Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Towards a Grainier Understanding of How to Encourage Morally Responsible Leadership Through the Development of Phronesis: A Typology of Managerial Phronesis.Francois Steyn & Kosheek Sewchurran - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (4):673-695.
    Aristotle’s philosophical insights into ethics, wisdom and practice have drawn the attention of scholars. In the current professional context where ethics are often compromised, this debate assumes a necessary urgency. This subject is highly relevant to business schools, given the general neglect of this quality in executive management development. Our research involved an analysis of contemporary literature on phronesis in the management scholarship, practice and teaching domains. Our definition of phronesis identifies themes and paradoxes distilled from this literature. Stories are (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Socially Sustainable Supply Chain Management and Suppliers’ Social Performance: The Role of Social Capital.Mohammad Alghababsheh & David Gallear - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics.
    The implementation of socially sustainable supply chain management practices to tackle suppliers’ social deficiencies often requires a level of cooperation that can be difficult to establish. Despite this daunting challenge, scant scholarly attention has been paid to explore how the implementation of socially SSCM practices can be effectively facilitated and enhanced. Drawing on social capital theory, this study examines the individual impact of assessment and collaboration practices on suppliers’ social performance and explores whether and how these effects can be moderated (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • An Updated Inquiry Into the Study of Corporate Codes of Ethics: 2005–2016.Maira Babri, Bruce Davidson & Sven Helin - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 168 (1):71-108.
    This paper presents a review of 100 empirical papers studying corporate codes of ethics in business organizations from the time period mid-2005 until mid-2016, following approximately an 11-year time period after the previous review of the literature. The reviewed papers are broadly categorized as content-oriented, output-oriented, or transformation-oriented. The review sheds light on empirical focus, context, questions addressed, methods, findings and theory. The findings are discussed in terms of the three categories as well as the aggregate, stock of empirical CCE (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Hybrid Production Regimes and Labor Agency in Transnational Private Governance.Jean-Christophe Graz, Nicole Helmerich & Cécile Prébandier - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (2):307-321.
    Little consensus exists about the effectiveness of transnational private governance in domains such as labor, the environment, or human rights. The paper builds on recent scholarship on labor standards to emphasize the role of labor agency in transnational private governance. It argues that the relationship between transnational private regulatory initiatives and labor agency depends on three competences: first, the ability of workers’ organizations to gain access to processes of employment regulation, implementation, and monitoring; second, their ability to insist on the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Marketing’s Consequences: Stakeholder Marketing and Supply Chain Corporate Social Responsibility Issues.N. Craig Smith, Guido Palazzo & C. B. Bhattacharya - 2010 - Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (4):617-641.
    While considerable attention has been given to the harm done to consumers by marketing, less attention has been given to the harm done by consumers as an indirect effect of marketing activities, particularly in regard to supply chains. The recent development of dramatically expanded global supply chains has resulted in social and environmental problems upstream that are attributable at least in part to downstream marketers and consumers. Marketers have responded mainly by using corporate social responsibility communication to counter the critique (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Balancing the Scales of Justice: Do Perceptions of Buyers’ Justice Drive Suppliers’ Social Performance?Mohammad Alghababsheh, David Gallear & Mushfiqur Rahman - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (1):125-150.
    A major challenge for supply chain managers is how to manage sourcing relationships to ensure reliable and predictable actions of distant suppliers. The extant research into sustainable supply chain management has traditionally focused on the transactional and collaboration approaches through which buyers encourage suppliers to act responsibly. However, little effort has been devoted to investigating the factors that underpin and enable effective implementation of these two approaches, or to exploring alternative approaches to help sustain an acceptable level of social performance (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Power(Lessness) of Industry Self-Regulation to Promote Responsible Labor Standards: Insights From the Chinese Toy Industry.Nick Lin-Hi & Igor Blumberg - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 143 (4):789-805.
    The provision of responsible labor standards along the entire value chain poses considerable challenges for corporations. In particular, management shortcomings and institutional deficits—which are partly related to cultural issues—frequently impede the realization of responsible business practices in emerging and developing countries. It is widely established in theory that industry self-regulation constitutes a particularly promising approach for overcoming these challenges. Nonetheless, it is still an open question as to whether industry initiatives effectively promote responsible standards in practice. This contribution aims to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Improving Social Responsibility in RMG Industries Through a New Governance Approach in Laws.Mia Rahim - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 143 (4):807-826.
    Developing countries need to reform legislation to ensure the global supply firms in ready-made garment industry is adequately addressing obligations of social responsibility. Literature typically focuses on strategies for raising responsible standards in global buying firms within the RMG industry, but fails to focus on implementing strategies for suppliers in developing countries. This article addresses this gap by specifically focusing on the RMG industry in Bangladesh, the home of the third largest RMG supplier in the world. It concentrates on analysing (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Labour Standards in Global Value Chains in India: The Case of Handknotted Carpet Manufacturing Cluster.S. Singh & Amit Giri - 2016 - Asian Journal of Business Ethics 5 (1 - 2):37-52.
    India is a major producer and exporter of hand-knotted carpets to the world since the beginning of the British rule over India. Majority of the hand-knotted carpets exported from India are produced in the Bhadohi-Mirzapur region, popularly called as the carpet belt of India. Given deplorable working conditions and very high prevalence of child labour in the cluster, in the mid-1990, four social labels were implemented to improve the labour standards, in addition to slew of labour laws implemented by the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Marketing’s Consequences: Stakeholder Marketing and Supply Chain Corporate Social Responsibility Issues.C. B. Bhattacharya - 2010 - Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (4):617-641.
    While considerable attention has been given to the harm done to consumers by marketing, less attention has been given to the harm done by consumers as an indirect effect of marketing activities, particularly in regard to supply chains. The recent development of dramatically expanded global supply chains has resulted in social and environmental problems upstream that are attributable at least in part to downstream marketers and consumers. Marketers have responded mainly by using corporate social responsibility (CSR) communication to counter the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Business Ethics and Finance in Greater China: Synthesis and Future Directions in Sustainability, CSR, and Fraud.Douglas Cumming, Wenxuan Hou & Edward Lee - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 138 (4):601-626.
    Following the financial crisis and recent recession, the center of gravity of global economic growth and competitiveness is shifting toward emerging economies. As a leading and increasingly influential emerging economy, China is currently attracting the attention of academics, practitioners, and policy makers. There has been an increase in research interest in and publications on issues relating to China within high-quality international academic journals. We therefore organized a special issue conference in conjunction with the Journal of Business Ethics in Lhasa, Tibet, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Corporate Social Responsibility Through a Feminist Lens: Domestic Violence and the Workplace in the 21st Century.Alice de Jonge - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 148 (3):471-487.
    Domestic violence is a serious issue, and the costs for business of failing to address the impacts of domestic violence in the workplace are high. New technologies and economic shifts towards services sector industries are fast dissolving the boundaries between the workplace and the home in many national labor markets. Moreover, companies are now expected to meet higher standards of behavior in fulfilling their responsibilities to employees and wider society. These developments present challenges for ethical reasoning about the limits of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Workplace Dignity in a Total Institution: Examining the Experiences of Foxconn’s Migrant Workforce. [REVIEW]Kristen Lucas, Dongjing Kang & Zhou Li - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 114 (1):91-106.
    In 2010, a cluster of suicides at the electronics manufacturing giant Foxconn Technology Group sparked worldwide outcry about working conditions at its factories in China. Within a few short months, 14 young migrant workers jumped to their deaths from buildings on the Foxconn campus, an all-encompassing compound where they had worked, eaten, and slept. Even though the language of workplace dignity was invoked in official responses from Foxconn and its business partner Apple, neither of these parties directly examined workers’ dignity (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Sustainable Supply Chains: Governance Mechanisms to Greening Suppliers. [REVIEW]Cristina Gimenez & Vicenta Sierra - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 116 (1):189-203.
    One of the key challenges for firms is to manage sustainability along the supply chain. To extend sustainability to suppliers, organizations have developed different governance mechanisms. The aim of this paper is to analyze the effectiveness of two different mechanisms (i.e., supplier assessment and collaboration with suppliers) to improve one dimension of sustainability: environmental performance. Structural Equation Modeling and cluster analysis were used to analyze the relationships between supplier assessment, collaboration with suppliers, and environmental performance. The results suggest that (1) (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • From Resistance to Opportunity-Seeking: Strategic Responses to Institutional Pressures for Corporate Social Responsibility in the Nordic Fashion Industry.Esben Rahbek Gjerdrum Pedersen & Wencke Gwozdz - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 119 (2):245-264.
