Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Philosophy as an Event.Peter Takáč - 2011 - Human Affairs 21 (2):220-225.
  • Neo-Anarchism or Neo-Liberalism? Yes, Please! A Response to Simon Critchley's Infinitely Demanding.Robert Sinnerbrink - 2009 - Critical Horizons 10 (2):163-179.
    Simon Critchley's Infinitely Demanding makes a timely contribution to contemporary debates in ethics and political philosophy. For all its originality, however, one can raise critical questions concerning Critchley's account of the forms of resistance possible within liberal democratic polities. In this article I question the adequacy of Critchley's ethically based neo-anarchism as a response to neo-liberalism, critically analysing the role of ideology in his account of the motivational deficit afflicting capitalist liberal democracies.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • “Critchley is Žižek” : In Defence of Critical Political Philosophy.Matthew Sharpe - 2009 - Critical Horizons 10 (2):180-196.
    In an ironically Žižekian manner, this paper argues that Simon Critchley and Slavoj Žižek's apparent political disagreement (ludic reformist versus strident revolutionary) conceal a common set of preconditions and presuppositions. These presuppositions can be summed by the slogan “the forgetting of political philosophy”, which more specifically means the forgetting of the difference between philosophy and political life, and the reflective need to find mediations between the two. Critchley's turn to humour honours the notion that politics is about the realm of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Humorous Commitments and Non-Violent Politics: A Response to Simon Critchley's Infinitely Demanding.Fiona Jenkins - 2009 - Critical Horizons 10 (2):257-271.
    This discussion of Infinitely Demanding explores the terms of the paradox with which Critchley is centrally concerned: how an ethico-politics can at once begin in disappointment and yet allow for engagement, the infinite renewal of commitment and optimism. Placing this in critical relation to the paradox Rorty meets with his account of the "private ironist and public liberal" in Contingency, Irony, Solidarity, I argue that Critchley's ethico-politics invokes the possibility of a non-ironical categorical imperative, at the meeting point of finitude (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark