Citations of work:

Ludwig Wittgenstein (1922). Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus.

532 found
Order:
Are we missing citations?

PhilPapers citations & references are currently in beta testing. We expect to add many more in the future.

Meanwhile, you can use our bibliography tool to import references for this or another work.

Or you can directly add citations for the above work:

Search for work by author name and title
Add directly by record ID

1 — 50 / 532
  1. Are Propositions Essentially Representational?Bryan Pickel - 2017 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 98 (3).
    Jeffrey King argues that nothing has truth conditions except by being taken to be true or false by rational agents. But – for good reason – King claims that propositions possess truth conditions essentially and intrinsically. I will argue that King cannot have both: if the truth conditions of a proposition depend on the reactions of rational agents, then the possession of truth conditions can't follow from the intrinsic nature or existence of the proposition. This leaves two options. Either, nothing (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2.  52
    Carnapian and Tarskian Semantics.Pierre Wagner - 2017 - Synthese 194 (1):97-119.
    Many papers have been devoted to the semantic turn Carnap took in the late 1930s after Tarski had explained to him his method for defining truth and his work on the establishment of scientific semantics. Commentators have often argued that the major turn in Carnap’s approach to languages had already been taken in the Logical Syntax of Language, but they have usually assumed that Carnap was happy to subsequently follow Tarski and adopt Tarskian semantics. In this paper, it is argued (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  31
    Prior on the Semantics of Modal and Tense Logic.M. Cresswell - 2016 - Synthese 193 (11).
    In celebrating Arthur Prior we celebrate what he gave to the world. Much of this is measured by what others have made of his ideas after his death. The focus of this paper is a little different. It looks at what Prior himself thought he was accomplishing. In particular it considers Prior’s attitude to the semantic metatheory of the logics that he was interested in. The paper sets out some characteristics of the metalogical study of intensional languages in terms of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4.  21
    Two Forms of Exclusion Mean Two Different Negations.Marcos Silva - 2016 - Philosophical Investigations 39 (3):215-236.
    Here, the logical behaviour of negation in Wittgenstein's Tractatus is compared with Demos' account of denial. Even if we hold negation as a pure syntactical device, at least in some context, it brings a handful of complex semantic information – potentially an infinite amount. We advocate then the existence of at least two negations due to the existence of two different and non-reducible types of exclusion. The first negation is a Tractarian and classical one, based on the notion of contradiction, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  96
    Trapping the Metasemantic Metaphilosophical Deflationist?Jared Warren - 2016 - Metaphilosophy 47 (1):108-121.
    Some philosophers are metaphilosophical deflationists for metasemantic reasons. These theorists take standard philosophical assertions to be defective in some manner. There are various versions of metasemantic metaphilosophical deflationism, but a trap awaits any global version of it: metasemantics itself is a part of philosophy, so in deflating philosophy these theorists have thereby deflated the foundation of their deflationism. The present article discusses this issue and the prospects for an adequate response to the trap. Contrary to most historical responses, the article (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  6.  7
    Rationality and the Bayesian Paradigm.Itzhak Gilboa - 2015 - Journal of Economic Methodology 22 (3):312-334.
    It is argued that, contrary to a rather prevalent view within economic theory, rationality does not imply Bayesianism. The note begins by defining these terms and justifying the choice of these definitions, proceeds to survey the main justification for this prevalent view, and concludes by highlighting its weaknesses.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  7. Propositions: Individuation and Invirtuation.Kris McDaniel - 2015 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 93 (4):757-768.
    The pressure to individuate propositions more finely than intensionally—that is, hyper-intensionally—has two distinct sources. One source is the philosophy of mind: one can believe a proposition without believing an intensionally equivalent proposition. The second source is metaphysics: there are intensionally equivalent propositions, such that one proposition is true in virtue of the other but not vice versa. I focus on what our theory of propositions should look like when it's guided by metaphysical concerns about what is true in virtue of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  11
    Reclaiming Paedeia in an Age of Crises: Education and the Necessity of Wisdom.Jānis Tālivaldis Ozoliņš - 2015 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 47 (9):870-882.
    Education needs to prepare students to have understanding of themselves, of their relationships to others, to have an ability to make good moral and other judgements and to act on these. If education has a role to play in the alleviation of the crises facing the world, then there is some urgency in reflecting on what kind of education is needed in order to prepare young people to tackle these many crises. It is our contention that the major problem with (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  9.  60
    Agnostic Hyperintensional Semantics.Carl Pollard - 2015 - Synthese 192 (3):535-562.