    Using survey responses from 400 fashion companies in Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Iceland, we examine the diversity of strategic responses to institutional pressures for corporate social responsibility within the Nordic fashion industry. We also develop and test a new model of strategic responses to institutional pressures that encompasses both resistance and opportunity-seeking behaviour. Our results suggest that it is inconsistent pressures within, rather than between, stakeholder groups that shape strategic responses to CSR pressures and that increasing pressures stimulates opportunity-seeking (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Private Regulation and Trade Union Rights: Why Codes of Conduct Have Limited Impact on Trade Union Rights.Niklas Egels-Zandén & Jeroen Merk - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 123 (3):1-13.
    Codes of conduct are the main tools to privately regulate worker rights in global value chains. Scholars have shown that while codes may improve outcome standards (such as occupational health and safety), they have had limited impact on process rights (such as freedom of association and collective bargaining). Scholars have, though, only provided vague or general explanations for this empirical finding. We address this shortcoming by providing a holistic and detailed explanation, and argue that codes, in their current form, have (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Labour Leverage in Global Value Chains: The Role of Interdependencies and Multi-Level Dynamics.Christina Niforou - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 130 (2):301-311.
    The global segmentation of production and distribution has resulted in highly complex global value chains where vertical and horizontal dynamics are equally important in determining working conditions and providing points of leverage for labour. Borrowing notions of multi-level governance, we propose an analytical framework for describing and explaining success and failure of labour agency when attempting to improve working conditions along GVCs. Our starting point is that the high complexity of GVCs and the absence of a global overarching authority have (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Corporate Social Responsibility in Garment Sourcing Networks: Factory Management Perspectives on Ethical Trade in Sri Lanka.Patsy Perry, Steve Wood & John Fernie - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 130 (3):737-752.
    With complex buyer-driven global production networks and a labour-intensive manufacturing process, the fashion industry has become a focal point for debates on the social responsibility of business. Utilising an interview methodology with influential actors from seven export garment manufacturers in Sri Lanka, we explore the situated knowledge at one nodal point of the production network. We conceptualise factory management perspectives on the implementation of corporate social responsibility in terms of the strategic balancing of ethical considerations against the commercial pressures of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • The Relationship Between Individuals’ Recognition of Human Rights and Responses to Socially Responsible Companies: Evidence From Russia and Bulgaria.Petya Puncheva-Michelotti, Marco Michelotti & Peter Gahan - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 93 (4):583-605.
    An emerging body of literature has highlighted a gap in our understanding of the extent to which the salience attached to human rights is likely to influence the extent to which an individual takes account of Corporate Social Responsibility in decision making. The primary aim of this study is to begin to address this gap by understanding how individuals attribute different emphasis on specific aspects of human rights when making decisions to purchase, work, invest or support the community operations for (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Implementing Socially Sustainable Practices in Challenging Institutional Contexts: Building Theory From Seven Developing Country Supplier Cases.Fahian Anisul Huq & Mark Stevenson - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (2):415-442.
    The implementation of socially sustainable practices in suppliers situated in challenging institutional contexts is examined using institutional theory, both in terms of how institutional pressures affect implementation and what explains the decoupling of practices from the day-to-day reality. A multi-case study approach is employed based on seven apparel industry suppliers in Bangladesh. Cross-case analysis highlights the coercive, mimetic, and normative pressures on suppliers to implement socially sustainable practices. A key pressure identified that has not previously been highlighted in the literature (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Sourcing in an Increasingly Expensive China: Four Swedish Cases. [REVIEW]Tony Fang, Caroline Gunterberg & Emma Larsson - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 97 (1):119 - 138.
    China has long enjoyed its position as the world's cheapest production country. However, this position is being shaken due to the increasingly rising costs in China in pace with China's rapid economic development. China's New Labour Contract Law which took effect from 1 January 2008 has further pushed the labour costs in China in general. The purpose of this article is to arrive at an in-depth understanding of why foreign firms conduct sourcing in China where sourcing is becoming increasingly expensive. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Corporate Responsibility Standards: Current Implications and Future Possibilities for Peace Through Commerce.Charles P. Koerber - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (S4):461 - 480.
