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  1. Institutional Dynamics and Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in an Emerging Country Context: Evidence From China. [REVIEW]Juelin Yin & Yuli Zhang - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 111 (2):301-316.
    This study identifies unique corporate social responsibility (CSR) dimensions and develops a framework to analyze different levels of institutional dynamics in understanding CSR in China. Based on multiple case studies of 16 firms, the article examines the CSR philosophy and approach in China's emerging market. The findings suggest that Chinese CSR understanding is largely grounded in the context of ethical and discretionary actions. This focus is mainly attributed to the dominant role of ethical leadership, governmental dependency, and cultural traditions in (...)
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  • The Impact of Operational Diversity on Corporate Philanthropy: An Empirical Study of U.S. Companies. [REVIEW]Jean D. Kabongo, Kiyoung Chang & Ying Li - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 116 (1):49-65.
    This paper investigates the impact of diversity on corporate philanthropy. Compared to previous studies that have considered the influence of board diversity and CEO gender on corporate philanthropy, this study introduces the concept of operational diversity, which is the implementation of diversity programs at management, employee, and supply chain levels, and further, it explains why operational diversity influences corporate philanthropy, by using the premises of resource dependence theory. Second, this study also investigates the influence of board diversity on corporate philanthropy. (...)
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  • Critical Mass of Women on BODs, Multiple Identities, and Corporate Philanthropic Disaster Response: Evidence From Privately Owned Chinese Firms.Ming Jia & Zhe Zhang - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 118 (2):303-317.
    Although previous studies focus on the role of women in the boardroom and corporate response to natural disasters, none evaluate how women directors influence corporate philanthropic disaster response (CPDR). This study collects data on the philanthropic responses of privately owned Chinese firms to the Wenchuan earthquake of May 12, 2008, and the Yushu earthquake of April 14, 2010. We find that when at least three women serve on a board of directors (BOD), their companies’ responses to natural disasters are more (...)
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  • Do Suppliers Applaud Corporate Social Performance?Min Zhang, Lijun Ma, Jun Su & Wen Zhang - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 121 (4):543-557.
    The influence of corporate social performance on stakeholders is one of the focal issues in corporate social responsibility research. Using data of listed companies in China, this paper examines whether CSR behavior in the form of charitable donations garners a positive reaction from suppliers. Results derived from both level and change model regressions show that superior CSP makes it easier for a firm to obtain trade credit from suppliers, although the effect is significant only in non-state-owned enterprises. The results are (...)
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  • Religion, the Nature of Ultimate Owner, and Corporate Philanthropic Giving: Evidence From China.Xingqiang Du, Wei Jian, Yingjie Du, Wentao Feng & Quan Zeng - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 123 (2):1-22.
    Using a sample of Chinese listed firms for the period of 2004–2010, this study examines the impact of religion on corporate philanthropic giving. Based on hand-collected data of religion and corporate philanthropic giving, we provide strong and robust evidence that religion is significantly positively associated with Chinese listed firms’ philanthropic giving. This finding is consistent with the view that religiosity has remarkable effects on individual thinking and behavior, and can serve as social norms to influence corporate philanthropy. Moreover, religion and (...)
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  • Battling the Devolution in the Research on Corporate Philanthropy.Kellie Liket & Ana Simaens - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 126 (2):1-24.
    The conceptual literature increasingly portrays corporate philanthropy (CP) as an old-fashioned and ineffective operationalization of a firm’s corporate social responsibility. In contrast, empirical research indicates that corporations of all sizes, and both in developed and emerging economies, actively practice CP. This disadvantaged status of the concept, and research, on CP, complicates the advancement of our knowledge about the topic. In a systematic review of the literature containing 122 journal articles on CP, we show that this business practice is loaded with (...)
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  • Opening the Black Box of CSR Decision Making: A Policy-Capturing Study of Charitable Donation Decisions in China.Shuo Wang, Yuhui Gao, Gerard P. Hodgkinson, Denise M. Rousseau & Patrick C. Flood - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 128 (3):665-683.
    This policy-capturing study, conducted in China, investigated the cognitive basis of managerial decisions to make a corporate charitable donation, a global issue in the context of corporate social responsibility research and practice. Participants responded to a series of scenarios manipulating pressure from the five stakeholders most commonly addressed by CSR research. The independent variables examined included organizational factors and the participants’ personal values. Results indicate a large positive effect of shareholder and governmental pressure on the decision with lesser positive effects (...)
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  • News Visibility and Corporate Philanthropic Response: Evidence From Privately Owned Chinese Firms Following the Wenchuan Earthquake.Zhe Zhang & Ming Jia - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 129 (1):93-114.
    Considerable interest exists regarding the media’s influence on corporate reactions, but the link between media visibility and corporate philanthropic response is not clear. Natural disasters thus provide an environment that makes visible the general processes relevant to that link. Based on agenda-setting theory, stakeholder theory, and impression-management theory, we propose that corporations that are highly visible in the news media are more likely to engage in CPR and donate more money. We also propose that companies with reputations for irresponsibility or (...)
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  • Is Corporate Philanthropy Used as Environmental Misconduct Dressing? Evidence From Chinese Family-Owned Firms.Xingqiang Du - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 129 (2):341-361.
    In this study, I examine the hidden connection between corporate philanthropic giving and corporate environmental misconduct. Using survey data from Chinese family-owned firms, I provide strong and consistent evidence to show that corporate environmental misconduct is significantly positively associated with corporate philanthropic giving, suggesting that some Chinese family-owned firms act philanthropically to divert public attention from their environmentally unfriendly behavior. Moreover, the positive association between corporate environmental misconduct and corporate philanthropic giving is less pronounced for politically connected family-owned firms than (...)
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  • What Drives Managerial Perks? An Empirical Test of Competing Theoretical Perspectives.Hua Zhang, Yuanyang Song & Yuan Ding - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 132 (2):259-275.
    What drives managerial perks? The commonly accepted view of perks suggests that they are a misuse of firm resources for managers’ private benefit, and thus perk consumption is unethical. However, an alternative view argues that perks can motivate managers to work hard and thus add to the value of the firm : from this perspective, perk consumption is an ethical form of behavior. The fundamental difference between the two positions has critical implications for practice, and this article tests these competing (...)
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  • Government Intervention, Peers’ Giving and Corporate Philanthropy: Evidence From Chinese Private SMEs.Yongqiang Gao & Taïeb Hafsi - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 132 (2):433-447.
    Institutional and resource dependence theories point at the roles of government and peers’ behavior as determinants of firms’ social behavior. This is tested in this research, with important implications for both theory and practice. Using data from a national survey of Chinese private small- and medium-sized enterprises in 2008, this paper examines the role of government intervention in corporate philanthropy, as well as the moderation effect of peers’ giving. Results show that government intervention, when using a Marketization Index as a (...)
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  • Do Lenders Value Corporate Social Responsibility? Evidence From China.Kangtao Ye & Ran Zhang - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 104 (2):197-206.
    Drawing on risk mitigation theory, this article examines whether the improvement of firms’ social performance reduces debt financing costs (CDFs) in China, the world’s largest emerging market. Employing both the ordinary least square (OLS) and the two-stage instrumental variable regression methods, we find that improved corporate social responsibility (CSR) reduces the CDF when firms’ CSR investment is lower than an optimal level; however, this relationship is reversed after the CSR investment exceeds the optimal level. Firms with extremely low or extremely (...)
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  • The Value of Corporate Philanthropy During Times of Crisis: The Sensegiving Effect of Employee Involvement. [REVIEW]Alan Muller & Roman Kräussl - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 103 (2):203-220.
    Recent research suggests that philanthropy’s value to the firm is largely mediated by contextual factors such as managers’ assumed motives for charity. Our article extends this contingency perspective using a “sensegiving” lens, by which external actors’ interpretations of organizational actions may be influenced by the way in which the organization communicates about those actions. We consider how sensegiving features in philanthropy-related press releases affect whether investors value those donation decisions. For the empirical investigation in this study, we analyze abnormal returns (...)
