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Phaedrus

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Cambridge University Press (1956)

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  1. Nietzsche: Bipolar Disorder and Creativity.Eva M. Cybulska - 2019 - Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 19 (1):53-65.
    This essay, the last in a series, focuses on the relationship between Nietzsche’s mental illness and his philosophical art. It is predicated upon my original diagnosis of his mental condition as bipolar affective disorder, which began in early adulthood and continued throughout his creative life. The kaleidoscopic mood shifts allowed him to see things from different perspectives and may have imbued his writings with passion rarely encountered in philosophical texts. At times hovering on the verge of psychosis, Nietzsche was able (...)
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  • Smart Screens and Transformative Ways of Looking: Towards a Therapeutics of Desire.Anna Kouppanou - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 51 (14):1423-1433.
    In this article, I set up a Heideggerian framework of research in order to investigate the phenomenon of looking at the smartphone screen, focusing especially on the desire to look, which I see as intricately connected with the desire to know and the desire to be. With a clear phenomenological disposition, supplemented by a deconstructive look via Giorgio Agamben and Bernard Stiegler, I turn to Ovid’s Metamorphoses, and especially to his myth of Narcissus, and to Lacan’s theory of the formation (...)
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  • Heidegger in the Machine: The Difference Between Techne and Mechane.Todd S. Mei - 2016 - Continental Philosophy Review 49 (3):267-292.
    Machines are often employed in Heidegger’s philosophy as instances to illustrate specific features of modern technology. But what is it about machines that allows them to fulfill this role? This essay argues there is a unique ontological force to the machine that can be understood when looking at distinctions between techne and mechane in ancient Greek sources and applying these distinctions to a reading of Heidegger’s early thought on equipment and later thought on poiesis. Especially with respect to Heidegger’s appropriation (...)
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  • A Splitting “Mind-Ache”: Challenge to Kantian Self-Legislation.Reshef Agam-Segal - 2013 - Journal of Philosophical Research 38:43-68.
    I problematize the notion of self-legislation. I follow in Elizabeth Anscombe’s footsteps and suggest that on a plausible reading of Kant, he does not so much misidentify the sources of moral normativity, as fail to identify any such sources in the first place: The set of terms with which the Kantian is attempting to do so is confused. Interpreters today take Kant’s legal language to be merely metaphorical. The language of ‘self-legislation,’ in particular, is replaced by such interpreters with a (...)
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  • Why Alief is Not a Legitimate Psychological Category.Hans Muller & Bana Bashour - 2011 - Journal of Philosophical Research 36:371-389.
    We defend the view that belief is a psychological category against a recent attempt to recast it as a normative one. Tamar Gendler has argued that to properly understand how beliefs function in the regulation and production of action, we need to contrast beliefs with a class of psychological states and processes she calls “aliefs.” We agree with Gendler that affective states as well as habits and instincts deserve more attention than they receive in the contemporary philosophical psychology literature. But (...)
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  • Cyber Citizen or Cyborg Citizen: Baudrillard, Political Agency, and the Commons in Virtual Politics.Andrew Koch - 2005 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 20 (2-3):159-175.
    The ethical commitment to democracy requires creating the public space for a rational discourse among real alternatives by the population. In this article, I argue that the Internet fails in this task on 2 fronts. Inspired by the work of Jean Baudrillard, the work argues that the Internet reinforces a structure of passive political agents through its 1-way form of communication. The Internet is designed to deliver political text, not engage the public in dialogue about the direction of collective decision (...)
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  • Nietzsche and Amor Fati.Béatrice Han-Pile - 2011 - European Journal of Philosophy 19 (2):224-261.
    Abstract: This paper identifies two central paradoxes threatening the notion of amor fati [love of fate]: it requires us to love a potentially repellent object (as fate entails significant negativity for us) and this, in the knowledge that our love will not modify our fate. Thus such love may seem impossible or pointless. I analyse the distinction between two different sorts of love (eros and agape) and the type of valuation they involve (in the first case, the object is loved (...)
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  • The Fertility of Dialogue: Levinas and Plato on Education.Rebecca Glenn Scott - 2015 - PhaenEx 10:13.
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  • A View From Somewhere: Explaining the Paradigms of Educational Research.Hanan A. Alexander - 2006 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 40 (2):205–221.
    In this paper I ask how educational researchers can believe the subjective perceptions of qualitative participant-observers given the concern for objectivity and generalisability of experimental research in the behavioural and social sciences. I critique the most common answer to this question within the educational research community, which posits the existence of two (or more) equally legitimate epistemological paradigms—positivism and constructivism—and offer an alternative that places a priority in educational research on understanding the purposes and meanings humans attribute to educational practices. (...)
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  • Britishness, Belonging and the Ideology of Conflict: Lessons From the Polis.Derek Edyvane - 2011 - Philosophy of Education 45 (1):75-93.
    A central aspiration of the ‘Britishness’ agenda in UK politics is to promote community through the teaching of British values in schools. The agenda's justification depends in part on the suppositions that harmony arising from agreement on certain values is a necessary condition of social health and that conflict arising from pluralism connotes a form of dysfunction in social life. These perceptions of harmony and conflict are traceable to the ancient Greeks. Plato used the device of the soul-city analogy to (...)
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  • Allowing the Biblical Text to Do its Pedagogical Work: Connecting Interpretative Activity and Moral Education.Elie Holzer - 2007 - Journal of Moral Education 36 (4):497-514.
    Drawing upon scholarly literary approaches to biblical narratives, this article offers both a theoretical view and a method for teaching and learning which connect interpretative activity of biblical narratives with moral education. The theoretical section of the article discusses the pedagogical rather than propositional nature of biblical narratives and illustrates how the former is mediated through calculated literary devices in the text. The article then attends to the experiential nature of the interpretative dynamic between learner and text, with special attention (...)
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  • Public Relations Ethics: Contrasting Models From the Rhetorics of Plato, Aristotle, and Isocrates.Charles Marsh - 2001 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 16 (2-3):78-98.
    As a relatively young profession, public relations seeks a realistic ethics foundation. A continuing debate in public relations has pitted journalistic/objectivity ethics against the advocacy ethics that may be more appropriate in an adversarial society. As the journalistic/objectivity influence has waned, the debate has evolved, pitting the advocacy/adversarial foundation against the two-way symmetrical model of public relations, which seeks to build consensus and holds that an organization itself, not an opposing public, sometimes may need to change to build a productive (...)
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  • Revisiting Dialogues and Monologues.Tone Kvernbekk - 2012 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (9):966-978.
    In educational discourse dialogue tends to be viewed as being (morally) superior to monologue. When we look at them as basic forms of communication, we find that dialogue is a two-way, one-to-one form and monologue is a one-way, one-to-many form. In this paper I revisit the alleged (moral) superiority of dialogue. First, I problematize certain normative features of dialogue, most notably reciprocity. Here I use Socrates as my example (the Phaedrus). Second, I discuss monologue, using Jesus as my example (St. (...)
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  • Signal Event Context: Trace Technologies of the Habit@Online.Robert Luke - 2003 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 35 (3):333–348.
  • Friendship in Education and the Desire for the Good: An Interpretation of Plato's Phaedrus.D. P. E. Muir - 2000 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 32 (2):233–247.
  • Metaphysical Desire in Girard and Plato.Sherwood Belangia - 2010 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 2 (2):197-209.
    In Deceit, Desire, and the Novel, René Girard interprets a phenomenon he dubs “metaphysical desire” in which “metaphysical” signifies objects of attraction that are not physical things but rather intangible bi-products of mimetic entanglement—such as prestige or fame or social status. These “metaphysical objects” fuel the sometimes frenzied rivalry between the actors in their grip. Desire in the mimetic theory is always subject to mediation, and Girard distinguishes two modes of mediation: external and internal. In external mediation, the model stands (...)
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  • Schadenfreude in Sport: Envy, Justice, and Self-Esteem.Mike McNamee - 2003 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 30 (1):1-16.
  • Aristotelian Ethos and the New Orality: Implications for Media Literacy and Media Ethics.Charles Marsh - 2006 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 21 (4):338 – 352.
