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  1. Enactive Pain and its Sociocultural Embeddedness.Katsunori Miyahara - forthcoming - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences.
    This paper disputes the theoretical assumptions of mainstream approaches in philosophy of pain, representationalism and imperativism, and advances an enactive approach as an alternative. It begins by identifying three shared assumptions in the mainstream approaches: the internalist assumption, the brain-body assumption, and the semantic assumption. It then articulates an alternative, enactive approach that considers pain as an embodied response to the situation. This approach entails the hypothesis of the sociocultural embeddedness of pain, which states against the brain-body assumption that the (...)
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  • Neuronal Effects of Listening to Entrainment Music Versus Preferred Music in Patients With Chronic Cancer Pain as Measured Via EEG and LORETA Imaging.Andrea McGraw Hunt, Jörg Fachner, Rachel Clark-Vetri, Robert B. Raffa, Carrie Rupnow-Kidd, Clemens Maidhof & Cheryl Dileo - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Previous studies examining EEG and LORETA in patients with chronic pain discovered an overactivation of high theta and low beta power in central regions. MEG studies with healthy subjects correlating evoked nociception ratings and source localization described delta and gamma changes according to two music interventions. Using similar music conditions with chronic pain patients, we examined EEG in response to two different music interventions for pain. To study this process in-depth we conducted a mixed-methods case study approach, based on three (...)
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  • Meditation Reduces Pain-Related Neural Activity in the Anterior Cingulate Cortex, Insula, Secondary Somatosensory Cortex, and Thalamus.Hiroki Nakata, Kiwako Sakamoto & Ryusuke Kakigi - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  • Music Reduces Pain and Increases Resting State Fmri Bold Signal Amplitude in the Left Angular Gyrus in Fibromyalgia Patients.Eduardo A. Garza-Villarreal, Zhiguo Jiang, Peter Vuust, Sarael Alcauter, Lene Vase, Erick H. Pasaye, Roberto Cavazos-Rodriguez, Elvira Brattico, Troels S. Jensen & Fernando A. Barrios - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
  • Repetitive Religious Chanting Modulates the Late-Stage Brain Response to Fear- and Stress-Provoking Pictures.Junling Gao, Jicong Fan, Bonnie W. Wu, Georgios T. Halkias, Maggie Chau, Peter C. Fung, Chunqi Chang, Zhiguo Zhang, Yeung-Sam Hung & Hinhung Sik - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  • Reduced Pain Sensation and Reduced BOLD Signal in Parietofrontal Networks During Religious Prayer.Else-Marie Elmholdt, Joshua Skewes, Martin Dietz, Arne Møller, Martin S. Jensen, Andreas Roepstorff, Katja Wiech & Troels S. Jensen - 2017 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 11.
  • The Placebo Effect: What's Interesting for Scholars of Religion?Anne Harrington - 2011 - Zygon 46 (2):265-280.
    Abstract. The placebo effect these days is no longer merely the insubstantial, subjective response that some patients have to a sham treatment, like a sugar pill. It has been reconceived as a powerful mind-body phenomenon. Because of this, it has also emerged as a complex reference point in a number of high-stakes conversations about the metaphysical significance of experiences of religious healing, the possible health benefits of being religious, and the feasibility of using double-blind placebo-controlled trials to investigate the efficacy (...)
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