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Phillip Wolff, Douglas L. Medin & Connie Pankratz (1999). Evolution and Devolution of Folkbiological Knowledge.

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  1.  9
    Bringing History Back to Culture: On the Missing Diachronic Component in the Research on Culture and Cognition.Rumen I. Iliev & Bethany L. Ojalehto - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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    How Can You Capture Cultural Dynamics?Yoshihisa Kashima - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  3. Maya Folk Botany and Knowledge Devolution: Modernization and Intra-Community Variability in the Acquisition of Folkbotanical Knowledge.Jeffrey Shenton, Norbert Ross, Michael Kohut & Sandra Waxman - 2011 - Ethos 39 (3):349-367.
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    The Native Mind: Biological Categorization and Reasoning in Development and Across Cultures.Douglas L. Medin & Scott Atran - 2004 - Psychological Review 111 (4):960-983.
    . This paper describes a cross-cultural and developmental research project on naïve or folk biology, that is, the study of how people conceptualize nature. The combination of domain specificity and cross-cultural comparison brings a new perspective to theories of categorization and reasoning and undermines the tendency to focus on “standard populations.” From the standpoint of mainstream cognitive psychology, we find that results gathered from standard populations in industrialized societies often fail to generalize to humanity at large. For example, similarity-driven typicality (...)
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    Thinking About Biology. Modular Constraints on Categorization and Reasoning in the Everyday Life of Americans, Maya, and Scientists.Scott Atran, Douglas I. Medin & Norbert Ross - 2002 - Mind and Society 3 (2):31-63.
    This essay explores the universal cognitive bases of biological taxonomy and taxonomic inference using cross-cultural experimental work with urbanized Americans and forest-dwelling Maya Indians. A universal, essentialist appreciation of generic species appears as the causal foundation for the taxonomic arrangement of biodiversity, and for inference about the distribution of causally-related properties that underlie biodiversity. Universal folkbiological taxonomy is domain-specific: its structure does not spontaneously or invariably arise in other cognitive domains, like substances, artifacts or persons. It is plausibly an innately-determined (...)
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