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  1. Minds, Brains, and Programs.John Searle - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (3):417-57.
    What psychological and philosophical significance should we attach to recent efforts at computer simulations of human cognitive capacities? In answering this question, I find it useful to distinguish what I will call "strong" AI from "weak" or "cautious" AI. According to weak AI, the principal value of the computer in the study of the mind is that it gives us a very powerful tool. For example, it enables us to formulate and test hypotheses in a more rigorous and precise fashion. (...)
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  • Multiple Review.Robyn Carston - 1987 - Mind and Language 2 (4):333-349.
  • Why Self-Control is Both Difficult and Difficult to Explicate.David Premack & Ann James Premack - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (1):140-141.
    The present intractability of and near intractability of make self-control a difficult topic.
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  • Intentional Schema Will Not Do the Work of a Theory of Mind.David Premack & Ann James Premack - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (1):138-140.
    Barresi & Moore's “intentional schema” will not do the work of “theory of mind.” Their model will account neither for fundamental facts of social competence, such as the social attributions of the 10-month-old infant, nor the possibility that, though having a theory of mind, the chimpanzee's theory is “weaker” than the human's.
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  • The Plight of the Sense-Making Ape.David A. Leavens - unknown
    This is a selective review of the published literature on object-choice tasks, where participants use directional cues to find hidden objects. This literature comprises the efforts of researchers to make sense of the sense-making capacities of our nearest living relatives. This chapter is written to highlight some nonsensical conclusions that frequently emerge from this research. The data suggest that when apes are given approximately the same sense-making opportunities as we provide our children, then they will easily make sense of our (...)
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  • Behaviorism at Fifty.B. F. Skinner - 1974 - New York: J. Norton Publishers.
    Each of us is uniquely subject to certain kinds of stimulation from a small part of the universe within our skins. Mentalistic psychologies insist that other kinds of events, lacking the physical dimensions of stimuli, are accessible to the owner of the skin within which they occur. One solution often regarded as behavioristic, granting the distinction between public and private events and ruling the latter out of consideration, has not been successful. A science of behavior must face the problem of (...)
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  • Chimpanzee Theory of Mind: Part I. Perception of Causality and Purpose in the Child and Chimpanzee.David Premack & Guy Woodruff - 1978 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (4):616-629.
  • Gavagai!: Or, the Future History of the Animal Language Controversy.David Premack - 1986 - MIT Press.
    In this witty and fascinating book, Premack examines arguments over whether humans are unique because we can talk.
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  • Understanding That Looking Causes Knowing.David R. Olson & Bruce Homer - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (1):135-135.
    Barresi & Moore provide an impressive account of how the coordination of first and third person information about the self and other could produce an account of intentional relations. They are less explicit as to how the child comes to understand the basic epistemic relation between experience and knowledge, that is, how informational access causes belief. We suggest one route.
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  • Knowing Thyself, Knowing the Other: They're Not the Same.Jonathan Schull & J. David Smith - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):166-167.
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  • Cultural Learning and Educational Process.David R. Olson & Janet Wilde Astington - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (3):531-532.
  • Inferential Communication: Bridging the Gap Between Intentional and Ostensive Communication in Non-Human Primates.Elizabeth Warren & Josep Call - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Communication, when defined as an act intended to affect the psychological state of another individual, demands the use of inference. Either the signaler, the recipient, or both must make leaps of understanding which surpass the semantic information available and draw from pragmatic clues to fully imbue and interpret meaning. While research into human communication and the evolution of language has long been comfortable with mentalistic interpretations of communicative exchanges, including rich attributions of mental state, research into animal communication has balked (...)
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  • The Return of the Arbitrary: Peikoff's Trinity, Binswanger's Inferno, Unwanted Possibilities—and a Parrot for President.Robert L. Campbell - 2019 - Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 19 (1):83-134.
    Leonard Peikoff brought into Objectivist epistemology the doctrine that what is asserted arbitrarily cannot be true or false. In 2008 the author gave a detailed critique of the doctrine; it has not received a published response. But there have been restatements by Harry Binswanger, Ben Bayer, and Gregory Salmieri. Their re-presentations do not refute any old arguments; their new arguments make the doctrine worse. The doctrine is being used to justify ignoring known possibilities, and to “prove” that the current president (...)
