Henry Laycock Queen's University, Clare Hall Cambridge
About me
I am a graduate of University College, Oxford, a Visiting Professor at the University of Padua, and a Life Member of Clare Hall, Cambridge (not 'staff'). A more or less completely new version of the S.E.P. entry for 'OBJECT' appeared in the Fall 2010 Edition of the S.E.P. I am currently working on a project provisionally entitled 'The Metachemistry of Stuff' - a work on metaphysical and logico-semantic issues relating to the formal representation of sentences containing concrete non-count nouns (or 'mass nouns').
My works
41 found

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  1. Notes to Object.H. Laycock - forthcoming - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
     
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  2.  1
    Time, Language, and Ontology: The World From the B-Theoretic Perspective. [REVIEW]Henry Laycock - 2016 - Review of Metaphysics 69 (3):630-632.
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  3. Every Sum or Parts Which Are Water is Water.Henry Laycock - 2011 - Humana.Mente 19 (1):41-55.
    Mereological entities often seem to violate ‘ordinary’ ideas of what a concrete object can be like, behaving more like sets than like Aristotelian substances. However, the mereological notions of ‘part’, ‘composition’, and ‘sum’ or ‘fusion’ appear to find concrete realisation in the actual semantics of mass nouns. Quine notes that ‘any sum of parts which are water is water’; and the wine from a single barrel can be distributed around the globe without affecting its identity. Is there here, as some (...)
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  4.  88
    Object.Henry Laycock - 2010 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    In The Principles of Mathematics, Russell writes: Whatever may be an object of thought, or may occur in any true or false proposition, or can be counted as one, I call a term. This, then, is the widest word in the philosophical vocabulary. I shall use as synonymous with it the words unit, individual and entity. The first two emphasize the fact that every term is one, while the third is derived from the fact that every term has being, i.e. (...)
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  5. Language.Henry Laycock - 2007 - “The Language of Science” (ISSN Code.
    I offer a synoptic account of some chief parameters of language and its relationship to communication and to thought, distinguishing in the process between semantical and pragmatic dimensions of utterance.
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  6. Mass Nouns, Count Nouns, and Non-Count Nouns: Philosophical Aspects.Henry Laycock - 2006 - In Keith Brown (ed.), Encyclopedia of Language and Linguistics. Elsevier. pp. 534--538.
  7. 1. Ontology and Concept-Script.Henry Laycock - 2006 - In Paolo Valore (ed.), Topics on General and Formal Ontology. Polimetrica International Scientific Publisher. pp. 27.
     
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  8.  98
    Variables, Generality and Existence.Henry Laycock - 2006 - In Paulo Valore (ed.), Topics on General and Formal Ontology. Polimetrica. pp. 27.
    So-called mass nouns, however precisely they are defined, are in any case a subset of non-count nouns. Count nouns are either singular or plural; to be non-count is hence to be neither singular nor plural. This is not, as such, a metaphysically significant contrast: 'pieces of furniture' is plural whereas 'furniture' itself is non-count. This contrast is simply between 'the many / few' and 'the much / little' - between counting and measuring. However not all non-count nouns are, like 'furniture', (...)
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  9. Words Without Objects.Henry Laycock - 2006 - Clarendon Press Oxford.
    A picture of the world as chiefly one of discrete objects, distributed in space and time, has sometimes seemed compelling. It is however one of two main targets of this work; for it is seriously incomplete. The picture leaves no space for stuff like air and water. With discrete objects, we may always ask "how many?," but with stuff the question has to be "how much?" Within philosophy, stuff of certain basic kinds is central to the ancient pre-Socratic world-view; but (...)
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  10. Words Without Objects: Semantics, Ontology, and Logic for Non-Singularity.Henry Laycock - 2006 - Oxford University Press.
    A picture of the world as chiefly one of discrete objects, distributed in space and time, has sometimes seemed compelling. It is however one of the main targets of Henry Laycock's book; for it is seriously incomplete. The picture, he argues, leaves no space for "stuff" like air and water. With discrete objects, we may always ask "how many?," but with stuff the question has to be "how much?" Laycock's fascinating exploration also addresses key logical and linguistic questions about the (...)
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  11.  2
    Words Without Objects: Semantics Ontology and Logic for Non-Singularity.Henry Laycock - 2006 - Oxford University Press UK.
    A picture of the world as chiefly one of discrete objects, distributed in space and time, has sometimes seemed compelling. It is however one of two main targets of Henry Laycock's book; for it is seriously incomplete. The picture, he argues, leaves no space for stuff like air and water. With discrete objects, we may always ask 'how many?', but with stuff the question has to be 'how much?' Within philosophy, stuff of certain basic kinds is central to the ancient (...)
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  12. Mass Nouns, Count Nouns and Non-Count Nouns.Henry Laycock - 2005 - In Alex Barber (ed.), Encyclopedia of Language and Linguistics. Elsevier.
    I present a high-level account of the semantical distinction between count nouns and non-count nouns. The basic idea is that count nouns are semantically either singular or plural and non-count nouns are neither.
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  13.  88
    Exploitation Via Labour Power in Marx.Henry Laycock - 1999 - Journal of Ethics 3 (2):121--131.
    Marx''s account of capitalist exploitation is undermined by inter-related confusions surrounding the notion of labour power. These confusions relate to [i] what labour power is, [ii] what happens to labour power in the labour market, and [iii] what the epistemic status of labour power is (the issue of appearance and reality). The central theses of the paper are [a] that property ownership is the wrong model for understanding the exploitation of labour, and [b] that the concept of exploitation is linked (...)
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  14. Words Without Objects.Henry Laycock - 1998 - Principia: Revista Internacional de Epistemologia 2 (2):147-182.
    Resolution of the problem of mass nouns depends on an expansion of our semantic/ontological taxonomy. Semantically, mass nouns are neither singular nor plural; they apply to neither just one object, nor to many objects, at a time. But their deepest kinship links them to the plural. A plural phrase — 'the cats in Kingston' — does not denote a single plural thing, but merely many distinct things. Just so, 'the water in the lake' does not denote a single aggregate — (...)
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  15. Istvan Meszaros, The Power of Ideology Reviewed By.Henry Laycock - 1991 - Philosophy in Review 11 (3):214-216.
     
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  16. Istvan Meszaros, The Power of Ideology. [REVIEW]Henry Laycock - 1991 - Philosophy in Review 11:214-216.
     
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  17. Barry Barnes, The Nature of Power Reviewed By.Henry Laycock - 1989 - Philosophy in Review 9 (10):394-396.
     
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  18. Barry Barnes, The Nature of Power. [REVIEW]Henry Laycock - 1989 - Philosophy in Review 9:394-396.
     
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  19.  13
    Exploitation and Equality: Labour Power as a Non-Commodity.Henry Laycock - 1989 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 19 (sup1):375-389.
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  20. Exploitation and Equality: Labour Power as a Non-Commodity.Henry Laycock - 1989 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy, Supplementary Volume 15:375.
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  21.  34
    Matter and Objecthood Disentangled.Henry Laycock - 1989 - Dialogue 28 (01):17-.
    The concept of matter is not, I urge, reducible to the concept of an object. This is to be distingusihed from the counterintuitive Aristotelian claim that matter depends for its existence on objects which it constitutes.
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  22.  8
    Critical Notice.Henry Laycock - 1985 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 15 (3):553-563.
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  23.  23
    The Structure of Marx's World-View.Henry Laycock - 1985 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 15 (3):553-563.
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  24. Alan Garfinkel, Forms of Explanation Reviewed By.Henry Laycock - 1982 - Philosophy in Review 2 (2/3):93-96.
     
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  25. Alan Garfinkel, Forms of Explanation. [REVIEW]Henry Laycock - 1982 - Philosophy in Review 2:93-96.
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  26.  7
    Critical Notice.Henry Laycock - 1980 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 10 (2):335-356.
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  27.  33
    Critical Notice of G. A. Cohen, Karl Marx's Theory of History, A Defense; and William H. Shaw, Marx's Theory of History.Henry Laycock - 1980 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 10 (2):335-356.
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  28. Karl Marx's Theory of History, a Defense by G. A. Cohen; Marx's Theory of History by William H. Shaw.Henry Laycock - 1980 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 10 (2):335-356.
    "Capital is moved as much and as little by the degradation and final depopulation of the human race, as by the probable fall of the earth into the sun. Apres moi le deluge! is the watchword of every capitalist and of every capitalist nation" (Marx, CAPITAL Vol 1, 380-381).
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  29.  6
    Critical Notice.Henry Laycock - 1975 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 5 (1):173-180.
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  30.  18
    Critical Notice of Rom Harré and Paul. E. Secord, The Explanation of Social Behaviour.Henry Laycock - 1975 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 5 (1):173-180.
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  31. Theories of Matter.Henry Laycock - 1975 - Synthese 31 (3-4):411 - 442.
    "Matter" may be defined, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, as "The substance, or the substances collectively, out of which a physical object is made or of which it consists". And while the O.E.D. is not the ultimate authority on words, nor is it, I believe, far wrong in this particular case. The definition is, as I shall argue in this paper, in substantial harmony with a tradition of some antiquity, according to which material objects do not constitute a somehow (...)
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  32.  25
    The Nature of Things. By Anthony Quinton. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, Toronto: General Publishing Co. 1973. Pp. Ix, 394. $14.40. [REVIEW]Henry Laycock - 1973 - Dialogue 12 (3):537-539.
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  33. Some Questions of Ontology.Henry Laycock - 1972 - Philosophical Review 81 (1):3-42.
    The views of Quine and Strawson on the significance of 'mass terms' are rehearsed, and the metaphysical status of substances, in the chemist's sense, is considered. It is urged that the ontological dichotomy of particulars and universals is not adequate to accommodate such substances, which are in a sense to be explicated concrete but non-particular.
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  34. "A. N. Whitehead", La Fonction de la Raison Et Autres Essais. [REVIEW]Henry Laycock - 1970 - Dialogue 9 (2):248.
     
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  35.  15
    Jean Hyppolite, Studies on Marx and Hegel. [REVIEW]Henry Laycock - 1970 - Dialogue 9 (2):248-250.
  36.  10
    Studies on Marx and Hegel. By Jean Hyppolite. Edited and Translated by John O'Neill. New York: Basic Books, Inc., Don Mills: General Publishing Co. Limited, 1969, Pp. Xx, 202, $8.00. [REVIEW]Henry Laycock - 1970 - Dialogue 9 (2):248-250.
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  37.  11
    Persons. By Roland Puccetti. London & Toronto: Macmillan Co. Of Canada Ltd., 1968. Pp. 145. $7.95.Henry Laycock - 1969 - Dialogue 8 (2):344-346.
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  38.  25
    Wittgenstein and the Problem of Other Minds. Ed. By Harold Morick, New York and Toronto: McGraw-Hill, 1967. Pp. Xxii, 231. [REVIEW]Henry Laycock - 1969 - Dialogue 8 (2):337-338.
  39.  23
    Ordinary Language and Materialism.H. Laycock - 1967 - Philosophy 42 (162):363 - 367.
    The concept of 'the body', in the supposed contrast of mind and body, is not to be distinguished from the concept of the person, hence dualism is an incorrect conception of the supposed contrast, which is consistent with some form of materialism.
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  40.  19
    A Study of Frege. By Jeremy D. B. Walker. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1965. Pp. Xiv, 202. $7.50.H. Laycock - 1966 - Dialogue 4 (4):551.
  41. Words Without Objects - Book and Chapters Abstracts.Henry Laycock - manuscript
    The 'paper' is itself an abstract, hopefully useful, of the book and its chapters from Clarendon Press (April 2006).
     
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