Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. The Nature of the Mādhyamika Trick.C. W. Huntington - 2007 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 35 (2):103-131.
    This paper evaluates several recent efforts to interpret the work of Nāgārjuna through the lens of modern symbolic logic. An attempt is made to uncover the premises that justify the use of symbolic logic for this purpose. This is accomplished through a discussion of (1) the historical origins of those premises in the Indian and Tibetan traditions, and (2) how such assumptions prejudice our understanding of Nāgā rjuna’s insistence that he has no “proposition” (pratijñā). Finally, the paper sets forth an (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • N?G?Rjuna's Appeal.Richard P. Hayes - 1994 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 22 (4):299-378.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • The Commitments of a Madhyamaka Trickster: Innovation in Candrakīrti’s Prasanna-Padā. [REVIEW]Eviatar Shulman - 2010 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 38 (4):379-417.
    This paper challenges the notion that there is a complete continuity between the thought of Nāgārjuna and the thought of Candrakīrti. It is shown that there is strong reason to doubt Candrakīrti’s gloss of Mūla-madhyamaka-kārikā (MMK) 2.1, and that Candrakīrti’s peculiar reading of this verse causes him to alter the context of the discussion in the four cases in which Nāgārjuna quotes MMK 2.1 later in the text—MMK 3.3, 7.14, 10.13 and 16.7. The innovation produced by Candrakīrti is next contrasted (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The Nonduality of Speech and Silence: A Comparative Analysis of Jizang’s Thought on Language and Beyond.Chien-Hsing Ho - 2012 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (1):1-19.
    Jizang (549−623 CE), the key philosophical exponent of the Sanlun tradition of Chinese Buddhism, based his philosophy considerably on his reading of the works of Nāgārjuna (c.150−250 CE), the founder of the Indian Madhyamaka school. However, although Jizang sought to follow Nāgārjuna closely, there are salient features in his thought on language that are notably absent from Nāgārjuna’s works. In this paper, I present a philosophical analysis of Jizang’s views of the relationship between speech and silence and compare them with (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Nägarjuna's Appeal.Richard P. Hayes - 1994 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 22 (4):311.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Nāgārjuna's Critique of Language.Chien-Hsing Ho - 2010 - Asian Philosophy 20 (2):159-174.
    This essay attempts to provide a systematic reconstruction of Nāgārjuna's philosophical thought by understanding it as a critique of the attachment to linguistic expressions and their referents. We first present an outline of Nāgārjuna's philosophy, centering on such notions as 'dependent origination', 'emptiness' and 'self-nature'. Then we discuss Nāgārjuna's dismissal of a metaphysical use of language, particularly his contention that language can function well without assuming the reality of its referents. We also consider his statement that he has no assertion (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The Problem of Prejudice: Some Notes on Philosophical Hermeneutics for Broad-Visioned Buddhologists.Martin T. Adam - 2002 - Contemporary Buddhism 3 (1):31-49.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark