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  1. Academic Cheating in Mathematics Classes: A Motivational Perspective.Nina Pavlin-Bernardić, Daria Rovan & Jurana Pavlović - 2017 - Ethics and Behavior 27 (6):486-501.
    We investigated the frequency of secondary school students’ self-reported cheating in mathematics and relationships between cheating and motivational beliefs, as well as neutralizing attitudes. Two types of cheating were examined: active cheating, which is aimed to increase a person’s own success, and second-party cheating, aimed to help other students achieve success. Students use second-party cheating very often and more than active cheating. Motivational beliefs are significantly related to active cheating but uncorrelated with second-party cheating. Thus, although active and second-party cheating (...)
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  • What Prevents Students From Reporting Academic Misconduct? A Survey of Croatian Students.Vanja Pupovac, Stjepka Popović & Vedran Blažina - forthcoming - Journal of Academic Ethics:1-12.
    Academic misconduct is widespread in all cultures, and factors that influence it have been investigated for many years. An act of reporting peers’ misconduct not only identifies and prevents misconduct, but also encourages a student to think and act morally and raises awareness about academic integrity. The aim of this study was to determine factors that prevent students from reporting academic misconduct. A questionnaire to assess views on reporting the academic misconduct of a colleague was developed and sent to all (...)
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  • The Impact of Mindfulness and Perceived Importance of Peer Reporting on Students’ Response to Peers’ Academic Dishonesty.Barbara Culiberg & Katarina Katja Mihelič - forthcoming - Ethics and Behavior:0-15.
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  • Exploring Individual and Contextual Antecedents of Attitudes Toward the Acceptability of Cheating and Plagiarism.Joana R. C. Kuntz & Chandele Butler - 2014 - Ethics and Behavior 24 (6):478-494.
    The purpose of this study was to identify the relative contribution of individual and contextual predictors to students’ attitudes toward the acceptability of cheating and plagiarism. A group of 324 students from a tertiary institution in New Zealand completed an online survey. The findings indicate that gender, justice sensitivity, and understanding of university policies regarding academic dishonesty were the key predictors of the students’ attitudes toward the acceptability of cheating and plagiarism, both as agents of dishonest conduct and as witnesses (...)
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  • Turning a Blind Eye: A Study of Peer Reporting in a Business School Setting.Katarina Katja Mihelič & Barbara Culiberg - 2014 - Ethics and Behavior 24 (5):364-381.
    This article examines student peer reporting by extending the findings from the business ethics and higher education literature. In the conceptual model we propose that reflective moral attentiveness, subjective knowledge of the code of ethics, and academic dishonesty beliefs antecede ethical judgment of peer reporting, which impacts intentions to report peers’ unethical behavior. The relationships are tested using structural equation modeling. The findings indicate that moral attentiveness significantly influences ethical judgment, which in turn affects intention. The relationship between beliefs about (...)
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  • Assessing Freshman Engineering Students’ Understanding of Ethical Behavior.Amber M. Henslee, Susan L. Murray, Gayla R. Olbricht, Douglas K. Ludlow, Malcolm E. Hays & Hannah M. Nelson - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (1):287-304.
    Academic dishonesty, including cheating and plagiarism, is on the rise in colleges, particularly among engineering students. While students decide to engage in these behaviors for many different reasons, academic integrity training can help improve their understanding of ethical decision making. The two studies outlined in this paper assess the effectiveness of an online module in increasing academic integrity among first semester engineering students. Study 1 tested the effectiveness of an academic honesty tutorial by using a between groups design with a (...)
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  • Using a Two-Tier Test to Examine Taiwanese Graduate Students’ Misunderstanding of Responsible Conduct of Research.Sophia Jui-An Pan & Chien Chou - 2015 - Ethics and Behavior 25 (6):500-527.
    The present study investigates Taiwanese graduate students’ general understanding and misunderstanding of Responsible Conduct of Research. A total of 580 graduate students responded to the self-developed Responsible Conduct of Research Reasoning Test. The results reveal that, first, students did not have sufficient knowledge to reason why a particular instance of research conduct was doable or not. Second, the statistical results show that female students, students majoring in the humanities or the social sciences, doctoral-level students, and students with RCR-related training outperformed (...)
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