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  • “Gavagai!” or the Future History of the Animal Language Controversy.David Premack - 1985 - Cognition 19 (3):207-296.
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  • In Defense of Wordless Thoughts About Thoughts.Robert W. Lurz - 2007 - Mind and Language 22 (3):270–296.
    Bermúdez (2003) argues that (T1) nonlinguistic creatures can think thoughts about protocausal conditional states of affairs and engage in rudimentary forms of reasoning, but (T2) they cannot ‘in principle’ think thoughts about thoughts (propositions)—in particular, they cannot have higher-order propositional attitudes (PAs). I reconstruct Bermúdez’s argument for T2 and show that it rests upon an implausible empirical assumption and is, therefore, not a threat to current empirical research into nonlinguistic higher-order PAs. I argue that even on an interpretation of the (...)
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  • Evidence for the Innateness of Deontic Reasoning.Denise Dellarosa Cummins - 1996 - Mind and Language 11 (2):160-90.
  • Omitting the Second Person in Social Understanding.Vasudevi Reddy - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (1):140-141.
    Barresi & Moore do not consider information about intentional relations available within emotional engagement with others and do not see that others are perceived in the second as well as the third person. Recognising second person information forces recognition of similarities and connections not otherwise available. A developmental framework built on the assumption of the complete separateness of self and other is inevitably flawed.
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  • The Behaviorist Concept of Mind.David M. Rosenthal - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (4):643.
  • Intentionality: How to Tell Mae West From a Crocodile.David Premack - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (3):522.
  • Competence Models Are Causal.David Kirsh - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (3):515.
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  • Animal Beliefs and Their Contents.Frank Dreckmann - 1999 - Erkenntnis 51 (1):597-615.
    This paper investigates whether, or not, the behavior of animals without speech can manifest beliefs and desires. Criteria for the attribution of such beliefs and desires are worked out with reference to Jonathan Bennett's theory of cognitive teleology: A particular ability for learning justifies attributing such beliefs and desires. The conceptual analysis is illustrated by examinations of cognitive ethology and considers higher-order intentionality. It is argued that the behavioral evidence only supports the attribution of first order beliefs and that languageless (...)
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  • Above Suspicion: Cognitive and Intentional Aspects of the Ability to Lie.Beatrice De Gelder - 1988 - Argumentation 2 (1):77-87.
    This paper looks at the attribution of the ability to lie and not at lying or lies. It also departs from more familiar approaches by focussing on the appraisal of an ability and not on the ability in itself. We believe that this attribution perspective is required to bring out the cognitive and intentional basis of the ability to lie.
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  • Emotion as a Process: Function, Origin and Regulation.Klaus R. Scherer - 1982 - Social Science Information 21 (4-5):555-570.
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  • The Realm of Continued Emergence: The Semiotics of George Herbert Mead and its Implications to Biosemiotics, Semiotic Matrix Theory, and Ecological Ethics.Jorge Conesa Sevilla - 2005 - Sign Systems Studies 33 (1):27-50.
    This examination of the often-inaccessible work and semiotics of George Herbert Mead focuses first on his pivotal ideas of Sociality, Consciousness, and Communication. Mead’s insight of sociality as forced relatedness, or forced semiosis, appearing early in evolution, or appearing in simple systems, guarantees him a foundational place among biosemioticians. These ideas are Mead’s exemplar description of multiple referentiality afforded to social organisms, thus enabling passing from one umwelt to another, with relative ease. Although Mead’s comprehensive semiosis is basically sound, and (...)
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  • New Elements of a Theory of Mind in Wild Chimpanzees.Christophe Boesch - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):149-150.
  • A Dualist-Interactionist Perspective.John C. Eccles - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (3):430-431.
  • Intentions as Goads.David McFarland - 1983 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (3):369.
  • From Mouth to Hand: Gesture, Speech, and the Evolution of Right-Handedness.Michael C. Corballis - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (2):199-208.
    The strong predominance of right-handedness appears to be a uniquely human characteristic, whereas the left-cerebral dominance for vocalization occurs in many species, including frogs, birds, and mammals. Right-handedness may have arisen because of an association between manual gestures and vocalization in the evolution of language. I argue that language evolved from manual gestures, gradually incorporating vocal elements. The transition may be traced through changes in the function of Broca's area. Its homologue in monkeys has nothing to do with vocal control, (...)