    Modern converged mass media, particularly television and the World Wide Web, may be fostering a new orality in opposition to traditional alphabetical literacy. Scholars of orality and literacy maintain that oral cultures feature reduced levels of critical assessment of media messages. An analysis of Aristotle's description of ethos, as presented in that philosopher's Rhetoric, suggests that an oral culture can foster media that deliver selective truths, or even lies, thus ranking poorly in hierarchical ethical schemata such as those developed by (...)
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  • Graphic Understanding: Instruments and Interpretation in Robert Hooke's Micrographia.Michael Aaron Dennis - 1989 - Science in Context 3 (2):309-364.
  • Kierkegaard and the Search for Self‐Knowledge.Daniel Watts - 2013 - European Journal of Philosophy 21 (4):525-549.
    In the first part of this essay (Sections I and II), I argue that Kierkegaard's work helps us to articulate and defend two basic requirements on searching for knowledge of one's own judgements: first, that searching for knowledge whether one judges that P requires trying to make a judgement whether P; and second that, in an important range of cases, searching for knowledge of one's own judgements requires attending to how one's acts of judging are performed. In the second part (...)
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  • Pourquoi des dieux égyptiens chez Platon?Aikaterini Lefka - 1994 - Kernos 7:159-168.
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  • Belief-Revision, the Ramsey Test, Monotonicity, and the so-Called Impossibility Results.Neil Tennant - 2008 - Review of Symbolic Logic 1 (4):402-423.
    Peter G¨ ardenfors proved a theorem purporting to show that it is impossible to adjoin to the AGM -postulates for belief-revision a principle of monotonicity for revisions. The principle of monotonicity in question is implied by the Ramsey test for conditionals. So G¨.
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  • Perception and Dialectic.Eleanor M. Shapiro - 1978 - Human Studies 1 (1):245 - 267.
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  • The Paradox of Virtuosity in the Practical Arts.Neil C. M. Brown - 2004 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 36 (1):19–34.
  • Hegelian Madness? Nikolaj Fëdorov’s Repudiation of History.Jeff Love - 2013 - Studies in East European Thought 65 (3-4):201-212.
  • Epilogue.Jesús Ilundáin-Agurruza - 2014 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 8 (4):567-572.
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  • The Play of Socratic Dialogue.Richard Smith - 2011 - Philosophy of Education 45 (2):221-233.
    Proponents of philosophy for children generally see themselves as heirs to the ‘Socratic’ tradition. They often claim too that children's aptitude for play leads them naturally to play with abstract, philosophical ideas. However in Plato's dialogues we find in the mouth of ‘Socrates’ many warnings against philosophising with the young. Those dialogues also question whether philosophy should be playful in any straightforward way, casting the distinction between play and seriousness as unstable. It seems we cannot think of Plato as representing (...)
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  • A Theory of Knowledge.J. Pachner - 1984 - Foundations of Physics 14 (11):1107-1120.
    In order to make reliable predictions in any region of human activity, it is necessary to distinguish clearly what is based on experience and what is a construction of intellect. The theory of knowledge developed in the present paper is an attempt to devise a set of axioms that demarcate experience, as the only source of our knowledge of the external world, from the ideas, scientific models, and theories by means of which the scientific predictions are made. After a discussion (...)
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  • Icarus Falling: Re‐Imagining Educational Theory.Anne Pirrie - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 49 (4):525-538.
    This article offers a critique of the notion of ‘capacity building’ in educational theory. Are the intentions behind the latter enterprise as benign and altruistic as they first appear? How is the term ‘capacity building’ to be understood? The article presents a radical and daring alternative for re-invigorating educational research that foregrounds the ethical engagement of the researcher by exploring the expressive, cognitive and imaginative possibilities of language. Drawing on the Calvino's idea of the ‘lightness of thoughtfulness’, I suggest that (...)
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  • Is There an Ethics of Diabolical Evil? Sex Scandals, Family Romance, and Love in the School & Academy.Jan Jagodzinski - 2006 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 25 (5-6):335-362.
