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  1. Distinct Labels Attenuate 15-Month-Olds’ Attention to Shape in an Inductive Inference Task.Susan A. Graham, Jean Keates, Ena Vukatana & Melanie Khu - 2012 - Frontiers in Psychology 3.
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  • Neurophilosophy of Number.Hourya Benis Sinaceur - 2017 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 31 (1):1-25.
    Neurosciences and cognitive sciences provide us with myriad empirical findings that shed light on hypothesised primitive numerical processes in the brain and in the mind. Yet, the hypotheses on which the experiments are based, and hence the results, depend strongly on sophisticated abstract models used to describe and explain neural data or cognitive representations that supposedly are the empirical roots of primary arithmetical activity. I will question the foundational role of such models. I will even cast doubt upon the search (...)
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  • Becoming Status Conscious: Children's Appreciation of Social Reality.Charles Kalish - 2005 - Philosophical Explorations 8 (3):245 – 263.
    This paper explores the cognitive developments underlying conventionalized social phenomena such as language and ownership. What do children make of the claims that, 'This is mine' or 'That is called "water"?' Understanding these features of social reality involves appreciating status as a system of normative prescriptions. Research on children's theories of intentional agency suggests important constraints on the development of status systems. Key insights are that prescriptions affect behavior only via representations, and that the norms involved in prescriptions are distinct (...)
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  • Beyond 'What'and 'How Many': Capacity, Complexity, and Resolution of Infants' Object Representations.Jennifer M. Zosh & Lisa Feigenson - 2009 - In Bruce M. Hood & Laurie Santos (eds.), The Origins of Object Knowledge. Oxford University Press. pp. 25--51.
  • A-Not-B Errors: Testing the Limits of Natural Pedagogy Theory.Marion Vorms - 2012 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 3 (4):525-545.
    Gergely and Csibra's theory, known as "natural pedagogy theory", is meant to explain how infants fast-learn generic knowledge from adults. In this paper, my goal is to assess the explanatory import of this theory in a particular case, namely the phenomena known as "A-not-B errors". I first propose a clarification of natural pedagogy theory's fundamental hypotheses. Then, I describe Topál et al.'s (Science, 321, 1831-1834, 2008) experiments, which consist in applying natural pedagogy theory's framework to the A-not-B errors. Finally, I (...)
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  • Razonamiento Animal: Negación y Representaciones de Ausencia.Jorge Morales - 2011 - Revista Argentina de Ciencias Del Comportamiento 3 (1):20-33.
    In this paper, I reject that animal reasoning, negation in particular, necessarily involves the representation of absences, as suggested by Bermúdez (2003, 2006, 2007), since this would still work as a logical negation (unavailable for non-linguistic creatures). False belief, pretense, and communication experiments show that non-human animals (at least some primates) have difficulties representing absent entities or properties. I offer an alternative account resorting to the sub-symbolic similarity judgments proposed by Vigo & Allen (2009) and expectations: animal proto-negation takes place (...)
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  • Object Individuation Using Property/Kind Information in Rhesus Macaques.Laurie R. Santos, Gregory M. Sulkowski, Geertrui M. Spaepen & Marc D. Hauser - 2002 - Cognition 83 (3):241-264.
  • Rich Interpretation Vs. Deflationary Accounts in Cognitive Development: The Case of Means-End Skills in 7-Month-Old Infants.Yuko Munakata, David Bauer, Tracy Stackhouse, Laura Landgraf & Jennifer Huddleston - 2002 - Cognition 83 (3):B43-B53.
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  • Conceiving of Entities as Objects and as Stuff.Sandeep Prasada, Krag Ferenz & Todd Haskell - 2002 - Cognition 83 (2):141-165.
  • Infants' Knowledge of Objects: Beyond Object Files and Object Tracking.Susan Carey & Fei Xu - 2001 - Cognition 80 (1-2):179-213.
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  • The Emergence of Kind Concepts: A Rejoinder to Needham and Baillargeon.Fei Xu & Susan Carey - 2000 - Cognition 74 (3):285-301.
  • Infants' Use of Featural and Experiential Information in Segregating and Individuating Objects: A Reply to Xu, Carey and Welch.Amy Needham & Renée Baillargeon - 2000 - Cognition 74 (3):255-284.
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  • The Role of Language in Acquiring Object Kind Concepts in Infancy.Fei Xu - 2002 - Cognition 85 (3):223-250.
  • The “What” and “Where” of Object Representations in Infancy.Denis Mareschal & Mark H. Johnson - 2003 - Cognition 88 (3):259-276.
  • The Nature of Intuitions and Their Role in Material Object Metaphysics.Andrew Higgins - 2014 - Dissertation, University of Illinois
    I argue for three central theses: ‘intuition’ is ambiguous, in material object metaphysics ‘intuition’ refers to pre-theoretical beliefs, and these pre-theoretical beliefs are generated by an innate physical reasoning system. I begin by outlining the relevant background discussions on the nature of intuitions and their role in philosophy to motivate the need for a more careful investigation of the meaning of ‘intuition’ and the role of intuitions in specific sub-disciplines of philosophy. In chapters one and two I argue that ‘intuition’ (...)
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  • Priming Infants to Attend to Color and Pattern Information in an Individuation Task.Teresa Wilcox & Catherine Chapa - 2004 - Cognition 90 (3):265-302.
  • Sortals for Dummies.John E. Sarnecki - 2008 - Erkenntnis 69 (2):145-164.
    Advocates of sortal essentialism have argued that concepts like “thing” or “object” lack the unambiguous individuative criteria necessary to play the role of genuine sortals in reference. Instead, they function as “dummy sortals” which are placeholders or incomplete designations. In disqualifying apparent placeholder sortals, however, these philosophers have posed insuperable problems for accounts of childhood conceptual development. I argue that recent evidence in psychology demonstrates that children do possess simple or basic sortals of physical objects or things. I contend that (...)
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  • Infants' Formation and Use of Categories to Segregate Objects.Amy Needham, Gwenden Dueker & Gregory Lockhead - 2005 - Cognition 94 (3):215-240.
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  • Establishing Object Correspondence Across Eye Movements: Flexible Use of Spatiotemporal and Surface Feature Information.Ashleigh M. Richard, Steven J. Luck & Andrew Hollingworth - 2008 - Cognition 109 (1):66-88.
  • Sortal Concepts, Object Individuation, and Language.Fei Xu - 2007 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (9):400-406.
  • The Cyclical Ontogeny of Ontology: An Integrated Developmental Account of Object and Speech Categorization.Reese M. Heitner - 2004 - Philosophical Psychology 17 (1):45 – 57.
    More than a decade of experimental research confirms that external linguistic information provided in the form of word labels can induce a "mutually exclusive" bias against double naming and lead children to infer the name of novel objects and parts. Linguistic labels have also been shown to encourage more sophisticated reasoning, particularly with respect to superordinate and atypical object categorization. By contrast, however, the inverse possibility that the linguistic labeling of basic-level objects may also developmentally support the kind of "phonological (...)
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  • Evidence for Kind Representations in the Absence of Language: Experiments with Rhesus Monkeys.Webb Phillips & Laurie R. Santos - 2007 - Cognition 102 (3):455-463.
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  • An Association Account of False Belief Understanding.L. C. De Bruin & Albert Newen - 2012 - Cognition 123 (2):240-259.
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  • Core Knowledge and its Limits: The Domain of Food.Kristin Shutts, Kirsten F. Condry, Laurie R. Santos & Elizabeth S. Spelke - 2009 - Cognition 112 (1):120-140.
  • The Significance of Names.Robin Jeshion - 2009 - Mind and Language 24 (4):370-403.
    As a class of terms and mental representations, proper names and mental names possess an important function that outstrips their semantic and psycho-semantic functions as common, rigid devices of direct reference and singular mental representations of their referents, respectively. They also function as abstract linguistic markers that signal and underscore their referents' individuality. I promote this thesis to explain why we give proper names to certain particulars, but not others; to account for the transfer of singular thought via communication with (...)
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