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  1. The Role of Motor Affordances in Visual Working Memory.Diane Pecher - 2014 - The Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication 9.
    Motor affordances are important for object knowledge. Semantic tasks on visual objects often show interactions with motor actions. Prior neuro-imaging studies suggested that motor affordances also play a role in visual working memory for objects. When participants remembered manipulable objects greater premotor cortex activation was observed than when they remembered non-manipulable objects. In the present study participants held object pictures in working memory while performing concurrent tasks such as articulation of nonsense syllables and performing hand movements. Although concurrent tasks did (...)
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  • Embodied Cognition and Linguistic Comprehension.Daniel A. Weiskopf - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 41 (3):294-304.
    Traditionally, the language faculty was supposed to be a device that maps linguistic inputs to semantic or conceptual representations. These representations themselves were supposed to be distinct from the representations manipulated by the hearer’s perceptual and motor systems. Recently this view of language has been challenged by advocates of embodied cognition. Drawing on empirical studies of linguistic comprehension, they have proposed that the language faculty reuses the very representations and processes deployed in perceiving and acting. I review some of the (...)
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  • The Integration of Figurative Language and Static Depictions: An Eye Movement Study of Fictive Motion.Daniel Richardson & Teenie Matlock - 2007 - Cognition 102 (1):129-138.
  • Insights Into Knowledge Representation: The Influence of Amodal and Perceptual Variables on Event Knowledge Retrieval From Memory.Susanne Raisig, Tinka Welke, Herbert Hagendorf & Elke van der Meer - 2009 - Cognitive Science 33 (7):1252-1266.
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  • Actual and Non-Actual Motion: Why Experientialist Semantics Needs Phenomenology (and Vice Versa). [REVIEW]Johan Blomberg & Jordan Zlatev - 2014 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 13 (3):395-418.
    Experientialist semantics has contributed to a broader notion of linguistic meaning by emphasizing notions such as construal, perspective, metaphor, and embodiment, but has suffered from an individualist concept of meaning and has conflated experiential motivations with conventional semantics. We argue that these problems can be redressed by methods and concepts from phenomenology, on the basis of a case study of sentences of non-actual motion such as “The mountain range goes all the way from Mexico to Canada.” Through a phenomenological reanalysis (...)
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  • An Embodied Model for Sensorimotor Grounding and Grounding Transfer: Experiments With Epigenetic Robots.Angelo Cangelosi & Thomas Riga - 2006 - Cognitive Science 30 (4):673-689.
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  • Spatial Representations Elicit Dual‐Coding Effects in Mental Imagery.Michelle Verges & Sean Duffy - 2009 - Cognitive Science 33 (6):1157-1172.
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  • Putting Motor Resonance in Perspective.Sandra C. Lozano, Bridgette Martin Hard & Barbara Tversky - 2008 - Cognition 106 (3):1195-1220.
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  • Imagery, Expression, and Metaphor.Mitchell Green - 2017 - Philosophical Studies 174 (1):33--46.
    Metaphorical utterances are construed as falling into two broad categories, in one of which are cases amenable to analysis in terms of semantic content, speaker meaning, and satisfaction conditions, and where image-construction is permissible but not mandatory. I call these image-permitting metaphors, and contrast them with image-demanding metaphors comprising a second category and whose understanding mandates the construction of a mental image. This construction, I suggest, is spontaneous, is not restricted to visual imagery, and its result is typically somatically marked (...)
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  • Perception of Motion Affects Language Processing.Michael P. Kaschak, Carol J. Madden, David J. Therriault, Richard H. Yaxley, Mark Aveyard, Adrienne A. Blanchard & Rolf A. Zwaan - 2005 - Cognition 94 (3):B79 - B89.
  • Eye Movements Reveal the Dynamic Simulation of Speed in Language.Laura J. Speed & Gabriella Vigliocco - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (2):367-382.
    This study investigates how speed of motion is processed in language. In three eye-tracking experiments, participants were presented with visual scenes and spoken sentences describing fast or slow events (e.g., The lion ambled/dashed to the balloon). Results showed that looking time to relevant objects in the visual scene was affected by the speed of verb of the sentence, speaking rate, and configuration of a supporting visual scene. The results provide novel evidence for the mental simulation of speed in language and (...)
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  • An Enactivist Account of Abstract Words: Lessons From Merleau-Ponty.Brian Irwin - 2017 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 16 (1):133-153.
    Enactivist accounts of language use generally treat concrete words in terms of motor intentionality systems and affordances for action. There is less consensus, though, regarding how abstract words are to be understood in enactivist terms. I draw on Merleau-Ponty’s later philosophy to argue, against the representationalist paradigm that has dominated the cognitive scientific and philosophical traditions, that language is fundamentally a mode of participation in our world. In particular, language orients us within our milieus in a manner that extends into (...)
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  • Real and Imagined Body Movement Primes Metaphor Comprehension.Nicole L. Wilson & Raymond W. Gibbs - 2007 - Cognitive Science 31 (4):721-731.
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  • The Action–Sentence Compatibility Effect: It's All in the Timing.Kristin L. Borreggine & Michael P. Kaschak - 2006 - Cognitive Science 30 (6):1097-1112.
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  • Uncharted Features and Dynamics of Reading: Voices, Characters, and Crossing of Experiences.Ben Alderson-Day, Marco Bernini & Charles Fernyhough - 2017 - Consciousness and Cognition 49:98-109.
  • Action Contribution to Competence Judgments: The Use of the Journey Schema.Oleksandr V. Horchak, Jean-Christophe Giger & Margarida V. Garrido - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  • Simulating Visibility During Language Comprehension.Richard H. Yaxley & Rolf A. Zwaan - 2007 - Cognition 105 (1):229-236.
  • The Case of the Missing Pronouns: Does Mentally Simulated Perspective Play a Functional Role in the Comprehension of Person?Manami Sato & Benjamin K. Bergen - 2013 - Cognition 127 (3):361-374.
  • How Language Programs the Mind.Gary Lupyan & Benjamin Bergen - 2016 - Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (1).
    Many animals can be trained to perform novel tasks. People, too, can be trained, but sometime in early childhood people transition from being trainable to something qualitatively more powerful—being programmable. We argue that such programmability constitutes a leap in the way that organisms learn, interact, and transmit knowledge, and that what facilitates or enables this programmability is the learning and use of language. We then examine how language programs the mind and argue that it does so through the manipulation of (...)
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  • Cognitive Penetration and the Cognition–Perception Interface.Daniel Burnston - 2017 - Synthese 194 (9):3645-3668.
    I argue that discussions of cognitive penetration have been insufficiently clear about what distinguishes perception and cognition, and what kind of relationship between the two is supposed to be at stake in the debate. A strong reading, which is compatible with many characterizations of penetration, posits a highly specific and directed influence on perception. According to this view, which I call the “internal effect view” a cognitive state penetrates a perceptual process if the presence of the cognitive state causes a (...)
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  • The Sound of Motion in Spoken Language: Visual Information Conveyed by Acoustic Properties of Speech.Hadas Shintel & Howard C. Nusbaum - 2007 - Cognition 105 (3):681-690.
  • Processing of Color Words Activates Color Representations.Tobias Richter & Rolf A. Zwaan - 2009 - Cognition 111 (3):383-389.
  • Representing Object Colour in Language Comprehension.Louise Connell - 2007 - Cognition 102 (3):476-485.
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  • Perception of Auditory Motion Affects Language Processing.Michael P. Kaschak, Rolf A. Zwaan, Mark Aveyard & Richard H. Yaxley - 2006 - Cognitive Science 30 (4):733-744.