    This essay attempts to examine the difficult question of sex scandals both in public school settings and in the academy. It raises issues over the way authority in the classroom is unequally exercised by both male and female teachers in terms of power and seduction. However, the Law remains explicit when it comes to judging who is at fault within a-student relationship that collapses into the bedroom. The ethics that surround such sexual affairs is raised through the psychoanalytic and philosophical (...)
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  • Love as a Contested Concept.Richard Paul Hamilton - 2006 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 36 (3):239–254.
    Theorists about love typically downplay the scale of persistent and possibly intractable disagreement about love. Where they have considered such disagreements at all, they have tended to treat them as an example of the lack of clarity surrounding the concept of love, a problem which can be resolved by philosophical analysis. In doing so, they invariably slip into prescriptive mode and offer moral injunctions in the guise of conceptual analyses.This article argues for philosophical modesty. I propose that the starting point (...)
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  • Taking Sides: Science, Language, and Debate After Derrida, Searle, and Alan Gross.Joan Leach - 1994 - Social Epistemology 8 (4):361 – 372.
  • The Rainbow of Emotions: At the Crossroads of Neurobiology and Phenomenology. [REVIEW]Natalie Depraz - 2008 - Continental Philosophy Review 41 (2):237-259.
    This contribution seeks to explicitly articulate two directions of a continuous phenomenal field: (1) the genesis of intersubjectivity in its bodily basis (both organic and phylogenetic); and (2) the re-investment of the organic basis (both bodily and cellular) as a self-transcendence. We hope to recast the debate about the explanatory gap by suggesting a new way to approach the mind-body and Leib/Körper problems: with a heart-centered model instead of a brain-centered model. By asking how the physiological dynamics of heart and (...)
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  • Rereading Sophistical Arguments: A Political Intervention. [REVIEW]Jane Sutton - 1991 - Argumentation 5 (2):141-157.
    This essay argues that Aristotle's categories of oratory are not as useful in judging the methods of Sophistical rhetoric as his presentation of time. The Sophistical argumentative method of “making the weaker the stronger case” is re-evaluated as a political practice. After showing this argument's relation to power and ideology, Aristotle's philosophy, which privileges a procedure of argument consistent with the politics of a polis-ideal rhetoric, is offered as reason for objecting to Sophistical rhetoric. The essay concludes that Sophistical rhetoric (...)
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  • Sorcerer Love: A Reading of Plato's Symposium, Diotima's Speech.Luce Irigaray & Eleanor H. Kuykendall - 1988 - Hypatia 3 (3):32-44.
    "Sorcerer Love" is the name that Luce Irigaray gives to the demonic function of love as presented in Plato's Symposium. She argues that Socrates there attributes two incompatible positions to Diotima, who in any case is not present at the banquet. The first is that love is a mid-point or intermediary between lovers which also teaches immortality. The second is that love is a means to the end and duty of procreation, and thus is a mere means to immortality through (...)
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  • Cicero, Ambrose, and Aquinas “on Duties”or the Limits of Genre in Morals.Mark D. Jordan - 2005 - Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (3):485-502.
    To compose a Christian book on exemplary Christian living, Ambrose appropriates and criticizes Cicero's book on "duties," "De officiis." In many passages within the moral part of his "Summa of Theology," Thomas Aquinas incorporates quotations from both Cicero and Ambrose. Comparison of the three texts raises issues about the relation of genres to terms, arguments, rules, and ideals in religious teaching. Genre becomes a useful category for analyzing religious rhetoric only when it is conceived as a set of persuasive or (...)
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  • Moral Objectivity and Responsibility in Ethics: A Socratic Response to Hume's Legacy in the 20th Century.Owen Anderson - 2010 - Heythrop Journal 51 (2):178-191.
  • Enunciation Squared.Darren Tofts - 2009 - Angelaki 14 (1):155 – 164.
  • Body-Extension Versus Body-Incorporation: Is There a Need for a Body-Model? [REVIEW]Helena De Preester & Manos Tsakiris - 2009 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (3):307-319.
