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  1. Mendel the Fraud? A Social History of Truth in Genetics.Gregory Radick - 2022 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 93:39-46.
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  • James V. Neel and Yuri E. Dubrova: Cold War Debates and the Genetic Effects of Low-Dose Radiation.Magdalena E. Stawkowski & Donna M. Goldstein - 2015 - Journal of the History of Biology 48 (1):67-98.
    This article traces disagreements about the genetic effects of low-dose radiation exposure as waged by James Neel, a central figure in radiation studies of Japanese populations after World War II, and Yuri Dubrova, who analyzed the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident. In a 1996 article in Nature, Dubrova reported a statistically significant increase in the minisatellite DNA mutation rate in the children of parents who received a high dose of radiation from the Chernobyl accident, contradicting studies that found no (...)
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  • Defending Scientific Freedom and Democracy: The Genetics Society of America’s Response to Lysenko. [REVIEW]Rena Selya - 2012 - Journal of the History of Biology 45 (3):415 - 442.
    In the late 1940s and early 1950s, the leaders of the Genetics Society of America (GSA) struggled to find an appropriate group response to Trofim Lysenko's scientific claims and the Soviet treatment of geneticists. Although some of the leaders of the GSA favored a swift, critical response, procedural and ideological obstacles prevented them from following this path. Concerned about establishing scientific orthodoxy on one hand and politicizing the content of their science on the other, these American geneticists drew on democratic (...)
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  • What Is Race? UNESCO, Mass Communication and Human Genetics in the Early 1950s.Jenny Bangham - 2015 - History of the Human Sciences 28 (5):80-107.
    What Is Race? Evidence from Scientists is a picture book for schoolchildren published by UNESCO as part of its high-profile campaign on race. The 87-page, oblong, soft-cover booklet contains bold, semi-abstract, pared-down images accompanied by text, devised to make scientific concepts ‘more easily intelligible to the layman’. Produced by UNESCO’s Department of Mass Communication, the picture book represents the organization’s early-postwar confidence in the power of scientific knowledge as a social remedy and diplomatic tool. In keeping with a significant component (...)
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  • What’s in a Name? From “Fluctuation Fit” to “Conformational Selection”: Rediscovery of a Concept.Beáta G. Vértessy & Ferenc Orosz - 2021 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 43 (3):1-21.
    Rediscoveries are not rare in biology. A recent example is the re-birth of the "fluctuation fit" concept developed by F. B. Straub and G. Szabolcsi in the sixties of the last century, under various names, the most popular of which is the "conformational selection". This theory offers an alternative to the "induced fit" concept by Koshland for the interpretation of the mechanism of protein—ligand interactions. A central question is whether the ligand induces a conformational change or rather selects and stabilizes (...)
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  • Defending Scientific Freedom and Democracy: The Genetics Society of America’s Response to Lysenko.Rena Selya - 2012 - Journal of the History of Biology 45 (3):415-442.
    In the late 1940s and early 1950s, the leaders of the Genetics Society of America struggled to find an appropriate group response to Trofim Lysenko’s scientific claims and the Soviet treatment of geneticists. Although some of the leaders of the GSA favored a swift, critical response, procedural and ideological obstacles prevented them from following this path. Concerned about establishing scientific orthodoxy on one hand and politicizing the content of their science on the other, these American geneticists drew on democratic language (...)
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  • Intellectual Property, Plant Breeding and the Making of Mendelian Genetics.Berris Charnley & Gregory Radick - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 44 (2):222-233.
    Advocates of “Mendelism” early on stressed the usefulness of Mendelian principles for breeders. Ever since, that usefulness—and the favourable opinion of Mendelism it supposedly engendered among breeders—has featured in explanations of the rapid rise of Mendelian genetics. An important counter-tradition of commentary, however, has emphasized the ways in which early Mendelian theory in fact fell short of breeders’ needs. Attention to intellectual property, narrowly and broadly construed, makes possible an approach that takes both the tradition and the counter-tradition seriously, by (...)
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  • The Professor and the Pea: Lives and Afterlives of William Bateson’s Campaign for the Utility of Mendelism.Gregory Radick - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 44 (2):280-291.
    As a defender of the fundamental importance of Mendel’s experiments for understanding heredity, the English biologist William Bateson did much to publicize the usefulness of Mendelian science for practical breeders. In the course of his campaigning, he not only secured a reputation among breeders as a scientific expert worth listening to but articulated a vision of the ideal relations between pure and applied science in the modern state. Yet historical writing about Bateson has tended to underplay these utilitarian elements of (...)
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