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  1. Corporate Compassion in Disaster Relief: Lessons From 2005 and 2010.Caddie Putnam Rankin, Harry Van Buren & Michelle Westermann-Behaylo - 2012 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 23:66-77.
    When natural disasters strike, a network of individuals, aid agencies, and corporations join together in a humanitarian effort to provide relief and recovery to those in need. Corporations, in particular, have played an increasing role in disaster assistance by providing financial support, goods, services, and logistic coordination. Previous research has addressed corporate responses to disaster by investigating the factors that impact the likelihood of giving. Instead of focusing on the likelihood of corporate action, or inaction, we address how different types (...)
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  • Does Ownership Matter? Firm Ownership and Corporate Illegality in China.Yongqiang Gao & Haibin Yang - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-15.
    This study explores whether or not a firm’s ownership status, as state-owned enterprise or private-owned enterprise, will influence its likelihood of engaging in illegality in China. We build our arguments on the institution-based view, positing that firms rationally pursue their interests in the distinct institutional context of China. Compared to SOEs, POEs have limited access to institutional resources, the lack of which threatens their development or even survival, forcing them to “break rules” to overcome institutional barriers. We thus suggest that (...)
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  • Finding the Ethics of “Red Capitalists”: Political Connection and Philanthropy of Chinese Private Entrepreneurs.Yuan Yang & Min Tang - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-15.
    In China, many private entrepreneurs have obtained political offices in the government. In this study, we argue that Chinese private entrepreneurs who are formally connected with government institutions, compared to other Chinese private entrepreneurs, tend to contribute more to philanthropic causes not only for instrumental concerns but also out of altruistic values. We submit this argument to an empirical test through a secondary data analysis of a representative sample of Chinese entrepreneurs collected by a coalition of government and industry groups. (...)
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  • Battling the Devolution in the Research on Corporate Philanthropy.Kellie Liket & Ana Simaens - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 126 (2):1-24.
    The conceptual literature increasingly portrays corporate philanthropy (CP) as an old-fashioned and ineffective operationalization of a firm’s corporate social responsibility. In contrast, empirical research indicates that corporations of all sizes, and both in developed and emerging economies, actively practice CP. This disadvantaged status of the concept, and research, on CP, complicates the advancement of our knowledge about the topic. In a systematic review of the literature containing 122 journal articles on CP, we show that this business practice is loaded with (...)
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  • Religion, the Nature of Ultimate Owner, and Corporate Philanthropic Giving: Evidence From China.Xingqiang Du, Wei Jian, Yingjie Du, Wentao Feng & Quan Zeng - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 123 (2):1-22.
    Using a sample of Chinese listed firms for the period of 2004–2010, this study examines the impact of religion on corporate philanthropic giving. Based on hand-collected data of religion and corporate philanthropic giving, we provide strong and robust evidence that religion is significantly positively associated with Chinese listed firms’ philanthropic giving. This finding is consistent with the view that religiosity has remarkable effects on individual thinking and behavior, and can serve as social norms to influence corporate philanthropy. Moreover, religion and (...)
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  • Corporate Philanthropy and Tunneling: Evidence From China.Jun Chen, Wang Dong, Jamie Tong & Feida Zhang - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (1):135-157.
    This paper examines the association between corporate philanthropy and tunneling by controlling shareholders. Using a unique dataset from China, the paper finds evidence that firms donating more are less likely to tunnel. The negative association between philanthropy and tunneling is stronger when firms are faced with more severe agency conflicts, as indicated by lower largest shareholding, fewer growth opportunities, lower state ownership, and weaker product market competition. The results suggest that companies engaging in philanthropy have incentives to enhance their reputations (...)
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  • Principal–Principal Conflicts and Corporate Philanthropy: Evidence From Chinese Private Firms.Sihai Li, Huiying Wu & Xianzhong Song - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 141 (3):605-620.
    The principal–principal perspective suggests that controlling shareholders have excessive influence on corporate philanthropy and may direct corporate funds to charitable causes to support their personal interests. Analysis of a sample of Chinese private firms listed on the Shenzhen or Shanghai stock exchange between 2004 and 2011 shows that there is a significant and negative relationship between corporate giving and the share held by the largest shareholders, suggesting that controlling shareholders are opportunistic in directing corporate charitable contributions; there is a significant (...)
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  • News Visibility and Corporate Philanthropic Response: Evidence From Privately Owned Chinese Firms Following the Wenchuan Earthquake.Zhe Zhang & Ming Jia - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 129 (1):93-114.
    Considerable interest exists regarding the media’s influence on corporate reactions, but the link between media visibility and corporate philanthropic response is not clear. Natural disasters thus provide an environment that makes visible the general processes relevant to that link. Based on agenda-setting theory, stakeholder theory, and impression-management theory, we propose that corporations that are highly visible in the news media are more likely to engage in CPR and donate more money. We also propose that companies with reputations for irresponsibility or (...)
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  • Critical Mass of Women on BODs, Multiple Identities, and Corporate Philanthropic Disaster Response: Evidence From Privately Owned Chinese Firms.Ming Jia & Zhe Zhang - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 118 (2):303-317.
    Although previous studies focus on the role of women in the boardroom and corporate response to natural disasters, none evaluate how women directors influence corporate philanthropic disaster response (CPDR). This study collects data on the philanthropic responses of privately owned Chinese firms to the Wenchuan earthquake of May 12, 2008, and the Yushu earthquake of April 14, 2010. We find that when at least three women serve on a board of directors (BOD), their companies’ responses to natural disasters are more (...)
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  • What Drives Managerial Perks? An Empirical Test of Competing Theoretical Perspectives.Hua Zhang, Yuanyang Song & Yuan Ding - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 132 (2):259-275.
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  • Corporate Philanthropy, Ownership Type, and Financial Transparency.Cuili Qian, Xinzi Gao & Albert Tsang - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 130 (4):851-867.
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  • Do Lenders Value Corporate Social Responsibility? Evidence From China.Kangtao Ye & Ran Zhang - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 104 (2):197-206.
    Drawing on risk mitigation theory, this article examines whether the improvement of firms’ social performance reduces debt financing costs (CDFs) in China, the world’s largest emerging market. Employing both the ordinary least square (OLS) and the two-stage instrumental variable regression methods, we find that improved corporate social responsibility (CSR) reduces the CDF when firms’ CSR investment is lower than an optimal level; however, this relationship is reversed after the CSR investment exceeds the optimal level. Firms with extremely low or extremely (...)
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  • Does Equity Ownership Matter for Corporate Social Responsibility? A Literature Review of Theories and Recent Empirical Findings.Christian M. Faller & Dodo zu Knyphausen-Aufseß - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (1):15-40.
    Based on the concept of shareholder primacy, many scholars have argued that it is more important for businesses to earn profits for their shareholders than to provide benefits to society at large. Corporate social responsibility is often regarded as an investment that comes at the expense of shareholders. In contrast, research analyzing the connections between the equity ownership structure of a company and its level of CSR engagement suggests that CSR offers benefits to shareholders that go beyond direct financial returns (...)
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  • Do Suppliers Applaud Corporate Social Performance?Min Zhang, Lijun Ma, Jun Su & Wen Zhang - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 121 (4):543-557.
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  • Corporate Philanthropy and Stock Price Crash Risk: Evidence From China.Min Zhang, Lu Xie & Haoran Xu - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 139 (3):595-617.
    How to mitigate stock price crash risk has become a focus in the theoretical and practical fields. Building on the work of Kim et al., this paper investigates the relation between corporate philanthropy and crash risk under the unique Chinese institutional background. The results show that both state ownership and the 2005 split share reform attenuate the mitigating effect of corporate philanthropy on crash risk. Specifically, the negative relation between corporate philanthropy and crash risk is less pronounced for state-owned enterprises (...)
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  • Donate Money, but Whose? An Empirical Study of Ultimate Control Rights, Agency Problems, and Corporate Philanthropy in China.Justin Tan & Yuejun Tang - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 134 (4):593-610.
    Using empirical evidence gathered from Chinese listed companies, this article explores the relationship between micro-governance mechanisms and corporate philanthropy from a corporate governance perspective. In China’s emerging market, ultimate controlling shareholders of state-owned enterprises are reluctant to donate their assets or resources to charitable organizations; in private enterprises marked by more deviation in voting and cash flow rights, such donations tend to be more likely. However, the ultimate controllers in PEs refuse to donate assets or resources they control or own, (...)
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  • A Study of Key Success Factors of Service Enterprises in China.Min Zhang, Biying Jin, G. Alan Wang, Thong Ngee Goh & Zhen He - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 134 (1):1-14.
    This paper reports a study of the key success factors of what have been recognized as successful service enterprises in China, each considered representative of its respective industry. The grounded theory approach was used to analyze information collected from these enterprises, resulting in the identification of the attributes shared by these enterprises: customer-oriented service, service management, service innovation, and corporate social responsibility. Based on these attributes, a survey was conducted to verify the relationships among these attributes and important outcomes, namely (...)
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  • Political Connection, Ownership Structure, and Corporate Philanthropy in China: A Strategic-Political Perspective.Huiying Wu, Xianzhong Song & Sihai Li - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 129 (2):399-411.
    This paper investigates whether philanthropic giving decisions and amount of charitable giving are related to firms’ political connections and ownership type. To this end, Chinese firms listed on either the Shenzhen or Shanghai stock exchange between 2004 and 2011 are examined, where government interference in the business sector is prevalent, state ownership structure is dominant, and corporate political connections prevail. Our analyses show a significant and positive relationship between political connections and the likelihood and extent of firm contributions; a significant (...)
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  • Opening the Black Box of CSR Decision Making: A Policy-Capturing Study of Charitable Donation Decisions in China.Shuo Wang, Yuhui Gao, Gerard P. Hodgkinson, Denise M. Rousseau & Patrick C. Flood - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 128 (3):665-683.
    This policy-capturing study, conducted in China, investigated the cognitive basis of managerial decisions to make a corporate charitable donation, a global issue in the context of corporate social responsibility research and practice. Participants responded to a series of scenarios manipulating pressure from the five stakeholders most commonly addressed by CSR research. The independent variables examined included organizational factors and the participants’ personal values. Results indicate a large positive effect of shareholder and governmental pressure on the decision with lesser positive effects (...)
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