    A hyperintensional semantics for natural language is proposed which is agnostic about the question of whether propositions are sets of worlds or worlds are sets of propositions. Montague’s theory of intensional senses is replaced by a weaker theory, written in standard classical higher-order logic, of fine-grained senses which are in a many-to-one correspondence with intensions; Montague’s theory can then be recovered from the proposed theory by identifying the type of propositions with the type of sets of worlds and adding an (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  10.  33
    Beyond Words: Linguistic Experience in Melancholia, Mania, and Schizophrenia. [REVIEW]Louis Sass & Elizabeth Pienkos - 2015 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (3):475-495.
    In this paper, we use a phenomenological approach to compare the unusual ways in which language can be experienced by individuals with schizophrenia or severe mood disorders, specifically mania and melancholia. Our discussion follows a tripartite/dialectical format: first we describe traditionally observed distinctions ; then we consider some apparent similarities in the experience of language in these conditions. Finally, we explore more subtle, qualitative differences. These involve: 1, interpersonal orientation, 2, forms of attention and context-relevance, 3, underlying mutations of experience, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  11.  76
    Exhibiting Interpretational and Representational Validity.Michael Baumgartner - 2014 - Synthese 191 (7).
    A natural language argument may be valid in at least two nonequivalent senses: it may be interpretationally or representationally valid (Etchemendy in The concept of logical consequence. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, 1990). Interpretational and representational validity can both be formally exhibited by classical first-order logic. However, as these two notions of informal validity differ extensionally and first-order logic fixes one determinate extension for the notion of formal validity (or consequence), some arguments must be formalized by unrelated nonequivalent formalizations in order (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12.  3
    Der Anfang, der ein Ende war: Die Gründung der Internationalen Gesellschaft für Religionspsychologie.Jacob A. Belzen - 2014 - Archive for the Psychology of Religion 36 (2):141-171.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Categorial Indeterminacy, Generality and Logical Form in Wittgenstein's Tractatus.Christopher Campbell - 2014 - European Journal of Philosophy 22 (1):138-158.
    Many commentators have attempted to say, more clearly than Wittgenstein did in his Tractatus logico-philosophicus, what sort of things the ‘simple objects’ spoken of in that book are. A minority approach, but in my view the correct one, is to reject all such attempts as misplaced. The Tractarian notion of an object is categorially indeterminate: in contrast with both Frege's and Russell's practice, it is not the logician's task to give a specific categorial account of the internal structure of elementary (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  14. Rethinking Philosophy.Carlo Cellucci - 2014 - Philosophia 42 (2):271-288.
    Can philosophy still be fruitful, and what kind of philosophy can be such? In particular, what kind of philosophy can be legitimized in the face of sciences? The aim of this paper is to answer these questions, listing the characteristics philosophy should have to be fruitful and legitimized in the face of sciences. Since the characteristics in question demand that philosophy search for new knowledge and new rules of discovery, a philosophy with such characteristics may be called the ‘heuristic view’. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  15.  84
    Russell and Wittgenstein on Logical Form and Judgement: What Did Wittgenstein Try That Wouldn't Work?James Connelly - 2014 - Theoria 80 (3):232-254.
    In this article, I pay special expository attention to two pieces of philosophically relevant Wittgenstein–Russell correspondence from the period leading up to the ultimate demise of Russell's Theory of Knowledge manuscript (in June 1913). This is done in the hopes of shedding light on Wittgenstein's notoriously obscure criticisms of Russell's multiple relation theory of judgement. I argue that these two pieces of correspondence (the first, a letter from Wittgenstein to Russell dated January 1913, and the second, a letter from Russell (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  7
    Specifically Human: Going Beyond Perceptual Syntax. [REVIEW]Piera Filippi - 2014 - Biosemiotics 7 (1):111-123.
    The aim of this paper is to help refine the definition of humans as “linguistic animals” in light of a comparative approach on nonhuman animals’ cognitive systems. As Uexküll & Kriszat (1934/1992) have theorized, the epistemic access to each species-specific environment (Umwelt) is driven by different biocognitive processes. Within this conceptual framework, I identify the salient cognitive process that distinguishes each species typical perception of the world as the faculty of language meant in the following operational definition: the ability to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  15
    Fiction Puzzle: Storiable Challenge in Pragmatist Videogame Aesthetics. [REVIEW]Veli-Matti Karhulahti - 2014 - Philosophy and Technology 27 (2):201-220.
