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  1. Constitutive Explanations in Neuroeconomics: Principles and a Case Study on Money.Carsten Herrmann-Pillath - 2016 - Journal of Economic Methodology 23 (4):374-395.
    So far, the methodological debate about neuroeconomics rarely refers to original methodological positions in the neurosciences. I confront one of the most influential ones, the constitutive explanations or mechanism approach, with methodological claims that directly relate the economic model of choice with neuronal embodiments, represented by Glimcher’s influential work. Constitutive explanations are composite and non-reductionist, therefore allow for recognizing complex causal interactions between basal neuronal phenomena and cognitive structures, also involving external symbolic media. I demonstrate the power of this methodology (...)
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  • Neural Findings and Economic Models: Why Brains Have Limited Relevance for Economics.Roberto Fumagalli - 2014 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 44 (5):606-629.
    Proponents of neuroeconomics often argue that better knowledge of the human neural architecture enables economists to improve standard models of choice. In their view, these improvements provide compelling reasons to use neural findings in constructing and evaluating economic models. In a recent article, I criticized this view by pointing to the trade-offs between the modeling desiderata valued by neuroeconomists and other economists, respectively. The present article complements my earlier critique by focusing on three modeling desiderata that figure prominently in economic (...)
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  • Carsten Herrmann-Pillath's Foundations of Economic Evolution: A Treatise on the Natural Philosophy of Economics. Edward Elgar, 2013, 704 Pp. [REVIEW]Don Ross - 2014 - Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 7 (1):109.
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  • The Methodologies of Neuroeconomics.Glenn Harrison & Don Ross - 2010 - Journal of Economic Methodology 17 (2):185-196.
    We critically review the methodological practices of two research programs which are jointly called?neuroeconomics?. We defend the first of these, termed?neurocellular economics? by Ross, from an attack on its relevance by Gul and Pesendorfer. This attack arbitrarily singles out some but not all processing variables as unimportant to economics, is insensitive to the realities of empirical theory testing, and ignores the central importance to economics of?ecological rationality?. GP ironically share this last attitude with advocates of?behavioral economics in the scanner?, the (...)
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  • External Validity and Libraries of Phenomena: A Critique of Guala's Methodology of Experimental Economics: Martin K. Jones.Martin K. Jones - 2011 - Economics and Philosophy 27 (3):247-271.
    Francesco Guala has developed some novel and radical ideas on the problem of external validity, a topic that has not received much attention in the experimental economics literature. In this paper I argue that his views on external validity are not justified and the conclusions which he draws from these views, if widely adopted, could substantially undermine the experimental economics enterprise. In rejecting the justification of these views, the paper reaffirms the importance of experiments in economics.
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  • Going Global: Carnap’s Voluntarism and Price’s Expressivism.A. W. Carus - 2018 - The Monist 101 (4):441-467.
    Huw Price has sketched a program for a globalized expressivism in support of which he has repeatedly invoked Rudolf Carnap. This paper argues that this is entirely appropriate, as Carnap had something quite similar in mind. However, it also argues that Price’s recent attempts to integrate Robert Brandom’s inferentialism to this program are less successful, and that a more empirically-oriented descriptive pragmatics along Carnapian lines would be a better fit with his original program than Brandom’s explicitly hermeneutical agenda.
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  • Neuroeconomics: A Rejoinder.Glenn W. Harrison - 2008 - Economics and Philosophy 24 (3):533-544.
    Nobody in this debate questions the point that neuroeconomics remains full of potential, and little else as yet. If so, that really is progress of sorts. I was getting afraid that we would have to open nominations for the Captain Ahab Award for obsessive work on the promotion of neuroeconomics.
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  • On the Surprising Finding That Expected Utility is Literally Computed in the Brain.Jack Vromen - 2010 - Journal of Economic Methodology 17 (1):17-36.
    Advocates of neuroeconomics sometimes argue that one of the most surprising findings in neuroeconomic studies is that expected utilities are literally computed in the brain. This claim is scrutinized closely in the paper. Not surprisingly, the tenability of the claim is shown to depend critically on what is meant by ?literal computation? and ?surprising?. It is argued that the findings do not show that expected utilities are literally computed, if by ?literal computation? we mean a particular kind of mental activity (...)
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