Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Mathematical Expressibility, Perceptual Relativity, and Secondary Qualities.Derk Pereboom - 1991 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 22 (1):63-88.
  • Intrinsic Natures: A Critique of Langton on Kant.Lucy Allais - 2006 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 73 (1):143–169.
    This paper argues that there is an important respect in which Rae Langton's recent interpretation of Kant is correct: Kant's claim that we cannot know things in themselves should be understood as the claim that we cannot know the intrinsic nature of things. However, I dispute Langton's account of intrinsic properties, and therefore her version of what this claim amounts to. Langton's distinction between intrinsic, causally inert properties and causal powers is problematic, both as an interpretation of Kant, and as (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Mills Can't Think: Leibniz's Approach to the Mind-Body Problem.Marleen Rozemond - 2014 - Res Philosophica 91 (1):1-28.
    In the Monadology Leibniz has us imagine a thinking machine the size of a mill in order to show that matter can’t think. The argument is often thought to rely on the unity of consciousness and the notion of simplicity. Leibniz himself did not see matters this way. For him the argument relies on the view that the qualities of a substance must be intimately connected to its nature by being modifications, limitations of its nature. Leibniz thinks perception is not (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Lockean Superaddition and Lockean Humility.Patrick J. Connolly - 2015 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 51:53-61.
    This paper offers a new approach to an old debate about superaddition in Locke. Did Locke claim that some objects have powers that are unrelated to their natures or real essences? The question has split commentators. Some (Wilson, Stuart, Langton) claim the answer is yes and others (Ayers, Downing, Ott) claim the answer is no. This paper argues that both of these positions may be mistaken. I show that Locke embraced a robust epistemic humility. This epistemic humility includes ignorance of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • What Kind of Philosopher Was Locke on Mind and Body?Han-Kyul Kim - 2010 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 91 (2):180-207.
    The wide range of conflicting interpretations that exist in regard to Locke's philosophy of mind and body (i.e. dualistic, materialist, idealistic) can be explained by the general failure of commentators to appreciate the full extent of his nominalism. Although his nominalism that focuses on specific natural kinds has been much discussed, his mind-body nominalism remains largely neglected. This neglect, I shall argue, has given rise to the current diversity of interpretations. This paper offers a solution to this interpretative puzzle, and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Managing Expectations: Locke on the Material Mind and Moral Mediocrity.Catherine Wilson - 2016 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 78:127-146.
    Locke's insistence on the limits of knowledge and the of our epistemological equipment is well understood; it is rightly seen as integrated with his causal theory of ideas and his theory of judgment. Less attention has been paid to the mediocrity theme as it arises in his theory of moral agency. Locke sees definite limits to human willpower. This is in keeping with post-Puritan theology with its new emphasis on divine mercy as opposed to divine justice and recrimination. It also (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Mary Astell: Defender of the "Disembodied Mind".Cynthia B. Bryson - 1998 - Hypatia 13 (4):40 - 62.
    This paper demonstrates how Mary Astell's version of Cartesian dualism supports her disavowal of female subordination and traditional gender roles, her rejection of Locke's notion of "thinking matter" as a major premise for rejecting his political philosophy of "social contracts" between men and women, and, finally, her claim that there is no intrinsic difference between genders in terms of ratiocination, the primary assertion that grants her the title of the first female English feminist.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Lockean Essentialism and the Possibility of Miracles.Nathan Rockwood - 2018 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 56 (2):293-310.
    If the laws of nature are metaphysically necessary, then it appears that miracles are metaphysically impossible. Yet Locke accepts both Essentialism, which takes the laws to be metaphysically necessary, and the possibility of miracles. I argue that the apparent conflict here can be resolved if the laws are by themselves insufficient for guaranteeing the outcome of a particular event. This suggests that, on Locke’s view, the laws of nature entail how an object would behave absent divine intervention. While other views (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • What Kind of Philosopher Was Locke on Mind and Body?K. I. M. Han-kyul - 2010 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 91 (2):180-207.
    The wide range of conflicting interpretations that exist in regard to Locke's philosophy of mind and body (i.e. dualistic, materialist, idealistic) can be explained by the general failure of commentators to appreciate the full extent of his nominalism. Although his nominalism that focuses on specific natural kinds has been much discussed, his mind-body nominalism remains largely neglected. This neglect, I shall argue, has given rise to the current diversity of interpretations. This paper offers a solution to this interpretative puzzle, and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Locke on Real Essences, Intelligibility and Natural Kinds.Jan-Erik Jones - 2010 - Journal of Philosophical Research 35:147-172.
    In this paper I criticize arguments by Pauline Phemister and Matthew Stuart that John Locke's position in his An Essay Concerning Human Understanding allows for natural kinds based on similarities among real essences. On my reading of Locke, not only are similarities among real essences irrelevant to species, but natural kind theories based on them are unintelligible.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Mary Astell: Defender of the “Disembodied Mind”.Cynthia B. Bryson - 1998 - Hypatia 13 (4):40-62.
    This paper demonstrates how Mary Astell's version of Cartesian dualism supports her disavowal of female subordination and traditional gender roles, her rejection of Locke's notion of "thinking matter" as a major premise for rejecting his political philosophy of "social contracts" between men and women, and, finally, her claim that there is no intrinsic difference between genders in terms of ratiocination, the primary assertion that grants her the title of the first female English feminist.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Locke on Active Power and the Obscure Idea of Active Power From Bodies.R. M. Mattern - 1980 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 11 (1):39-77.