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Quantum theory and time asymmetry

Foundations of Physics 9 (11-12):803-818 (1979)

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  1. 'Many Minds' Interpretations of Quantum Mechanics.Michael Lockwood - 1996 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 47 (2):159-88.
  • Quantum/Classical Correspondence in the Light of Bell's Inequalities.Leonid A. Khalfin & Boris S. Tsirelson - 1992 - Foundations of Physics 22 (7):879-948.
    Instead of the usual asymptotic passage from quantum mechanics to classical mechanics when a parameter tended to infinity, a sharp boundary is obtained for the domain of existence of classical reality. The last is treated as separable empirical reality following d'Espagnat, described by a mathematical superstructure over quantum dynamics for the universal wave function. Being empirical, this reality is constructed in terms of both fundamental notions and characteristics of observers. It is presupposed that considered observers perceive the world as a (...)
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  • Empirical Reality, Empirical Causality, and the Measurement Problem.B. D'Espagnat - 1987 - Foundations of Physics 17 (5):507-529.
    Does physics describe anything that can meaningfully be called “independent reality,” or is it merely operational? Most physicists implicitly favor an intermediate standpoint, which takes quantum physics into account, but which nevertheless strongly holds fast to quite strictly realistic ideas about apparently “obvious facts” concerning the macro-objects. Part 1 of this article, which is a survey of recent measurement theories, shows that, when made explicit, the standpoint in question cannot be upheld. Part 2 brings forward a proposal for making minimal (...)
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  • Measurement in Bohm's Versus Everett's Quantum Theory.H. -D. Zeh - 1988 - Foundations of Physics 18 (7):723-730.
    The interpretations of measurements in Bohm's and Everett's quantum theories are compared. Since both theories are based on the assumption of a universally valid Schrödinger equation, they face the common problem of how to explain that arrow of time, which in conventional quantum theory is represented by the collapse of the wave function. Its solution requires, in a statistical sense, a very improbable initial condition for thetotal wave function of the universe. The historical importance of Bohm's quantum theory is pointed (...)
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