette - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 86 (1):101 - 112.
    The relationship between individuals' creativity and their ethical ideologies appears to be complex. Applying Forsyth's (1980, 1992) personal moral philosophy model which consists of two independent ethical ideology dimensions, idealism and relativism, we hypothesized and found support for a positive relationship between creativity and relativism. It appears that creative people are less likely than non-creative people to follow universal rules in their moral decision making. However, contrary to our hypothesis and the general stereotype that creative people are less caring about (...)
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  • Culture, Gender, and GMAT Scores: Implications for Corporate Ethics.Raj Aggarwal, Joanne E. Goodell & John W. Goodell - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 123 (1):125-143.
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  • Exploring “Embodied Care” in Relation to Social Sustainability.Sheldene Simola - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 107 (4):473-484.
    Although there has been a proliferation of interest in sustainable business practice, recent research has identified concerns with the relative neglect of the social versus environmental aspects of sustainability. It is argued here that due to its reliance on internally held, concrete and intrinsically motivated forms of responsiveness, as well as its ability to be authentically social versus parochial in nature, that the ethical construct of “embodied care” (Hamington, Embodied Care: Jane Addams, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, and Feminist Ethics, 2004 ) has (...)
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