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  1. Does the Neuroscience Research on Early Stress Justify Responsive Childcare? Examining Interwoven Epistemological and Ethical Challenges.Bruce Maxwell & Eric Racine - 2012 - Neuroethics 5 (2):159-172.
    This paper examines interwoven ethical and epistemological issues raised by attempts to promote responsive childcare practices based on neuroscience evidence on the developmental effects of early stress. The first section presents this “neuroscience argument for responsive early childcare”. The second section introduces some evidential challenges posed by the use of evidence from developmental neuroscience as grounds for parental practice recommendations and then advances a set of observations about the limitations of the evidence typically cited. Section three highlights the ethical implications (...)
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  • Recognizing Criminal Behavior of Persons Diagnosed with Mental Illness: An Analysis on the Intentionality and a Philosophical Disclosure on Ethics and Morality.Tang B. - 2015 - Journal of Clinical Research and Bioethics 6 (5).
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  • Authority, Autonomy and Automation: The Irreducibility of Pedagogy to Information Transactions.David Lundie - 2016 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 35 (3):279-291.
    This paper draws attention to the tendency of a range of technologies to reduce pedagogical interactions to a series of datafied transactions of information. This is problematic because such transactions are always by definition reducible to finite possibilities. As the ability to gather and analyse data becomes increasingly fine-grained, the threat that these datafied approaches over-determine the pedagogical space increases. Drawing on the work of Hegel, as interpreted by twentieth century French radical philosopher Alexandre Kojève, this paper develops a model (...)
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  • The Givenness of the Human Learning Experience and Its Incompatibility with Information Analytics.David Lundie - 2017 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 49 (4).
    The rise of learning analytics, the application of complex metrics developed to exploit the proliferation of ‘Big Data’ in educational work, raises important moral questions about the nature of what is measurable in education. Teachers, schools and nations are increasingly held to account based on metrics, exacerbating the tendency for fine-grained measurement of learning experiences. In this article, the origins of learning analytics ontology are explored, drawing upon core ideas in the philosophy of computing, such as the general definition of (...)
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  • Can We Scan For Truth in a Society of Liars?Tom Buller - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (2):58-60.
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  • The Orwellian Threat to Emerging Neurodiagnostic Technologies.Joseph J. Fins - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (2):56-58.
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  • The Brain Doesn't Lie.Ruth L. Fischbach & Gerald D. Fischbach - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (2):54-55.
  • Children in Non-Clinical Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Fmri) Studies Give the Scan Experience a “Thumbs Up”.Moriah E. Thomason - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (1):25 – 27.
  • Ethical Challenges and Interpretive Difficulties with Non-Clinical Applications of Pediatric fMRI.Andrew Fenton, Letitia Meynell & Françoise Baylis - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (1):3-13.
    In this article, we critically examine some of the ethical challenges and interpretive difficulties with possible future non-clinical applications of pediatric fMRI with a particular focus on applications in the classroom and the courtroom - two domains in which children come directly in contact with the state. We begin with a general overview of anticipated clinical and non-clinical applications of pediatric fMRI. This is followed by a detailed analysis of a range of ethical challenges and interpretive difficulties that trouble the (...)
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  • Enthusiasm for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Fmri) Often Overlooks its Dependence on Task Selection and Performance.Emily Bell & Eric Racine - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (1):23 – 25.
  • Ethical Intelligence From Neuroscience: Is It Possible?John Lunstroth & Jan Goldman - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (5):18 – 20.
  • Neuroethics and Human Rights.Luis Justo & Fabiana Erazun - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (5):16 – 18.
  • Neuroethics and National Security.Turhan Canli, Susan Brandon, William Casebeer, Philip J. Crowley, Don DuRousseau, Henry T. Greely & Alvaro Pascual-Leone - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (5):3 – 13.
  • Brain Imaging and Privacy.Juha Räikkä - 2010 - Neuroethics 3 (1):5-12.
    I will argue that the fairly common assumption that brain imaging may compromise people’s privacy in an undesirable way only if moral crimes are committed is false. Sometimes persons’ privacy is compromised because of failures of privacy. A normal emotional reaction to failures of privacy is embarrassment and shame, not moral resentment like in the cases of violations of right to privacy. I will claim that if (1) neuroimaging will provide all kinds of information about persons’ inner life and not (...)
