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  1. ICU Triage in an Impending Crisis: Uncertainty, Pre-Emption and Preparation.Dominic Wilkinson - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (5):287-288.
    The COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic raises a host of challenging ethical questions at every level of society. However, some of the most acute questions relate to decision making in intensive care. The problem is that a small but significant proportion of patients develop severe viral pneumonitis and respiratory failure. It now seems likely that the number of critically ill patients will overwhelm the capacity of intensive care units within many health systems, including the National Health Service in the UK. The experience (...)
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  • Giving Useful but Not Well-Understood Ideas Their Due.Adam Omelianchuk - 2019 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 44 (6):663-676.
    In this paper, I introduce the ideas to be discussed in the articles of this journal with reference to an imaginary case involving a pregnant woman declared dead on the basis of neurological criteria. I highlight the fact that although these ideas have proved useful for advancing certain claims in bioethical debates, their implications are not always well understood and may complicate our arguments. The ideas to be discussed are an ethic internal to the profession of medicine; the difference between (...)
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  • Conjoined Twins: Philosophical Problems and Ethical Challenges.Julian Savulescu & Ingmar Persson - 2015 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 41 (1):41-55.
    We examine the philosophical and ethical issues associated with conjoined twins and their surgical separation. In cases in which there is an extensive sharing of organs, but nevertheless two distinguishable functioning brains, there are a number of philosophical and ethical challenges. This is because such conjoined twins: 1. give rise to puzzles concerning our identity, about whether we are identical to something psychological or biological;2. force us to decide whether what matters from an ethical point of view is the biological (...)
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  • Lethal Organ Donation: Would the Doctor Intend the Donor’s Death?Ben Bronner - 2019 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 44 (4):442-458.
    Lethal organ donation is a hypothetical procedure in which vital organs are removed from living donors, resulting in their death. An important objection to lethal organ donation is that it would infringe the prohibition on doctors intentionally causing the death of patients. I present a series of arguments intended to undermine this objection. In a case of lethal organ donation, the donor’s death is merely foreseen, and not intended.
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  • How (Not) to Think of the ‘Dead-Donor’ Rule.Adam Omelianchuk - 2018 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 39 (1):1-25.
    Although much has been written on the dead-donor rule in the last twenty-five years, scant attention has been paid to how it should be formulated, what its rationale is, and why it was accepted. The DDR can be formulated in terms of either a Don’t Kill rule or a Death Requirement, the former being historically rooted in absolutist ethics and the latter in a prudential policy aimed at securing trust in the transplant enterprise. I contend that the moral core of (...)
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  • Benefits and Harms to Organ Donors.Hannah Chimowitz & Robert Sade - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (8):19-20.
  • Organ Donation Beyond Brain Death: Donors as Ends and Maximal Utility.Christos Lazaridis & J. S. Blumenthal-Barby - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (8):17-19.
  • Donation After Cardiocirculatory Death: A Call for a Moratorium Pending Full Public Disclosure and Fully Informed Consent.Ari R. Joffe, Joe Carcillo, Natalie Anton, Allan deCaen, Yong Y. Han, Michael J. Bell, Frank A. Maffei, John Sullivan, James Thomas & Gonzalo Garcia-Guerra - 2011 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 6:17.
    Many believe that the ethical problems of donation after cardiocirculatory death (DCD) have been "worked out" and that it is unclear why DCD should be resisted. In this paper we will argue that DCD donors may not yet be dead, and therefore that organ donation during DCD may violate the dead donor rule. We first present a description of the process of DCD and the standard ethical rationale for the practice. We then present our concerns with DCD, including the following: (...)
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  • Withdrawal Aversion as a Useful Heuristic for Critical Care Decisions.Piotr Grzegorz Nowak & Tomasz Żuradzki - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (3):36-38.
    While agreeing with the main conclusion of Dominic Wilkinson and colleagues (Wilkinson, Butcherine, and Savulescu 2019), namely, that there is no moral difference between treatment withholding and withdrawal as such, we wish to criticize their approach on the basis that it treats the widespread acceptance of withdrawal aversion (WA) as a cognitive bias. Wilkinson and colleagues understand WA as “a nonrational preference for withholding (WH) treatment over withdrawal (WD) of treatment” (22). They treat WA as a manifestation of loss aversion (...)
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  • Withdrawal Aversion and the Equivalence Test.Julian Savulescu, Ella Butcherine & Dominic Wilkinson - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (3):21-28.
    If a doctor is trying to decide whether or not to provide a medical treatment, does it matter ethically whether that treatment has already been started? Health professionals sometimes find it harder to stop a treatment than to refrain from starting the treatment. But does that feeling correspond to an ethical difference? In this article, we defend equivalence—the view that withholding and withdrawal of treatment are ethically equivalent when all other factors are equal. We argue that preference for withholding over (...)
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  • Golden Opportunity, Reasonable Risk and Personal Responsibility for Health.Julian Savulescu - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (1):59-61.
    In her excellent and comprehensive article, Friesen argues that utilising personal responsibility in healthcare is problematic in several ways: it is difficult to ascribe responsibility to behaviour; there is a risk of prejudice and bias in deciding which behaviours a person should be held responsible for; it may be ineffective at reducing health costs. In this short commentary, I will elaborate the critique of personal responsibility in health but suggest one way in which it could be used ethically. In doing (...)
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  • Quality Palliative Care or Physician-Assisted Death: A Comment on the French Perspective of End-of-Life Care in Neurological Disorders.Mohamed Y. Rady - 2011 - Journal of Clinical Research and Bioethics 2 (2).
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  • The Case for Kidney Donation Before End-of-Life Care.Paul E. Morrissey - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (6):1-8.
    Donation after cardiac death (DCD) is associated with many problems, including ischemic injury, high rates of delayed allograft function, and frequent organ discard. Furthermore, many potential DCD donors fail to progress to asystole in a manner that would enable safe organ transplantation and no organs are recovered. DCD protocols are based upon the principle that the donor must be declared dead prior to organ recovery. A new protocol is proposed whereby after a donor family agrees to withdrawal of life-sustaining treatments, (...)
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  • Donation, Death, and Harm.Walter Glannon - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (8):48-49.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 8, Page 48-49, August 2011.
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  • Can ‘Best Interests’ Derail the Trolley? Examining Withdrawal of Clinically Assisted Nutrition and Hydration in Patients in the Permanent Vegetative State.Zoe Fritz - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (7):450-454.
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  • Ventilating the Debate: Elective Ventilation Revisited.D. Wilkinson - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (3):127-128.
    This issue of the Journal of Medical Ethics features a special symposium on ‘elective ventilation’ . EV ) was originally described in the 1990s by doctors working in Exeter in the UK.1 At that time there was concern about the large shortfall in organs for transplantation. Patients could become organ donors if they were diagnosed as being brain dead, but this only ever occurred in patients on breathing machines in intensive care who developed signs of brainstem failure. Doctors wondered if (...)
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  • The Moral Insignificance of Death in Organ Donation.Walter Glannon - 2013 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 22 (2):192-202.
  • Living Organ Donation Near and at the End of Life: Drawing and Re-Drawing the Boundaries Around Permissible Practices in Organ Donation.Ana S. Iltis - 2019 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 47 (1):123-125.
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  • Imminent Death Donation: Ethical and Practical Policy Considerations.Jordan Potter - 2018 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 46 (2):524-537.
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