    Calls for greater corporate responsibility have resulted in the creation of various extralegal mechanisms to shape corporate behavior. The number and popularity of corporate responsibility standards has grown tremendously in the last three decades. Current estimates suggest there may be over 300 standards that address various aspects of corporate behavior and responsibility (e. g., working conditions, human rights, protection of the natural environment, transparency, bribery). However, little is known about how these standards relate directly to the notion of peace through (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Social Sustainability in Selecting Emerging Economy Suppliers.Matthias Ehrgott, Felix Reimann, Lutz Kaufmann & Craig R. Carter - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 98 (1):99-119.
    Despite the growing public awareness of social sustainability issues, little is known about what drives firms to emphasize social criteria in their supplier management practices and what the precise benefits of such efforts are. This is especially true for relationships with international suppliers from the world's emerging economies in Asia, Latin America, and Eastern Europe. Building on stakeholder theory, we address the issue by examining how pressures from customers, the government, and employees as primary constituencies of the firm determine the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • The Contribution of Environmental and Social Standards Towards Ensuring Legitimacy in Supply Chain Governance.Martin Mueller, Virginia Gomes dos Santos & Stefan Seuring - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (4):509-523.
    Increasingly, companies implement social and environmental standards as instruments towards corporate social responsibility in supply chains. This is based on the assumption that such standards increase legitimacy among stakeholders. Yet, a wide variety of standards with different requirement levels exist and companies might tend to introduce the ones with low exigencies, using them as a legitimacy front. This strategy jeopardizes the reputation of social and environmental standards among stakeholders and their long-term trust in these instruments of CSR, meaning that all (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  • The Relationship Between Individuals' Recognition of Human Rights and Responses to Socially Responsible Companies: Evidence From Russia and Bulgaria. [REVIEW]Petya Puncheva-Michelotti, Marco Michelotti & Peter Gahan - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 93 (4):583 - 605.
    An emerging body of literature has highlighted a gap in our understanding of the extent to which the salience attached to human rights is likely to influence the extent to which an individual takes account of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in decision making. The primary aim of this study is to begin to address this gap by understanding how individuals attribute different emphasis on specific aspects of human rights when making decisions to purchase, work, invest or support the community operations (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Barriers Against Globalizing Corporate Ethics: An Analysis of Legal Disputes on Implementing U.S. Codes of Ethics in Germany.Till Talaulicar - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 84 (S3):349-360.
    Global firms need to decide on the correspondence between their corporate ethics and the globalization of their activities. When firms go global, they face ethical complexities as they operate in different legal and cultural environments that may impact the admissibility and appropriateness of their approach to institutionalize and implement corporate ethics. Global firms may have good reasons to establish global codes of ethics that are to be obeyed by all employees worldwide. However, developing and implementing such codes can be rather (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Roche’s Clinical Trials with Organs From Prisoners: Does Profit Trump Morals?Judith Schrempf-Stirling - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 121 (2):315-328.
    This case study discusses the economic, legal, and ethical considerations for conducting clinical trials in a controversial context. In 2010, pharmaceutical giant Roche received a shame award by the Swiss non-governmental organization Berne Declaration and Greenpeace for conducting clinical trials with organs taken from executed prisoners in China. The company respected local regulations and industry ethical standards. However, medical associations condemned organs from executed prisoners on moral grounds. Human rights organizations demanded that Roche ended its clinical trials in China immediately. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Rising Power Clusters and the Challenges of Local and Global Standards.Peter Knorringa & Khalid Nadvi - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 133 (1):55-72.
    This paper explores the intersection between three processes associated with globalisation. First, the rise of emerging economies like China, Brazil and India, the so-called ‘Rising Powers’, and their potential to define the contours of globalisation, global production arrangements and global governance in the twenty-first century. Second, the importance of corporate social responsibility goals in the shaping of global trade rules and industrial practices. Third, the significance of small firm clusters as critical sites of industrial competitiveness. Some of the most significant (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Mandated Social Disclosure: An Analysis of the Response to the California Transparency in Supply Chains Act of 2010.Rachel N. Birkey, Ronald P. Guidry, Mohammad Azizul Islam & Dennis M. Patten - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 152 (3):827-841.