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  • Neuroscience, Neuropolitics and Neuroethics: The Complex Case of Crime, Deception and fMRI.Stuart Henry & Dena Plemmons - 2012 - Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (3):573-591.
    Scientific developments take place in a socio-political context but scientists often ignore the ways their innovations will be both interpreted by the media and used by policy makers. In the rush to neuroscientific discovery important questions are overlooked, such as the ways: (1) the brain, environment and behavior are related; (2) biological changes are mediated by social organization; (3) institutional bias in the application of technical procedures ignores race, class and gender dimensions of society; (4) knowledge is used to the (...)
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  • Human Enhancement and Communication: On Meaning and Shared Understanding.Laura Cabrera & John Weckert - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):1039-1056.
    Our technologies have enabled us to change both the world and our perceptions of the world, as well as to change ourselves and to find new ways to fulfil the human desire for improvement and for having new capacities. The debate around using technology for human enhancement has already raised many ethical concerns, however little research has been done in how human enhancement can affect human communication. The purpose of this paper is to explore whether some human enhancements could change (...)
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  • The Lie of Fmri: An Examination of the Ethics of a Market in Lie Detection Using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. [REVIEW]Amy E. White - 2010 - HEC Forum 22 (3):253-266.
    In this paper, I argue that companies who use functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) scans for lie detection encounter the same basic ethical stumbling blocks as commercial companies that market traditional polygraphs. Markets in traditional voluntary polygraphs are common and fail to elicit much uproar among ethicists. Thus, for consistency, if markets in polygraphs are ethically unproblematic, markets using fMRIs for lie detection are equally as acceptable. Furthermore, while I acknowledge two substantial differences between the ethical concerns involving polygraphs and (...)
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  • Ethical Questions in Functional Neuroimaging and Cognitive Enhancement.Danielle C. Turner & Barbara J. Sahakian - 2006 - Poiesis and Praxis 4 (2):81-94.
    The new field of neuroethics has recently emerged following unprecedented developments in the neurosciences. Neuroimaging and cognitive enhancement in particular are demanding ethical debate. For example, neuroscientists are able to measure, with increasing accuracy, intimate personal biases and thoughts as they occur in the brain. Smart drugs are now available that can effectively and safely enhance mental functioning in both healthy and clinical populations. This article describes the scientific principles behind these technologies, and urges the development of ethical principles based (...)
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  • The Body in Medical Imaging Between Reality and Construction.Britta Schinzel - 2006 - Poiesis and Praxis 4 (3):185-198.
    Medical imaging has provided insight into the living body that were not possible beforehand. With these methods a revolution in medical diagnosis and biomedical research has begun. Problematic aspects on the other hand are arising from the highly constructive properties of image production, which use complicated physical and physiological effects. Images are established via highly complicated combinations of technology and contingently chosen mathematical and algorithmic solutions. In addition, image construction follows properties of the human visual and cognitive system to allow (...)
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  • Dimensions of Ethical Direct-to-Consumer Neurotechnologies.Karola V. Kreitmair - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (4):152-166.
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  • Neuroethics: A New Way to Do Ethics or a New Understanding of Ethics?Laura Cabrera - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 2 (2):25-26.
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  • Emerging Neurotechnologies for Lie-Detection: Where Are We Now? An Appraisal of Wolpe, Foster and Langleben's “Emerging Neurotechnologies for Lie-Detection: Promise and Perils” Five Years Later.Steven E. Hyman - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (10):49-50.
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  • Emerging Neurotechnologies for Lie-Detection: Promises and Perils.Daniel D. Langleben, Kenneth R. Foster & Paul Root Wolpe - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (10):40-48.
    Detection of deception and confirmation of truth telling with conventional polygraphy raised a host of technical and ethical issues. Recently, newer methods of recording electromagnetic signals from the brain show promise in permitting the detection of deception or truth telling. Some are even being promoted as more accurate than conventional polygraphy. While the new technologies raise issues of personal privacy, acceptable forensic application, and other social issues, the focus of this paper is the technical limitations of the developing technology. Those (...)
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  • On the Need for a Right to Cognitive Privacy.Kyle Slominski - 2018 - Oxford Philosophical Society Annual Review 40:43-45.
    This paper argues that legal privacy should be afforded to the content of the mind, comparing cognitive privacy to other protected forms of privacy and briefly addressing the potential pitfalls of compulsory neuroimaging.
