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  1. Imputing Intentionality: Popper, Demarcation and Darwin, Freud and Marx.Steven Yearley - 1984 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 16 (4):337.
  • Partition Epistemology and Arguments From Analogy.Alex Levine - 2009 - Synthese 166 (3):593-600.
    Nineteenth and twentieth century philosophies of science have consistently failed to identify any rational basis for the compelling character of scientific analogies. This failure is particularly worrisome in light of the fact that the development and diffusion of certain scientific analogies, e.g. Darwin’s analogy between domestic breeds and naturally occurring species, constitute paradigm cases of good science. It is argued that the interactivist model, through the notion of a partition epistemology, provides a way to understand the persuasive character of compelling (...)
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  • The Unseen Universe: Physics and the Philosophy of Nature in Victorian Britain.P. M. Heimann - 1972 - British Journal for the History of Science 6 (1):73-79.
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  • Lyell and Evolution: An Account of Lyell's Response to the Prospect of an Evolutionary Ancestry for Man.Michael Bartholomew - 1973 - British Journal for the History of Science 6 (3):261-303.
  • Coadaptation and the Inadequacy of Natural Selection.Mark Ridley - 1982 - British Journal for the History of Science 15 (1):45-68.
    When Charles Darwin published his theory in 1859 the biological community gave very different receptions to the idea of evolution and to the theory of natural selection. Evolution was accepted as widely and rapidly as natural selection was rejected. Most biologists were ready to accept that evolution had occurred, but not that natural selection was its cause. They preferred other explanations of evolution, such as theories of big directed variation, or admitted that they did not know its cause. Darwin himself (...)
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  • Malthus, Jesus, and Darwin.John M. Pullen - 1987 - Religious Studies 23 (2):233 - 246.
  • Clerical Legacies and Secular Snares: Patriarchal Science and Patriarchal Science Studies.Maureen McNeil - 1996 - The European Legacy 1 (5):1728-1739.
  • Finalization: A New Start for Science Policy?Ron Johnston - 1976 - Social Science Information 15 (2-3):331-336.
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  • The Logic of Discovery and Darwin's Pre-Malthusian Researches.Scott A. Kleiner - 1988 - Biology and Philosophy 3 (3):293-315.
    Traditional logical empiricist and more recent historicist positions on the logic of discovery are briefly reviewed and both are found wanting. None have examined the historical detail now available from recent research on Darwin, from which there is evidence for gradual transition in descriptive and explanatory concepts. This episode also shows that revolutionary research can be directed by borrowed metascientific objectives and heuristics from other disciplines. Darwin's own revolutionary research took place within an ontological context borrowed from non evolutionary predecessors (...)
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  • The Romantic Realism of Michel Foucault Returning to Kant.Charles R. Varela - 2013 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 43 (2):226-245.
    Beatrice Han argues that the theories of subjection (determinism: structure) and subjectivation (freedom: agency) are the “the blind spot of Foucault's work:” to the very end of his life, in being transcendental and historical theories, respectively, they were in irresolvable conflict. In part I, I have argued that Foucault encourages us to situate the theories of the subject in an un-thematized reach for a metaphysics of realism which, in effect, was to ground his uncertain complementary reach for a naturalist conduct (...)
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  • How Did Darwin Arrive at His Theory? The Secondary Literature to 1982.David R. Oldroyd - 1984 - History of Science 22 (4):325-374.
  • Darwin's Experimental Natural History.Hans-Jörg Rheinberger & Peter McLaughlin - 1984 - Journal of the History of Biology 17 (3):345 - 368.
  • Clean Talk in Genetics.Greg Myers - 1992 - Social Epistemology 6 (2):193 – 202.
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  • Merging Biological Metaphors. Creativity, Darwinism and Biosemiotics.Carlos David Suárez Pascal - 2017 - Biosemiotics 10 (3):369-378.
    Evolutionary adaptation has been suggested as the hallmark of life that best accounts for life’s creativity. However, current evolutionary approaches still fail to give an adequate account of it, even if they are able to explain both the origin of novelties and the proliferation of certain traits in a population. Although modern-synthesis Darwinism is today usually appraised as too narrow a position to cope with all the complexities of developmental and structural biology—not to say biosemiotic phenomena—, Darwinism need not be (...)
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  • The Ghosts in the Meme Machine.Gustav Jahoda - 2002 - History of the Human Sciences 15 (2):55-68.
    The notion of `memes' as replicators similar to genes, but concerned with cultural units, was put forward by Dawkins (1976). Blackmore (1999) used this notion to elaborate an ambitious theory designed to account for numerous aspects of human evolution and psychology. Her theory is based on the human capacity for imitation, and although the operation of the `memes' is said to be purely mechanical, the figurative language used implies that their `actions' are purposive. This article will show that imitation had (...)
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  • The Metaphor of Organization: An Historiographical Perspective on the Bio-Medical Sciences of the Early Nineteenth Century.K. M. Figlio - 1976 - History of Science 14 (1):17-53.
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  • Natural Theology and the Plurality of Worlds: Observations on the Brewster-Whewell Debate.John Hedley Brooke - 1977 - Annals of Science 34 (3):221-286.
    Summary The object of this study is to analyse certain aspects of the debate between David Brewster and William Whewell concerning the probability of extra-terrestrial life, in order to illustrate the nature, constitution and condition of natural theology in the decades immediately preceding the publication in 1859 of Charles Darwin's Origin of species. The argument is directed against a stylised picture of natural theology which has been drawn from a backward projection of the Darwinian antithesis between natural selection and certain (...)
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  • The Economic Consequences of Philip Kitcher.Philip Mirowski - 1996 - Social Epistemology 10 (2):153 – 169.
  • From Ends to Causes by Metaphor: The Paradox of Natural Selection.Stefaan Blancke, Tammy Schellens, Ronald Soetaert, Hilde Van Keer & Johan Braeckman - 2014 - Science & Education 23 (4):793-808.
  • The Rhetoric of Modern Economics.Mirowski Philip - 1990 - History of the Human Sciences 3 (2):243-257.
  • Origins of the Schema of Stimulated Motion: Towards a Pre-History of Modern Psychology.Kurt Danziger - 1983 - History of Science 21 (2):183-210.
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