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  1. Rethinking Woodger’s Legacy in the Philosophy of Biology.Daniel J. Nicholson & Richard Gawne - 2014 - Journal of the History of Biology 47 (2):243-292.
    The writings of Joseph Henry Woodger (1894–1981) are often taken to exemplify everything that was wrongheaded, misguided, and just plain wrong with early twentieth-century philosophy of biology. Over the years, commentators have said of Woodger: (a) that he was a fervent logical empiricist who tried to impose the explanatory gold standards of physics onto biology, (b) that his philosophical work was completely disconnected from biological science, (c) that he possessed no scientific or philosophical credentials, and (d) that his work was (...)
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  • Is “Meme” a New “Idea”? Reflections on Aunger.John Wilkins - 2005 - Biology and Philosophy 20 (2-3):585-598.
    Memes are an idea whose time has come, again, and again, and again, but which has never really made it beyond metaphor. Anthropologist Robert Aunger’s book The Electric Meme is a new attempt to take it to the next stage, setting up a research program with proper models and theoretical entities. He succeeds partially, with some contributions to the logic of replication, but in the end, his proposal for the substrate of memes is a non-solution to a central problem of (...)
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  • Towards a Neo‐Aristotelian Mereology.Kathrin Koslicki - 2007 - Dialectica 61 (1):127-159.
    This paper provides a detailed examination of Kit Fine’s sizeable contribution to the development of a neo‐Aristotelian alternative to standard mereology; I focus especially on the theory of ‘rigid’ and ‘variable embodiments’, as defended in Fine 1999. Section 2 briefly describes the system I call ‘standard mereology’. Section 3 lays out some of the main principles and consequences of Aristotle’s own mereology, in order to be able to compare Fine’s system with its historical precursor. Section 4 gives an exposition of (...)
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  • A Comparison of the Meaning and Uses of Models in Mathematics and the Empirical Sciences.Patrick Suppes - 1960 - Synthese 12 (2-3):287--301.
  • Note Critiche.Massimo Libardi & Roberto Poli - 1993 - Axiomathes 4 (1):105-140.
  • A Semantic View of Ecological Theories.David G. A. Castle - 2001 - Dialectica 55 (1):51–66.
    Philosophical analysis of ecological theories has lagged behind the study of evolutionary theory. The semantic conception of scientific theories, which has been employed successfully in the analysis of evolutionary theory, is adopted here to analyse ecological theory. Two general problems in ecology are discussed. One arises from the continued use of covering law models in ecology, and the other concerns the applicability of ecological theory in conservation biology. The semantic conception of ecological theories is used to resolve these problems.
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  • Proof Verification and Proof Discovery for Relativity.Naveen Sundar Govindarajalulu, Selmer Bringsjord & Joshua Taylor - 2015 - Synthese 192 (7):2077-2094.
    The vision of machines autonomously carrying out substantive conjecture generation, theorem discovery, proof discovery, and proof verification in mathematics and the natural sciences has a long history that reaches back before the development of automatic systems designed for such processes. While there has been considerable progress in proof verification in the formal sciences, for instance the Mizar project’ and the four-color theorem, now machine verified, there has been scant such work carried out in the realm of the natural sciences—until recently. (...)
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  • The Matching of Parts of Things.Charles J. Jardine & Nicholas Jardine - 1971 - Studia Logica 27 (1):123 - 132.
    An axiomatic treatment of the relation part of is shown to lead naturally to an account of the ways in which parts of things are matched. The determination of matchings by the properties of parts and by the relations between parts is discussed and shown to be relevant to certain classificatory problems in science. The connexions between matchings and symmetries of parts are explored, and a general account is given of the ways in which ambiguities in the matching of parts (...)
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  • Coming of Age in the Philosophy of Biology.Michael Bradie - 1987 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 30 (4):459 – 475.
  • The Devious Roads of Science.N. Rashevsky - 1963 - Synthese 15 (1):107 - 114.
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  • Ernst Mayr's Influence on the History and Philosophy of Biology: A Personal Memoir. [REVIEW]David L. Hull - 1994 - Biology and Philosophy 9 (3):375-386.
    Mayr has made both conceptual and professional contributions to the establishment of the history and philosophy of biology. His conceptual contributions include, among many others, the notion of population thinking. He has also played an important role in the establishment of history and philosophy of biology as viable professional disciplines.
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  • The Semantic Structure of Evolutionary Biology as an Argument Against Intelligent Design.James A. T. Lancaster - 2011 - Zygon 46 (1):26-46.
    Abstract. This paper examines the impact of two formalizations of evolutionary biology on the antiselectionist critiques of the Intelligent Design (ID) movement. It looks first at attempts to apply the syntactic framework of the physical sciences to biology in the twentieth century, and to their effect upon the ID movement. It then examines the more heuristic account of biological-theory structure, namely, the semantic model. Finally, it concludes by advocating the semantic conception and emphasizing the problems that the semantic model creates (...)
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