    This paper surveys the ontological and aesthetic character of puzzles in worlds with storytelling potential, storiable worlds (potential storyworlds). These puzzles are termed fiction puzzles. The focus is on the fiction puzzles of videogames, which are accommodated to John Dewey's pragmatist framework of aesthetics to be examined as art products capable of producing aesthetic experiences. This leads to an establishing of analytical criteria for estimating the value of fiction puzzles in the pragmatist framework of aesthetics.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  3
    Philosophy of Conceptual Network.Bernard Korzeniewski - 2014 - Open Journal of Philosophy 4 (4):451-491.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  19.  34
    Nominalism and Realism. How Not to Read the Tractatus' Conception of a Name.Daniele Mezzadri - 2014 - Philosophical Investigations 37 (3):208-227.
    This paper focuses on a central aspect of the “picture theory” in the Tractatus – the “identity requirement” – namely the idea that a proposition represents elements in reality as combined in the same way as its elements are combined. After introducing the Tractatus' views on the nature of the proposition, I engage with a “nominalist” interpretation, according to which the Tractatus holds that relations are not named in propositions. I claim that the nominalist account can only be maintained by (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  20.  39
    Reality, Systems and Impure Systems.J. Nescolarde-Selva & J. L. Usó-Doménech - 2014 - Foundations of Science 19 (3):289-306.
    Impure systems contain Objects and Subjects: Subjects are human beings. We can distinguish a person as an observer (subjectively outside the system) and that by definition is the Subject himself, and part of the system. In this case he acquires the category of object. Objects (relative beings) are significances, which are the consequence of perceptual beliefs on the part of the Subject about material or energetic objects (absolute beings) with certain characteristics.The IS (Impure System) approach is as follows: Objects are (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  21.  15
    A Theorical Point of View of Reality, Perception, and Language.Josué Antonio Nescolarde-Selva, Josep-Lluis Usó-Doménech & Hugh Gash - 2014 - Complexity 20 (1):27-37.
  22.  26
    Emergence, Story, and the Challenge of Positive Scenarios.Jay Ogilvy - 2014 - World Futures 70 (1):52-87.
    (2014). Emergence, Story, and the Challenge of Positive Scenarios. World Futures: Vol. 70, Strategy, Story, and Emergence: Essays on Scenario Planning, pp. 52-87.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  23.  34
    Wittgenstein's Lectures on Religious Belief.Stephen Satris - 2014 - Philosophical Investigations 37 (1):18-36.
    In this article, I want to do two things. The first is to conduct a sympathetic yet critical review of some of the salient features of the ideas in the notes that have come to us from Wittgenstein's Lectures on Religious Belief. This requires close reading, analysis and critique. The second, which comes out of the first, is to give some indication of Wittgenstein's failure to apply to his thinking about religious and moral matters some of the insights that he (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  27
    Protest Suicide: A Systematic Model with Heuristic Archetypes.Scott Spehr & John Dixon - 2014 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 44 (3):368-388.
    Suicide as a form of political protest is a little studied social phenomenon that cannot be dismissed simply as being irrational or patholognomic. We consider protest suicide to be a meaningful social action as purposive political act intended to change oppressive policies or practices. This paper synthesizes theoretical propositions associated with suicide in general, and protest suicide in particular, so as to construct a general explanatory model of protest suicide as a social phenomenon. Then, it analyzes protest suicide as a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  15
    Wittgenstein for Adolescents? Post-Foundational Epistemology in High School Philosophy.Jeff A. Stickney - 2014 - Ethics and Education 9 (2):201-219.
    Drawing on experience teaching secondary philosophy students, I investigate meaningful engagement with Wittgenstein in a Grade 12 epistemology unit. The premise is that without some introduction to landmark philosophers of the early twentieth century, students are left out of many contemporary philosophical conversations: linguistic idealism or relativism, and nominalism versus realism. Wanting to share with students Foucault, Rorty, and Hacking, I need expedient avenues of approach. Using Wittgenstein's methods I offer practical, ‘shallow grounds’ for an eclectic syllabus conveying post-foundational epistemology, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  89
    “It is Not a Something, but Not a Nothing Either!”—McDowell on Wittgenstein.Hao Tang - 2014 - Synthese 191 (3):557-567.