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  • Are Politically Endorsed Firms More Socially Responsible? Selective Engagement in Corporate Social Responsibility.Xiaowei Rose Luo & Danqing Wang - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-21.
    The state plays a major role in corporate social responsibility in emerging and transitional economies and often influences firms through political connection, and hence knowing how firms respond to the state’s CSR initiatives can inform policy making and has important implication on the sustainability of society and environment. However, existent studies show conflicting results on politically connected firms’ CSR participation. We examine the relationship between political endorsement and firms’ engagement in different types of CSR simultaneously. Using a representative sample of (...)
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  • Corporate Charitable Contributions: Business Award Winners' Giving Behaviors.Choong-Yuel Yoo & Jinhan Pae - 2016 - Business Ethics: A European Review 25 (1):25-44.
    We investigate corporate giving behaviors of prestigious business award winners in Korea. In particular, we examine whether firms strategically use corporate giving to enhance corporate reputation. We find that award winners generally make more charitable contributions than nonwinners prior to winning awards and maintain significant charitable contributions after winning awards; multiple award winners make even more charitable contributions than single-award winners; and an increase in charitable contributions does not raise the probability of winning awards in the year after the increase. (...)
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  • Corporate Philanthropy and Tunneling: Evidence From China.Jun Chen, Wang Dong, Jamie Tong & Feida Zhang - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (1):135-157.
    This paper examines the association between corporate philanthropy and tunneling by controlling shareholders. Using a unique dataset from China, the paper finds evidence that firms donating more are less likely to tunnel. The negative association between philanthropy and tunneling is stronger when firms are faced with more severe agency conflicts, as indicated by lower largest shareholding, fewer growth opportunities, lower state ownership, and weaker product market competition. The results suggest that companies engaging in philanthropy have incentives to enhance their reputations (...)
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  • Congruence in Corporate Social Responsibility: Connecting the Identity and Behavior of Employers and Employees.Debbie Haski-Leventhal, Lonneke Roza & Lucas C. P. M. Meijs - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 143 (1):35-51.
    The multi-disciplinary interest in social responsibility on the part of individuals and organizations over the past 30 years has generated several descriptors of corporate social responsibility and employee social responsibility. These descriptors focus largely on socially responsible behavior and, in some cases, on socially responsible identity. Very few authors have combined the two concepts in researching social responsibility. This situation can lead to an oversimplification of the concept of CSR, thereby impeding the examination of congruence between employees and organizations with (...)
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  • Business Groups and Tunneling: Evidence From Corporate Charitable Contributions by Korean Companies.Byungki Kim, Jinhan Pae & Choong-Yuel Yoo - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 154 (3):643-666.
    This paper investigates whether corporate philanthropic decisions are associated with a firm’s listing status and business group affiliation. Analyzing a large sample of public and private firms in Korea, we find that public firms make more charitable contributions than private firms and business group-affiliated firms make more charitable contributions than non-affiliated firms. The results suggest that public firms, owing to greater public scrutiny, and business groups, owing to higher political costs, are encouraged to make more corporate charitable contributions. Further, we (...)
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  • Political Dependence, Social Scrutiny, and Corporate Philanthropy: Evidence From Disaster Relief.Yongqiang Gao & Taïeb Hafsi - 2017 - Business Ethics: A European Review 26 (2):189-203.
    This study explores why and how firms respond to social demands through philanthropic giving in the context of a severe natural disaster. Drawing on Marquis and Qian's organizational response model to government signals, we integrate resource dependence theory and institutional theory to build a two-step model of organizational response to social needs, in situations of disaster relief. We argue that firms depending more on the government for support are more likely to donate in disaster relief, while firms who receive more (...)
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  • Intragroup Transactions, Corporate Governance, and Corporate Philanthropy in Korean Business Groups.Won-Yong Oh, Young Kyun Chang, Gyeonghwan Lee & Jeongil Seo - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 153 (4):1031-1049.
    This study examines how the corporate philanthropy decisions of group-affiliated firms in Korea are made. Based on the attention-based view, we argue that when corporate decision makers at group-affiliated firms focus their attention more on internal markets than external stakeholders because of the firm’s high reliance on intragroup transactions, the firm will decrease its level of corporate philanthropy. We further argue that the relationship will be stronger when governance mechanisms focus on the instrumental value of corporate philanthropy. Using a panel (...)
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  • Market Reactions to the First-Time Disclosure of Corporate Social Responsibility Reports: Evidence From China.Kun Tracy Wang & Dejia Li - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 138 (4):661-682.
    We examine whether investors value the disclosure of first-time standalone corporate social responsibility reports, and whether market valuations differ between government-controlled and privately controlled firms. Using a matched sample of Chinese publicly listed firms, we find that CSR initiators have higher market valuations than matched CSR non-initiators, and CSR initiators controlled by the central and local governments have lower market valuations than CSR non-initiators and CSR initiators controlled by private shareholders. Additional analyses demonstrate that CSR initiators with high CSR reporting (...)
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  • The Role of Corporate Donations in Chinese Political Markets.Ming Jia & Zhe Zhang - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 153 (2):519-545.
    Many corporations actively engage in political activities to enhance their relationships with politicians, facilitating access to scarce resources and creating competitive advantages. We investigate corporate donations to explore how they initiate interactions between firms and new local leaders in China. Specifically, we propose that political turnover creates unique opportunities for firms to win over new officials via corporate donations, especially in competitive markets. Moreover, we find that firms that make generous donations at the beginning of a new city secretary’s tenure (...)
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  • Corporate Social Responsibility and Firm Financial Performance: The Mediating Role of Productivity.Iftekhar Hasan, Nada Kobeissi, Liuling Liu & Haizhi Wang - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 149 (3):671-688.
    This study treats firm productivity as an accumulation of productive intangibles and posits that stakeholder engagement associated with better corporate social performance helps develop such intangibles. We hypothesize that because shareholders factor improved productive efficiency into stock price, productivity mediates the relationship between corporate social and financial performance. Furthermore, we argue that key stakeholders’ social considerations are more valuable for firms with higher levels of discretionary cash and income stream uncertainty. Therefore, we hypothesize that those two contingencies moderate the mediated (...)
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  • Religious Belief, Corporate Philanthropy, and Political Involvement of Entrepreneurs in Chinese Family Firms.Xingqiang Du - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 142 (2):385-406.
    This study examines whether religious belief influences an entrepreneur’s political involvement and further explores the moderating role of corporate philanthropy. Using the data from the 2008 national survey of Chinese family firms, my study provides strong evidence to show that the likelihood of political involvement is significantly higher for entrepreneurs with religious beliefs than for their counterparts, suggesting that religious entrepreneurs in Chinese family firms are more likely to participate in political affairs. This finding echoes the view that religious believers (...)
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  • Corporate Philanthropy and Stock Price Crash Risk: Evidence From China.Min Zhang, Lu Xie & Haoran Xu - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 139 (3):595-617.
    How to mitigate stock price crash risk has become a focus in the theoretical and practical fields. Building on the work of Kim et al., this paper investigates the relation between corporate philanthropy and crash risk under the unique Chinese institutional background. The results show that both state ownership and the 2005 split share reform attenuate the mitigating effect of corporate philanthropy on crash risk. Specifically, the negative relation between corporate philanthropy and crash risk is less pronounced for state-owned enterprises (...)
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  • Media Coverage and Firm Valuation: Evidence From China.Jiwei Wang & Kangtao Ye - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 127 (3):501-511.
    Drawing on both a managerial discipline perspective and an information intermediary perspective, we explore how media coverage of a firm’s controlling shareholder influences firm valuation in corporate China. Using 366 listed family firms in China from 2003 to 2006, we find that firms in which controlling shareholders receive more neutral media reports enjoy higher valuation, whereas negative media reports on controlling shareholders impose adverse effects on firm valuation. Interestingly, favorable media coverage of the controlling shareholders does not enhance firm value. (...)
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