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  1. The Ethics of Resisting Immigration Law.Javier Hidalgo - 2019 - Philosophy Compass 14 (12).
  • The Ethics of Return Migration and Education: Transnational Duties in Migratory Processes.Juan Espindola & Mónica Jacobo-Suárez - 2018 - Journal of Global Ethics 14 (1):54-70.
    ABSTRACTThis paper argues that most prominent normative theories on immigration neglect a critical dimension of the migratory phenomenon, a neglect that blinds them to important rights that, under some circumstances, immigrants ought to have as a matter of justice. Specifically, the paper argues that these theories fail to appreciate that the children of immigrant families, regardless of whether they were born in their parents’ country or in the host country, should benefit from educational rights addressing needs that are particular to (...)
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  • Open Borders and the Ideality of Approaches: An Analysis of Joseph Carens’ Critique of the Conventional View Regarding Immigration.Thomas Pölzler - 2019 - European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 15 (1):17-34.
    Do liberal states have a moral duty to admit immigrants? According to what has been called the “conventional view”, this question is to be answered in the negative. One of the most prominent critics of the conventional view is Joseph Carens. In the past 30 years Carens’ contributions to the open borders debate have gradually taken on a different complexion. This is explained by the varying “ideality” of his approaches. Sometimes Carens attempts to figure out what states would be obliged (...)
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  • The Right to Exclude.Michael Blake - 2014 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 17 (5):521-537.
  • The Ethics of Immigration: Self‐Determination and the Right to Exclude.Sarah Fine - 2013 - Philosophy Compass 8 (3):254-268.
    Many of us take it for granted that states have a right to control the entry and settlement of non‐citizens in their territories, and hardly pause to consider or evaluate the moral justifications for immigration controls. For a long time, very few political philosophers showed a great deal of interest in the subject. However, it is now attracting much more attention in the discipline. This article aims to show that we most certainly should not take it for granted that states (...)
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  • Detaining Immigrants and Asylum Seekers: A Normative Introduction.Stephanie J. Silverman - 2014 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 17 (5):600-617.