    This paper investigates the role of a pre-existing body-model that is an enabling constraint for the incorporation of objects into the body. This body-model is also a basis for the distinction between body extensions (e.g., in the case of tool-use) and incorporation (e.g., in the case of successful prosthesis use). It is argued that, in the case of incorporation, changes in the sense of body-ownership involve a reorganization of the body-model, whereas extension of the body with tools does not involve (...)
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  • The Deep Bodily Roots of Emotion.Albert A. Johnstone - 2012 - Husserl Studies 28 (3):179-200.
    This article explores emotions and their relationship to ‘somatic responses’, i.e., one’s automatic responses to sensations of pain, cold, warmth, sudden intensity. To this end, it undertakes a Husserlian phenomenological analysis of the first-hand experience of eight basic emotions, briefly exploring their essential aspects: their holistic nature, their identifying dynamic transformation of the lived body, their two-layered intentionality, their involuntary initiation and voluntary espousal. The fact that the involuntary tensional shifts initiating emotions are irreplicatable voluntarily, is taken to show that (...)
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  • The First Sophists and Feminism: Discourses of the "Other".Susan C. Jarratt - 1990 - Hypatia 5 (1):27 - 41.
    In this essay, I explore the parallel between the historical exclusions of rhetoric from philosophy and of women from fields of rational discourse. After considering the usefulness and limitations of deconstruction for exposing marginalization by hierarchical systems, I explore links between texts of the sophists and feminist proposals for rewriting/rereading history by Cixous, Spivak, and others. I conclude that sophistic rhetoric offers a flexible alternative to philosophy as an intellectual framework for mediating theoretical oppositions among contemporary feminisms.
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  • The First Sophists and Feminism: Discourses of the “Other”.Susan C. Jarratt - 1990 - Hypatia 5 (1):27-41.
    In this essay, I explore the parallel between the historical exclusions of rhetoric from philosophy and of women from fields of rational discourse. After considering the usefulness and limitations of deconstruction for exposing marginalization by hierarchical systems, I explore links between texts of the sophists and feminist proposals for rewriting/rereading history by Cixous, Spivak, and others. I conclude that sophistic rhetoric offers a flexible alternative to philosophy as an intellectual framework for mediating theoretical oppositions among contemporary feminisms.
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  • Agency, Freedom, and the Blessings of Opacity.Edwin C. Laurenson - 2011 - Zygon 46 (1):111-120.
    Abstract: How can the decisions of “autonomous” individuals provide a rationale for freedom and self-governance if a mechanical and causal sense of the self leads us to question the foundational nature of the individual? If most of our decisions originate in brain function below the level of consciousness, we live in a virtual world produced by mechanisms outside our control, arising from transparent self-models of which we are not aware. “Opacity,” the gift of not perceiving directly, of not automatically believing (...)
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  • Sorcerer Love: A Reading of Plato's Symposium, Diotima's Speech.Luce Irigaray & Eleanor H. Kuykendall - 1989 - Hypatia 3 (3):32 - 44.
    "Sorcerer Love" is the name that Luce Irigaray gives to the demonic function of love as presented in Plato's Symposium. She argues that Socrates there attributes two incompatible positions to Diotima, who in any case is not present at the banquet. The first is that love is a mid-point or intermediary between lovers which also teaches immortality. The second is that love is a means to the end and duty of procreation, and thus is a mere means to immortality through (...)
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  • On Holism and The Contextual Character of Natural Qualities.Vuk Uskoković - 2012 - World Futures 68 (6):406 - 429.
    Presented is a discourse on the contextual nature of physical qualities. The realistic and observational contexts in which a system exists are demonstrated as equally involved in defining its qualities. Each quality could be consequently considered as natural and experiential at the same time. The subsequently proposed thesis of the contextual co-definition of natural/experiential qualities in the relationship between the human mind and Nature is shown to possess numerous favorable ethical and aesthetical implications. The contextual nature of experiential qualities is (...)
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  • The Meaning of Graceful Movement.Christopher Cordner - 2003 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 30 (2):132-143.
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  • Cognition and Emotionover Twenty-Five Years.Keith Oatley, W. Gerrod Parrott, Craig Smith & Fraser Watts - 2011 - Cognition and Emotion 25 (8):1341-1348.