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  1. She’-E-O Compensation Gap: A Role Congruity View.Joyce C. Wang, Lívia Markóczy, Sunny Li Sun & Mike W. Peng - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-16.
    Is there a compensation gap between female CEOs and male CEOs? If so, are there mechanisms to mitigate the compensation gap? Extending role congruity theory, we argue that the perception mismatch between the female gender role and the leadership role may lead to lower compensation to female CEOs, resulting in a gender compensation gap. Nevertheless, the compensation gap may be narrowed if female CEOs display agentic traits through risk-taking, or alternatively, work in female-dominated industries where communal traits are valued. Additionally, (...)
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  • Are Women CEOs Valuable in Terms of Bank Loan Costs? Evidence From China.Jin-hui Luo, Zeyue Huang, Xue Li & Xiaojing Lin - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 153 (2):337-355.
    Given that women CEOs are usually more risk averse, engage less in opportunistic behavior, and provide higher quality earnings than men CEOs, we argue that firms with women CEOs are likely to face lower operational and information risk and thus enjoy cheaper external funds. Using a large sample of Chinese A-share listed firms operating from 2006 to 2012, we find consistent evidence that Chinese banks tend to impose lower loan costs on firms with women CEOs compared to firms with men (...)
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  • Increasing the Number of Women on Boards: The Role of Actors and Processes.Cathrine Seierstad, Gillian Warner-Søderholm, Mariateresa Torchia & Morten Huse - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 141 (2):289-315.
    Understanding the spread of national public policies to increase the percentage of women on boards is often presented using different types of institutional theory logic. However, the importance of the political games influencing these decisions has not received the same attention. In this article, we look beyond the institutional setting by focusing on the role of actors. We explore processes that include who the critical actors that drive and determine these policies are, and what motivates them to push for change. (...)
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  • Few Women on Boards: What’s Identity Got to Do With It?Lívia Markoczy, Sunny Li Sun & Jigao Zhu - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-17.
    Drawing on the similarity-attraction perspective and social identity theory, we argue that male versus female interlocking directors are likely to have different experiences when they work alongside female board directors of other firms. The theorized source of such experiences for male interlocking directors is in-group favoritism and/or a social identity threat-related discomfort. Interlocking female directors are theorized to be ambivalent between desiring social support versus experiencing identity threat-based career concerns. These experiences are predicted to motivate male versus female interlocking directors (...)
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