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  • Causal Beliefs Lead to Toolmaking, Which Require Handedness for Motor Control.Lewis Wolpert - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (2):242-242.
    Toolmaking requires motor skills that in turn require handedness, so that there is no competition between the two sides of the brain. Thus, handedness is not necessarily linked to vocalization but to the origin of causal beliefs required for making complex tools. Language may have evolved from these processes.
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  • Dominance Hierarchies and the Evolution of Human Reasoning.Denise Dellarosa Cummins - 1996 - Minds and Machines 6 (4):463-480.
    Research from ethology and evolutionary biology indicates the following about the evolution of reasoning capacity. First, solving problems of social competition and cooperation have direct impact on survival rates and reproductive success. Second, the social structure that evolved from this pressure is the dominance hierarchy. Third, primates that live in large groups with complex dominance hierarchies also show greater neocortical development, and concomitantly greater cognitive capacity. These facts suggest that the necessity of reasoning effectively about dominance hierarchies left an indelible (...)
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  • The Functionalist Reply.William G. Lycan - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (3):434-435.
  • Science, Objectivity and Moral Values.Alberto Cordero - 1992 - Science & Education 1 (1):49-70.
  • Total Umwelten Create Shared Meaning the Emergent Properties of Animal Groups as a Result of Social Signalling.Amelia Lewis - 2020 - Biosemiotics 13 (3):431-441.
    In this paper, I discuss the concept of ‘shared meaning’, and the relationship between a shared understanding of signs within an animal social group and the Umwelten of individuals within the group. I explore the concept of the ‘Total Umwelt’, as described by Tønnesen,, and use examples from the traditional ethology literature to demonstrate how semiotic principles can not only be applied, but underpin the observations made in animal social biology. Traditionally, neo-Darwinian theories of evolution concentrate on ‘fitness’ or an (...)
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  • First Person Representations Need a Methodology Based on Simulation or Theory.Robert M. Gordon - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (1):130-131.
    Although their thesis is generally sound, Barresi & Moore give insufficient attention to the need for a methodology, whether simulation based or theory-based, for choosing among alternative possible matches of first person and third person information. This choice must be sensitive to contextual information, including past behavior. Moreover, apart from simulation or theory, first person information would not help predict future behavior.
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  • Are Monkeys Able to Discriminate Appearance From Reality?Marie Hirel, Constance Thiriau, Inès Roho & Hélène Meunier - 2020 - Cognition 196:104123.
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  • Smoke and Mirrors: Testing the Scope of Chimpanzees’ Appearance–Reality Understanding.Carla Krachun, Robert Lurz, Jamie L. Russell & William D. Hopkins - 2016 - Cognition 150:53-67.
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  • Wishful Thinking Impairs Belief-Desire Reasoning: A Case of Decoupling Failure in Adults?Nigel Harvey - 1992 - Cognition 45 (2):141-162.
  • Chimpanzees Deceive a Human Competitor by Hiding.Brian Hare, Josep Call & Michael Tomasello - 2006 - Cognition 101 (3):495-514.
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  • Behaviorism at Fifty.B. F. Skinner - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (4):615.
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  • Behaviorism at Seventy.Daniel N. Robinson - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (4):641-643.
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  • Logical Adaptationism.Ron Amundson - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (3):505.
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  • Darwin, Deceit, and Metacommunication.Stuart A. Altmann - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (2):244-245.
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  • Monkeys Mind.Colin Allen - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):147-147.
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  • Reductionism and Religion.Douglas R. Hofstadter - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (3):433-434.
  • Anecdotes and Critical Anthropomorphism.Gordon M. Burghardt - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (2):248-249.
  • The Distant Blast of Lloyd Morgan's Canon.Cecilia Heyes - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (2):256-257.
  • Lloyd Morgan's Canon in Evolutionary Context.Michael T. Ghiselin - 1983 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (3):362.
  • Surplusages Audience Effects and George John Romanes.Donald A. Dewsbury - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):152-152.
  • Belief Accripton, Parsimony, and Rationality.John Hell - 1983 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (3):365.
  • Symbolic Invention: The Missing (Computational) Link?Andy Clark - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (4):753-754.