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  1. Experience of Oncology Residents with Death: A Qualitative Study in Mexico.Asunción Álvarez-del-Río, Edwin Ortega-García, Luis Oñate-Ocaña & Ingrid Vargas-Huicochea - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):1-13.
    Background Physicians play a fundamental role in the care of patients at the end of life that includes knowing how to accompany patients, alleviate their suffering and inform them about their situation. However, in reality, doctors are part of this society that is reticent to face death and lack the proper education to manage it in their clinical practice. The objective of this study was to explore the residents’ concepts of death and related aspects, their reactions and actions in situations (...)
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  • Dying Individuals and Suffering Populations: Applying a Population-Level Bioethics Lens to Palliative Care in Humanitarian Contexts: Before, During and After the COVID-19 Pandemic.Keona Jeane Wynne, Mila Petrova & Rachel Coghlan - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (8):514-525.
    BackgroundHumanitarian crises and emergencies, events often marked by high mortality, have until recently excluded palliative care—a specialty focusing on supporting people with serious or terminal illness or those nearing death. In the COVID-19 pandemic, palliative care has received unprecedented levels of societal attention. Unfortunately, this has not been enough to prevent patients dying alone, relatives not being able to say goodbye and palliative care being used instead of intensive care due to resource limitations. Yet global guidance was available. In 2018, (...)
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  • Doctors’ Perceptions of How Resource Limitations Relate to Futility in End-of-Life Decision Making: A Qualitative Analysis.Eliana Close, Ben P. White, Lindy Willmott, Cindy Gallois, Malcolm Parker, Nicholas Graves & Sarah Winch - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (6):373-379.
    ObjectiveTo increase knowledge of how doctors perceive futile treatments and scarcity of resources at the end of life. In particular, their perceptions about whether and how resource limitations influence end-of-life decision making. This study builds on previous work that found some doctors include resource limitations in their understanding of the concept of futility.SettingThree tertiary hospitals in metropolitan Brisbane, Australia.DesignQualitative study using in-depth, semistructured, face-to-face interviews. Ninety-six doctors were interviewed in 11 medical specialties. Transcripts of the interviews were analysed using thematic (...)
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  • Using Best Interests Meetings for People in a Prolonged Disorder of Consciousness to Improve Clinical and Ethical Management.Derick T. Wade - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (5):336-342.
    Current management of people with prolonged disorders of consciousness is failing patients, families and society. The causes include a general lack of concern, knowledge and expertise; a legal and professional framework which impedes timely and appropriate decision-making and/or enactment of the decision; and the exclusive focus on the patient, with no legitimate means to consider the broader consequences of healthcare decisions. This article argues that a clinical pathway based on the principles of the English Mental Capacity Act 2005 and using (...)
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  • Considerations for Introducing Legislation on Advance Decisions in Malaysia.Mark Tan Kiak Min - 2018 - Asian Bioethics Review 10 (1):87-92.
    Despite significant advances in medicine, death remains a certainty for every living human being. End-of-life care decision-making is not made easier in a multi-cultural and multi-religious society like Malaysia. As such, planning for one's death by making Advance Decisions can be immensely valuable as it can help healthcare providers in Malaysia to understand better the preferences and wishes of their patients. However, compared to other countries, there is currently no specific legislation on any form of Advance Decisions in Malaysia despite (...)
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  • Futile Treatment—A Review.Lenko Šarić, Ivana Prkić & Marko Jukić - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (3):329-337.
    The main goal of intensive care medicine is helping patients survive acute threats to their lives, while preserving and restoring life quality. Because of medical advancements, it is now possible to sustain life to an extent that would previously have been difficult to imagine. However, the goals of medicine are not to preserve organ function or physiological activity but to treat and improve the health of a person as a whole. When dealing with medical futilities, physicians and other members of (...)
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  • Should Human Rights and Autonomy Be The Primary Determinants for the Disclosure of a Decision to Withhold Futile Resuscitation?Sarah Cahill - 2019 - The New Bioethics 25 (1):39-59.
    Do not attempt cardiopulmonary resuscitation decisions are considered good medical practice for those dying at the end of natural life. They avoid intrusive and inappropriate intervention. Historically, informing patients of these decisions was discretionary to avoid undue distress. Recent legal rulings have altered clinical guidance: disclosure is now all but obligatory. The basis for these legal judgments was respect for the patient’s autonomy as an expression of their human rights. Through critical analysis, this paper explores other bioethical considerations and the (...)
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