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  • ‘Screen and Intervene’: Governing Risky Brains.Nikolas Rose - 2010 - History of the Human Sciences 23 (1):79-105.
    This article argues that a new diagram is emerging in the criminal justice system as it encounters developments in the neurosciences. This does not take the form that concerns many ‘neuroethicists’ — it does not entail a challenge to doctrines of free will and the notion of the autonomous legal subject — but is developing around the themes of susceptibility, risk, pre-emption and precaution. I term this diagram ‘screen and intervene’ and in this article I attempt to trace out this (...)
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  • Images and Emotion in Abortion Debates.Catherine Mills - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (12):61-62.
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  • The Persuasive Power of Brain Scan Images.Carl Senior - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (12):60 – 61.
  • Neuroimaging Techniques for Memory Detection: Scientific, Ethical, and Legal Issues.Daniel V. Meegan - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (1):9 – 20.
    There is considerable interest in the use of neuroimaging techniques for forensic purposes. Memory detection techniques, including the well-publicized Brain Fingerprinting technique (Brain Fingerprinting Laboratories, Inc., Seattle WA), exploit the fact that the brain responds differently to sensory stimuli to which it has been exposed before. When a stimulus is specifically associated with a crime, the resulting brain activity should differentiate between someone who was present at the crime and someone who was not. This article reviews the scientific literature on (...)
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  • Neuroimaging Techniques for Memory Detection: Scientific, Ethical, and Legal Issues.Johanna C. van Hooff - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (1):25 – 26.
  • Functional Neuroimaging and the Law: Trends and Directions for Future Scholarship.Stacey A. Tovino - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (9):44 – 56.
    Under the umbrella of the burgeoning neurotransdisciplines, scholars are using the principles and research methodologies of their primary and secondary fields to examine developments in neuroimaging, neuromodulation and psychopharmacology. The path for advanced scholarship at the intersection of law and neuroscience may clear if work across the disciplines is collected and reviewed and outstanding and debated issues are identified and clarified. In this article, I organize, examine and refine a narrow class of the burgeoning neurotransdiscipline scholarship; that is, scholarship at (...)
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  • Ethical Issues to Consider Before Introducing Neurotechnological Thought Apprehension in Psychiatry.Gerben Meynen - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (1):5-14.
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  • Military Medical Ethics.Michael L. Gross - 2013 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 22 (1):92-109.
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  • Don't Forget Memory's Costs.Ronald A. Lindsay - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 1 (3):35-37.
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  • The Prospects for Neuro-Exceptionalism: Transparent Lies, Naked Minds.Robert Wachbroit - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (1):3 – 8.
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  • The Confidentiality and Privacy Implications of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging.Stacey A. Tovino - 2005 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (4):844-850.
  • The Detection of Constructed Memories and the Risks of Undue Prejudice.Daniel Goldberg - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (1):23 – 25.
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  • The Puzzle of Neuroimaging and Psychiatric Diagnosis: Technology and Nosology in an Evolving Discipline.Martha J. Farah & Seth J. Gillihan - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 3 (4):31-41.
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  • To ELSI or Not to ELSI Neuroscience: Lessons for Neuroethics From the Human Genome Project.Eran Klein - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 1 (4):3-8.
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  • Stimulating Eyewitness Testimony: Not Even Neuroscience Can Just Stick to the Facts.Robin Nunn - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 1 (3):44-46.
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  • Human Enhancement for the Common Good—Using Neurotechnologies to Improve Eyewitness Memory.Anton Vedder & Laura Klaming - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 1 (3):22-33.
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  • A Neuroskeptic's Guide to Neuroethics and National Security.Jonathan H. Marks - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 1 (2):4-12.
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  • The Confidentiality and Privacy Implications of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging.Stacey A. Tovino - 2005 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (4):844-850.
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  • Searching the Brain: The Fourth Amendment Implications of Brain-Based Deception Detection Devices.Richard G. Boire - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (2):62-63.
  • Spy Versus Spy.Ronald M. Green - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (2):53-54.
  • Dual Use and the “Moral Taint” Problem.Jonathan David Moreno - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (2):52-53.
  • Premarket Approval Regulation for Lie Detections: An Idea Whose Time May Be Coming.Henry T. Greely - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (2):50-52.
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  • Keeping an Open Mind: What Legal Safeguards Are Needed?Linda MacDonald Glenn - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (2):60-61.
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