    In this study, we examine investor and firm response to the California Transparency in Supply Chains Act of 2010. The CTSCA requires large retail and manufacturing firms to disclose efforts to eradicate slavery and human trafficking from their supply chains and is a rare example of mandated corporate social responsibility disclosure. Based on a sample of 105 retail companies subject to the CTSCA, we find a significant negative market reaction to the passing of the CTSCA. Furthermore, we find that the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Ethical Sourcing: An Analysis of the Literature and Implications for Future Research.Seongtae Kim, Claudia Colicchia & David Menachof - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 152 (4):1033-1052.
    The purpose of this study is to present a rigorous, focused review on how this field of ethical sourcing research has grown and evolved over the decades, providing implications for future research. We combine two research methodologies in this study: a systematic literature review and a citation network analysis. The former is used as a scientific tool to select the most relevant ethical sourcing articles, while the latter is then applied as a research technique to analyse these selected articles. Such (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Instrumental and/or Deliberative? A Typology of CSR Communication Tools.Peter Seele & Irina Lock - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 131 (2):401-414.
    Addressing the critique that communication activities with regard to CSR are often merely instrumental marketing or public relation tools, this paper develops a toolbox of CSR communication that takes into account a deliberative notion. We derive this toolbox classification from the political approach of CSR that is based on Habermasian discourse ethics and show that it has a communicative core. Therefore, we embed CSR communication within political CSR theory and extend it by Habermasian communication theory, particularly the four validity claims (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • The Good, the Bad and the Ugly: Dialogical Ethics and Market Information. [REVIEW]Dennis A. Kopf, David Boje & Ivonne M. Torres - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 94 (S2):285 - 297.
    We apply dialogism to ethical thought to form a theory of Dialogical Ethics (DE). Specifically, DE is defined as the interplay between four historic ethical traditions: Formal (Kantian) Ethics, Content-Sense (Utilitarian) Ethics, Answerability Ethics, and Value/Virtue (Story) Ethics. On a broader level, DE can be understood as the interplay between the ethical ideas of society. We then use DE to analyze a number of problems in business including sweatshop labor and environmental degradation. To counteract these injustices, we propose two recommendations: (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Differences in Organizing Between Unions and NGOs: Conflict and Cooperation Among Swedish Unions and NGOs.Niklas Egels-Zandén & Peter Hyllman - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 101 (2):249-261.
    The protection of workers' rights is at the heart of the ongoing debate on business ethics. In balancing transnational corporations' (TNCs) influence in private regulatory systems intended to protect workers' rights in emerging economies, several authors have emphasized the importance of cooperative relationships between unions and NGOs. In practice, however, conflict has often entered into union-NGO relations, weakening the protection of workers' rights. We argue that cooperative union-NGO relationships are difficult to form in part because of the differences existing between (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Cognitive Processes in the CSR Decision-Making Process: A Sensemaking Perspective.Ulf H. Richter & Felix F. Arndt - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 148 (3):587-602.
    Applying the sensemaking perspective in the field of corporate social responsibility is a recent but promising development. Using an in-depth exploratory case study, we analyze and discuss the CSR character of British American Tobacco Switzerland. Our findings indicate that BAT Switzerland does not follow traditional patters of building CSR. BAT Switzerland can be classified as a “legitimacy seeker,” characterized mainly by a relational identity orientation and legitimation strategies that might provide pragmatic and/or cognitive legitimacy. We conclude that understanding the cognitive (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Management of Social Issues in Supply Chains: A Literature Review Exploring Social Issues, Actions and Performance Outcomes.Sadaat Ali Yawar & Stefan Seuring - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 141 (3):621-643.
    The social dimension of sustainable development and its impact on supply chains have so far received less attention than the environmental dimension. The aim of the research is to explore the intersection between social issues, corporate social responsibility actions and performance outcomes. A structured literature review of social issues in supply chains is presented, analysing the research published so far in peer-reviewed publications. Linking CSR and supply chain management allows the exploration of strategies and performance outcomes with a focus on (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations