Year:

  1.  3
    Are Animals Moral?: Zhu Xi and Jeong Yakyong’s Views on Nonhuman Animals.Youngsun Back - 2018 - Asian Philosophy 28 (2):97-116.
    ABSTRACTOne significant feature of Jeong Yakyong’s丁若鏞 thought is his deconstruction of Zhu Xi’s 朱熹 moral universe based on li 理 and qi 氣. For Zhu Xi, the world in its entirety was a moral place, but Jeong Yakyong distinguished nonmoral domains from the moral domain. One question that follows in pursuing a comparison of their philosophies on this topic is what each thinker meant by ‘moral’ and, in particular, whether they meant the same thing. In this paper, I delve deeper (...)
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  2.  3
    The Spread and Impact of Cartesian Philosophy in China: Historical and Comparative Perspectives.John Zijiang Ding - 2018 - Asian Philosophy 28 (2):117-134.
    ABSTRACTCartesian philosophy has had a profound influence on modern Chinese intellectuals since the mid 19th century. After the May Fourth Movement, there have been many Chinese scholars who worked immensely on Cartesian philosophy and conducted fruitful research including translations, biographies, monographs, and a large number of papers. The examination of mind/body has been one of the most important philosophic issues and also a fundamental truth-searching of the various great thinkers, from Confucius and Socrates to many later Eastern and Western philosophers. (...)
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  3.  4
    The Transformation of the Wang Yangming Scholarship in the West, Ca. 1960–1980: A Historical Essay.George L. Israel - 2018 - Asian Philosophy 28 (2):135-156.
    ABSTRACTStudents of Ming philosophy and the thought of Wang Yangming likely know that the 1960s–1970s was a period during which many scholarships in this field of study were produced in the English language. Indeed, it has been almost half a century since a group of scholars came together at the University of Hawaii to present papers on Wang Yangming in commemoration of the fifth centenary of his birth. That group included, for example, Wing-tsit Chan, David Nivison, and Du Weiming. These (...)
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  4.  5
    Does Han Fei Have a Conception of Justice?Gordon B. Mower - 2018 - Asian Philosophy 28 (2):170-182.
    ABSTRACTHan Fei’s political theory is widely characterized as eschewing any connection with morality; so, can he have any conception of justice? In this paper, I accept the interpretation of Han Fei jettisoning any moral commitment, but I argue that he gives heed to an understanding of justice. This conception of justice arises naturally from the ordinary human sentiment of resentment for wrongs done and becomes a moral staple in the consciousness of ordinary people. Such a conception of justice has these (...)
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  5.  1
    Theoretical Characteristics of the Huainanzi: Theories of Human Nature and Governance.Jung Woojin & Moon Suk-Yoon - 2018 - Asian Philosophy 28 (2):183-195.
    ABSTRACTBy showing its organic linkage between theories of human nature and governance, this article illustrates that the Huainanzi is a scripture that holds a systematic and unique theory. The ideal governance of the Huainanzi is mystical transformation, i.e. the Daoist concept of non-action. Rule by simple Confucian rituals is not at odds with mystical transformation. However, mystical transformation does not include the rule by rituals. Moreover, excessively complicated rituals are incompatible with mystical transformation. Human nature in the Huainanzi does not (...)
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  6.  4
    Thinking with, Against, and Beyond the Pratyabhijñā Philosophy—and Back Again.Sari L. Berger, J. M. Fritzman & Brandon J. Vance - 2018 - Asian Philosophy 28 (1):1-19.
    We argue that the pratyabhijñā system of Kaśmir Śaivism holds an inconsistent position. On the one hand, the Pratyabhijñā regards Śiva as an impersonal mechanism and the universe, including persons, as not having agency; call this the Impersonal Component. On the other hand, it considers Śiva himself as a person, and individual persons as having agency sufficient to respond to Śiva; call this the Personal Component. We maintain that the Personal Component should be affirmed and the Impersonal Component rejected. The (...)
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  7.  3
    I Have an Appointment with the Spring: The Contractual Dimension of Confucianism.Xunwu Chen - 2018 - Asian Philosophy 28 (1):20-34.
    This essay explores the contractual dimension in Confucianism. It demonstrates that essential to Confucianism is the concept of three contracts: the contract of mind with oneself, the cultural contract with society and community; and the moral contract with humanity and the universe at large. Confucianism may not be labelled as contractualism. Nonetheless one would not have an adequate understanding of Confucianism without a view of the contractual dimension of Confucianism. Confucianism may not be labelled as realism. However, essential to Confucianism (...)
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  8.  8
    Fred Dallmayr’s Postmodern Vision of Confucian Democracy: A Critical Examination.Sungmoon Kim - 2018 - Asian Philosophy 28 (1):35-54.
    As an advocate of ‘comparative political theory,’ Fred Dallmayr has long engaged with Confucianism with a new vision for democracy suitable in East Asia but little attention has been paid to his idea of Confucian democracy, which he presents as a specific mode of ethical or relational democracy. This paper investigates Dallmayr’s ethical vision of Confucian democracy, first, by articulating his postmodern reconceptualization of democracy in terms of post-humanism and, second, by examining his post-humanist reevaluation of Confucian virtue ethics as (...)
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  9.  6
    The Zhuangist Views on Emotions.Songyao Ren - 2018 - Asian Philosophy 28 (1):55-67.
    In this article, I will look into the Zhuangist views on emotions. I will argue that the psychological state of the Zhuangist wise person is characterized by emotional equanimity accompanied by a general sense of calmness, ease, and joy. This psychological state is constitutive of and instrumental to leading a good life, one in which one wanders the world and explores the plurality of daos. To do so, I will first provide an overview of the scholarly debate on this issue (...)
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  10.  15
    The Birth of Enlightenment Secularism From the Spirit of Confucianism.Dawid Rogacz - 2018 - Asian Philosophy 28 (1):68-83.
    The aim of the essay is to demonstrate that the contact of European philosophy with Chinese thought in the second half of the 17th and 18th century influenced the rise and development of secularism, which became a distinctive feature of the Western Enlightenment. The first part examines how knowing the history of China and Confucian ethics has questioned biblical chronology and undermined faith as a necessary condition of morality. These allegations were afterwards countered by reinterpreting Confucianism as crypto-monotheism. I will (...)
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  11.  3
    The Butterfly Dream as ‘Creative Dream:’ Dreaming and Subjectivity in Zhuangzi and María Zambrano.Gabriella Stanchina - 2018 - Asian Philosophy 28 (1):84-95.
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  12.  6
    Yu in the Xunzi: Toward a Precise Understanding.Colin J. Lewis - 2018 - Asian Philosophy (2):157-169.
    An ongoing dialogue in Xunzi scholarship addresses the role of yu (欲), often rendered as ‘desire,’ in motivation, but little has been said about what yu actually is, or whether the translation of ‘desire’ accurately reflects Xunzi’s use of the term. Employing textual analysis alongside research in cognitive science, most notably work on the so-called ‘wanting-liking’ distinction, I work toward a more precise understanding of Xunzi’s notion of yu and its functions. I suggest that yu be construed as a kind (...)
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