From PhilPapers forum PhilPapers Surveys:

2010-11-08
Factor analysis
I don't understand factor analysis well, but it seems as if answers to most questions are predicted by just one factor.

For instance, if you are an anti-naturalist, then it's likely that you are going to be a non-physicalist about mind, think that there is a further fact about personal identity, be a libertarian in free will, and believe in God. None of these answers is significantly predicted by any other factor. (Though I wonder what's fundamental: maybe if you believe in God, the others follow as far as your own reasoning is concerned.)

There are a few questions that are determined by more than one factor. Knowledge rationalism is predicted by:   anti-naturalism, realism, and rationalism itself.

But all in all, there seem to be just four basic determinative "personality" factors in philosophy: naturalism, realism, rationalism, and externalism. Aside from externalism, which speaks to the transformative influence of Kripke and Putnam, the other three are old chestnuts. I suppose naturalism is the newest of the other three, dating to the Scientific Revolution, or perhaps to nineteenth century materialism.

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