    This paper corrects a mistake in John McDowell’s influential reading of Wittgenstein’s attack on the idea of private sensations. McDowell rightly identifies a primary target of Wittgenstein’s attack to be the Myth of the Given. But he also suggests that Wittgenstein, in the ferocity of his battles with this myth, sometimes goes into overkill, which manifests itself in seemingly behavioristic denials about sensations. But this criticism of Wittgenstein is a mistake. The mistake is made over two important but notoriously difficult (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  27.  31
    Eliminating Identity: A Reply to Wehmeier.Robert Trueman - 2014 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 92 (1):1-8.
    Wehmeier [2012] argues that identity is a problematic relation and that we can eliminate all mention of it. In this note I show, to the contrary, that if identity is problematic then Wehmeier has not given us the means to dispense with it.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  28.  93
    Nonsense and Illusions of Thought.Herman Cappelen - 2013 - Philosophical Perspectives 27 (1):22-50.
    This paper addresses four issues: 1. What is nonsense? 2. Is nonsense possible? 3. Is nonsense actual? 4. Why do the answers to (1)–(3) matter, if at all? These are my answers: 1. A sentence (or an utterance of one) is nonsense if it fails to have or express content (more on ‘express’, ‘have’, and ‘content’ below). This is a version of a view that can be found in Carnap (1959), Ayer (1936), and, maybe, the early Wittgenstein (1922). The notion (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  29.  49
    What Is Wrong with Hacker's Wittgenstein? On Grammar, Context and Sense‐Determination.Tamara Dobler - 2013 - Philosophical Investigations 36 (3):231-250.
    Peter Hacker defends an interpretation of the later Wittgenstein's notion of grammar, according to which the inherently general grammatical rules are sufficient for sense-determination. My aim is to show that this interpretation fails to account for an important contextualist shift in Wittgenstein's views on sense-determination. I argue that Hacker attributes to the later Wittgenstein a rule-based, combinatorial account of sense, which Wittgenstein puts forward in the Tractatus. I propose that this is not how we should interpret the later Wittgenstein because (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  30.  43
    Wittgenstein's “Most Fruitful Ideas” and Sraffa.Mauro Luiz Engelmann - 2013 - Philosophical Investigations 36 (2):155-178.
    In the preface of the Philosophical Investigations, Wittgenstein says that his “most fruitful ideas” are due to the stimulus of Sraffa's criticism, but Sraffa is not mentioned anywhere else in the book. It remains a puzzle in the literature how and why Sraffa influenced Wittgenstein. This paper presents a solution to this puzzle. Sraffa's criticism led Wittgenstein away from the calculus conception of language of the Big Typescript (arguably, an adaptation of the calculus of the Tractatus), and towards the “anthropological (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  31.  23
    Only Connect.Richard Ennals - 2013 - AI and Society 28 (2):219-225.
    It is supposedly easier to connect with other human beings in the era of ubiquitous technology. Connecting requires action and an element of risk taking in a context of dynamic uncertainty and incomplete information. The article explores what is involved in developing sustainable connections. We reflect on the context of “Socially Useful Artificial Intelligence”, the focus of the first article in issue 1.1.1987 of AI & Society, and explore subsequent research in a changing world. The arguments are illustrated through an (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  14
    Testing Turing: A Personal Quest. [REVIEW]Richard Ennals - 2013 - AI and Society 28 (4):541-547.
  33.  4
    Why the Tractatus, Like the Old Testament, is 'Nothing but a Book'.K. L. Evans - 2013 - Philosophy 88 (2):267-298.
    In The Education of the Human Race, G. E. Lessing helps his readers understand why the propositions of the Old Testament are pseudo-propositions, or why they do not resemble the significant propositions of natural science but the tautological propositions of mathematics and of logic. That is, the so-called propositions of the Old Testament do not teach readers whether what actually happens is this or that; rather what they teach us is to imagine expressions by substitution in such a way as (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  21
    Practising Silence in Teaching.Michelle Forrest - 2013 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 47 (4):605-622.
    The concept ‘silence’ has diametrically opposed meanings; it connotes peace and contemplation as well as death and oblivion. Silence can also be considered a practice. There is keeping the rule of silence to still the mind and find inner truth, as well as forcibly silencing in the sense of subjugating another to one's own purposes. The concept of teaching runs the gamut between these extremes, from respectfully leading students to search and discover, to relentlessly bending them to one's own will. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  35.  17
    On the Origin of Ambiguity in Efficient Communication.Jordi Fortuny & Bernat Corominas-Murtra - 2013 - Journal of Logic, Language and Information 22 (3):249-267.
    This article studies the emergence of ambiguity in communication through the concept of logical irreversibility and within the framework of Shannon’s information theory. This leads us to a precise and general expression of the intuition behind Zipf’s vocabulary balance in terms of a symmetry equation between the complexities of the coding and the decoding processes that imposes an unavoidable amount of logical uncertainty in natural communication. Accordingly, the emergence of irreversible computations is required if the complexities of the coding and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  43
    Reach's Puzzle and Mention.Richard Gaskin & Daniel J. Hill - 2013 - Dialectica 67 (2):201-222.
    We analyse Reach's puzzle, according to which it is impossible to be told anyone's name, because the statement conveying it can be understood only by someone who already knows what it says. We argue that the puzzle can be solved by adverting to the systematic nature of mention when it involves the use of standard quotation marks or similar devices. We then discuss mention more generally and outline an account according to which any mentioning expressions that are competent to solve (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  37.  39
    We Are Not All 'Self‐Blind': A Defense of a Modest Introspectionism.R. E. Y. Georges - 2013 - Mind and Language 28 (3):259-285.
    Shoemaker (1996) presented a priori arguments against the possibility of ‘self-blindness’, or the inability of someone, otherwise intelligent and possessed of mental concepts, to introspect any of her concurrent attitude states. Ironically enough, this seems to be a position that Gopnik (1993) and Carruthers (2006, 2008, 2009a,b) have proposed as not only possible, but as the actual human condition generally! According to this ‘Objectivist’ view, supposed introspection of one's attitudes is not ‘direct’, but an ‘inference’ of precisely the sort we (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  38.  28
    On the Unintelligibility of Wittgenstein's Tractatus.Cameron Hessell - 2013 - Philosophical Investigations 36 (2):113-154.
    “Resolute” readings of Wittgenstein's Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus maintain that the book is divided into two parts: an intelligible “frame” and an unintelligible “body.” This article questions the validity of the “frame/body distinction” and, by extension, the resolute reading itself. It first establishes the tenability of the resolute programme as entirely dependent upon such a frame/body distinction. It then explores three possible ways the claim that the Tractatus contains such a distinction might be grounded, arguing in each case why it cannot do (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  15
    Ascriptions of Propositional Attitudes. An Analysis in Terms of Intentional Objects.Hans-Ulrich Hoche & Michael Knoop - 2013 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (4):747-768.
    Having briefly sketched the aims of our paper, namely, to logically analyse the ascription of propositional attitudes to somebody else in terms, not of Fregean senses or of intensions-with-s, but of the intentional object of the person spoken about, say, the believer or intender (Section 1), we try to introduce the concept of an intentional object as simply as possible, to wit, as coming into view whenever two (or more) subjective belief-worlds strikingly diverge (Section 2). Then, we assess the pros (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  72
    Judgment and the Identity Theory of Truth.Colin Johnston - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 166 (2):381-397.
    The identity theory of truth takes on different forms depending on whether it is combined with a dual relation or a multiple relation theory of judgment. This paper argues that there are two significant problems for the dual relation identity theorist regarding thought’s answerability to reality, neither of which takes a grip on the multiple relation identity theory.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  41.  19
    The Emergence of Logical Formalization in the Philosophy of Religion: Genesis, Crisis, and Rehabilitation.Anders Kraal - 2013 - History and Philosophy of Logic 34 (4):351 - 366.
    The paper offers a historical survey of the emergence of logical formalization in twentieth-century analytically oriented philosophy of religion. This development is taken to have passed through three main ?stages?: a pioneering stage in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries (led by Frege and Russell), a stage of crisis in the 1920s and early 1930s (occasioned by Wittgenstein, logical positivists such as Carnap, and neo-Thomists such as Maritain), and a stage of rehabilitation in the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s (led (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  16
    International Language and the Everyday: Contact and Collaboration Between C.K. Ogden, Rudolf Carnap and Otto Neurath.James McElvenny - 2013 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (6):1194-1218.
    Although now largely forgotten, the international language movement was, from the 1880s to the end of the Second World War, a matter of widespread public interest, as well as a concern of numerous scientists and scholars. The primary goal was to establish a language for international communication, but in the early twentieth century an increasing accent was placed on philosophical considerations: wanted was a language better suited to the needs of modern science and rational thought. In this paper, we examine (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  7
    Wittgenstein's Early Philosophy, Edited by Zalabardo, José L.Michael Morris - 2013 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 91 (3):620 - 623.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  36
    Beyond Hacker's Wittgenstein: Discussion of HACKER, Peter (2012) “Wittgenstein on Grammar, Theses and Dogmatism” Philosophical Investigations 35:1, January 2012, 1–17. [REVIEW]Danièle Moyal‐Sharrock - 2013 - Philosophical Investigations 36 (4):355-380.
    In “Wittgenstein on Grammar, Theses and Dogmatism,” Peter Hacker addresses what he takes to be misconceptions of Wittgenstein's philosophy with respect to (1) the periodisation of his thought and to what should properly be counted as part of his work; (2) his conception of grammar since the Big Typescript (1929–33); and (3) his conception of philosophy as grammatical investigation. I argue that Hacker's restrictive conception of what ought to be considered part of Wittgenstein's philosophy and his conservative view of Wittgensteinian (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  45.  61
    Criteria for Logical Formalization.Jaroslav Peregrin & Vladimír Svoboda - 2013 - Synthese 190 (14):2897-2924.
    The article addresses two closely related questions: What are the criteria of adequacy of logical formalization of natural language arguments, and what gives logic the authority to decide which arguments are good and which are bad? Our point of departure is the criticism of the conception of logical formalization put forth, in a recent paper, by M. Baumgartner and T. Lampert. We argue that their account of formalization as a kind of semantic analysis brings about more problems than it solves. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  46.  52
    Russell on Incomplete Symbols.Bryan Pickel - 2013 - Philosophy Compass 8 (10):909-923.
    Russell's notion of an incomplete symbol has become a standard against which philosophers compare their views on the relationship between language and the world. But Russell's exact characterization of incomplete symbols and the role they play in his philosophy are still disputed. In this paper, I trace the development of the notion of an incomplete symbol in Russell's philosophy. I suggest – against Kaplan, Evans, and others – that Russell's many characterizations of the notion of an incomplete symbol are compatible. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  47.  20
    Psyches Therapeia: Therapeutic Dimensions in Heidegger and Wittgenstein.Robert Sanchez Jr & Robert Stolorow - 2013 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 5 (1):67-80.
    This article explores the philosophies of Heidegger and Wittgenstein to illustrate the thesis that philosophy is a human activity exhibiting a unity of investigative and therapeutic aims. For both philosophers, the purpose of philosophical concepts is to point toward a path of transformation rather than to explain. For both, a first step on this path is the recognition of constraining illusions, whether conventional or metaphysical. For both, such illusions are sedimented in linguistic practices, and for both, philosophical investigation is a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. Truth, Paradox, and Ineffable Propositions.James R. Shaw - 2013 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 86 (1):64-104.
    I argue that on very weak assumptions about truth (in particular, that there are coherent norms governing the use of "true"), there is a proposition absolutely inexpressible with conventional language, or something very close. I argue for this claim "constructively": I use a variant of the Berry Paradox to reveal a particular thought for my readership to entertain that very strongly resists conventional expression. I gauge the severity of this expressive limitation within a taxonomy of expressive failures, and argue that (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  49.  23
    Dōgen and Wittgenstein: Transcending Language Through Ethical Practice.Laura Specker Sullivan - 2013 - Asian Philosophy 23 (3):1-15.
    While there have been numerous claims of a resemblance between the philosophy of Ludwig Wittgenstein and Zen Buddhism, few studies of the philosophy of Wittgenstein in detailed comparison with specific Zen thinkers have emerged. This paper attempts to fill this gap by considering Wittgenstein’s philosophy in relation to that of Eihei Dōgen, founder of the Sōtō school of Zen. Points of particular confluence are found in both thinkers’ approaches to language, experience, and practice. Through an elucidation of these points, this (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  50. Norms and Necessity.Amie L. Thomasson - 2013 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 51 (2):143-160.
    Modality presents notorious philosophical problems, including the epistemic problem of how we could come to know modal facts and metaphysical problems about how to place modal facts in the natural world. These problems arise from thinking of modal claims as attempts to describe modal features of this world that explain what makes them true. Here I propose a different view of modal discourse in which talk about what is “metaphysically necessary” does not aim to describe modal features of the world, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
1 — 50 / 532