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  1. Correlation and Control: William Robert Grove and the Construction of a New Philosophy of Scientific Reform.Iwan Rhys Morus - 1990 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 22 (4):589-621.
  • Mediating Machines.M. Norton Wise - 1988 - Science in Context 2 (1):77-113.
  • The Meaning of “Inhibition” and the Discourse of Order.Roger Smith - 1992 - Science in Context 5 (2):237-263.
  • Making Things Quantitative.Theodore M. Porter - 1994 - Science in Context 7 (3):389-407.
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  • Concepts of Power: Natural Philosophy and the Uses of Machines in Mid-Eighteenth-Century London.Alan Q. Morton - 1995 - British Journal for the History of Science 28 (1):63-78.
    How may scientific research contribute effectively to industrial development? This question has been debated for many years. However, a recent development in this discussion has come from a number of eminent scientists and others who have become concerned with what has become known as the public understanding of science. According to them, a greater understanding of science by members of the public would result in a higher value being placed on scientific research, which, eventually, would result in both increased social (...)
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  • The Calculating Eye: Baily, Herschel, Babbage and the Business of Astronomy.William J. Ashworth - 1994 - British Journal for the History of Science 27 (4):409-441.
    Astronomy does not often appear in the socio-political and economic history of nineteenthcentury Britain. Whereas contemporary literature, poetry and the visual arts made significant reference to the heavens, the more earthbound arena of finance seems an improbable place to encounter astronomical themes. This paper shows that astronomical practice was an important factor in the emergence of what can be described as an accountant's view of the world. I begin by exploring the senses of the term ‘calculation’ in Regency England, and (...)
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  • The Uses of Analogy: James Clerk Maxwell's ‘On Faraday's Lines of Force’ and Early Victorian Analogical Argument.Kevin Lambert - 2011 - British Journal for the History of Science 44 (1):61-88.
    Early Victorian analogical arguments were used to order the natural and the social world by maintaining a coherent collective experience across cultural oppositions such as the ideal and material, the sacred and profane, theory and fact. Maxwell's use of analogical argument in ‘On Faraday's lines of force’ was a contribution to that broad nineteenth-century discussion which overlapped theology and natural philosophy. I argue here that Maxwell understood his theoretical work as both a technical and a socially meaningful practice and that (...)
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  • When is a Physical Concept Born? The Emergence of ‘Work’ as a Magnitude of Mechanics.Nikos Emmanouil Kanderakis - 2010 - Science & Education 19 (10):995-1012.
  • Energy & Empire: A Biographical Study of Lord Kelvin.Iwan Rhys Morus - 1990 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 21 (3):519-525.