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  1.  11
    Expertise, Relevance and Types of Knowledge.Pierluigi Barrotta & Eleonora Montuschi - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (6):387-396.
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  2.  9
    Are Experts Right or Are They Members of Expert Groups?Harry Collins - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (6):351-357.
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  3.  5
    The Rightful Place of Expertise.Reiner Grundmann - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (6):372-386.
    ABSTRACTExpertise has come under attack not least since the Brexit vote in the UK and Donald Trump’s election as President of the United States. In this contribution, I will provide some conceptual clarification and suggest a new topology of expertise. I will also examine the historical roots of this challenge to expertise and its social context using a comparative lens. I will ask what it could mean to speak of the rightful place of expertise. I will try to provide an (...)
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  4.  4
    Asymmetry, Disagreement and Biases: Epistemic Worries About Expertise.Cathrine Holst & Anders Molander - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (6):358-371.
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  5.  35
    Towards a Balanced Account of Expertise.Christian Quast - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (6):397-418.
    The interdisciplinary debate about the nature of expertise often conflates having expertise with either the individual possession of competences or a certain role ascription. In contrast to this, the paper attempts to demonstrate how different dimensions of expertise ascription are inextricably interwoven. As a result, a balanced account of expertise will be proposed that more accurately determines the closer relationship between the expert’s dispositions, their manifestations and the expert’s function. This finally results in an advanced understanding of expertise that views (...)
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  6.  7
    Cajal: Key Psychological Factors in the Self-Construction of a Genius.Nuria Anaya-Reig - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (5):311-324.
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  7.  13
    Moral Responsibility, Culpable Ignorance and Suppressed Disagreement.Katherine Furman - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (5):287-299.
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  8.  5
    Post-Normal Science. The Escape of Science: From Truth to Quality?Agnieszka Karpińska - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (5):338-350.
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  9.  20
    What Ignorance Really Is. Examining the Foundations of Epistemology of Ignorance.Nadja El Kassar - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (5):300-310.
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  10.  9
    Under What Conditions May Western Science and Indigenous Knowledge Be Jointly Used and What Does This Really Entail? Insights From a Western Perspectivist Stance.Fulvio Mazzocchi - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (5):325-337.
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  11.  3
    Epistemological Luddism: Reinvigorating a Concept for Action in 21st Century Sociotechnical Struggles.Michael Lachney & Taylor Dotson - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (4):228-240.
    ABSTRACTExplicitly dismantling or decommissioning existing sociotechnical systems seems to be unimaginable both within dominant public imaginaries and in academic thought. Indeed, ‘gee whiz’ journalistic narratives regarding emerging technoscience abound as many members of the public appear to eagerly await any new innovation coming out of Silicon Valley. At the same time, most science and technology studies research focuses on the creation of new technoscience, not its destruction or temporary decommissioning. Yet, lay citizens clearly engage in forms of Luddism: schoolchildren and (...)
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  12.  3
    Egalitarian Paradise or Factory Drudgery? Organizing Knowledge Production in High Energy Physics Laboratories.Slobodan Perović - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (4):241-261.
    The organization of cutting-edge HEP laboratories has evolved in the intersection of academia, state agencies, and industry. Exponentially ever-larger and more complex knowledge-intensive operations, the laboratories have often faced the challenges of, and required organizational solutions similar to, those identified by a cluster of diverse theories falling under the larger heading of organization theory. The cluster has either shaped or accounted for the organization of industry and state administration. The theories also apply to HEP laboratories, as they have gradually and (...)
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  13.  10
    Solving the Problem of Nearly Convergent Knowledge.Chris Tweedt - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (4):219-227.
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  14.  21
    Social Domination and Epistemic Marginalisation: Towards Methodology of the Oppressed.Venkatesh Vaditya - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (4):272-285.
    Marginalisation is both a structural and an epistemic issue. The struggle against exclusion and marginalisation should take place within larger social structures. Moreover, we should address the legitimacy offered, through the knowledge production process itself, for exclusion and marginalisation. Knowledge production regarding the oppressed should document their lives, experiences and concerns. It must take place with an appropriate methodological struggle informed by alternative epistemologies. While creating alternative epistemologies, it is important to challenge the value-neutrality claim of mainstream research practices. We (...)
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  15.  9
    ‘I Just Love Research’: Beliefs About What Makes Researchers Successful.Caitlin Donahue Wylie - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (4):262-271.
    There is a longstanding belief that research should be a calling more than a job. How does this expectation shape the selection of future researchers? Specifically, undergraduate research experience is credited with increasing students’ success in science and engineering majors and their likelihood to choose careers in science and engineering; thus, how researchers select student laboratory workers has implications for the future population of researchers. After all, because research communities construct knowledge collectively, researchers’ identities and experiences crucially shape knowledge. This (...)
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  16.  11
    Order and Conflict Theories of Science as Competing Ideologies.Federico Brandmayr - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (3):175-195.
    Science is sometimes depicted, both in scholarly and lay accounts, as a consensual and orderly progression in the direction of truth; at other times, it is portrayed as an arena in which lone geniuses struggle against rivals and authorities to impose unconventional interpretations of reality. The paper introduces the concept of ‘order-conflict dichotomy’ to stabilize the content of these definitions. It then shows, through an in-depth analysis of the Irving trial, an English libel suit involving historical knowledge about World War (...)
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  17.  6
    Pragmatic Competence Injustice.Manuel Padilla Cruz - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (3):143-163.
    When engaging in verbal communication, we do not simply use language to dispense information, but also to perform a plethora of actions, some of which depend on conventionalised, recurrent linguistic structures. Additionally, we must be skilled enough to arrive at the speaker’s intended meaning. However, speakers’ performance may deviate from certain habits and expectations concerning the way of speaking or accomplishing actions, while various factors may hinder comprehension, which may give rise to misappraisals of their respective abilities and capacities as (...)
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  18. Expertise and Conspiracy Theories.M. R. X. Dentith - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (3):196-208.
    Judging the warrant of conspiracy theories can be difficult, and often we rely upon what the experts tell us when it comes to assessing whether particular conspiracy theories ought to be believed. However, whereas there are recognised experts in the sciences, I argue that only are is no such associated expertise when it comes to the things we call `conspiracy theories,' but that the conspiracy theorist has good reason to be suspicious of the role of expert endorsements when it comes (...)
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  19.  5
    Autopsy of a Historical Fact.Salvatore Italia - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (3):209-217.
    This article considers historical facts and investigates the particular relationship between a factual and a valuative dimension within them. The operation is an autopsy of a particular historical fact, which works as an example. On this basis, the article will elucidate the similarities and the differences between historical facts and natural facts, with an emphasis on the observation that the former are more subject to the influence of interpretation than the latter. This feature of historical facts explains why social and (...)
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  20.  6
    Challenges to Groups as Epistemic Communities: Liminality of Common Sense and Increasing Variability of Word Meanings.Miika Vähämaa - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (3):164-174.
    The ‘epistemic calculus of groups’ posits functions to group-generated knowledge. In this article, those same epistemic group functions are now re-evaluated as means by which group members may tackle two contemporary and increasing challenges, or even obstructions, to knowledge. These obstructions, namely the liminality, the increasingly transitional nature of both ‘common sense’ and ‘common word meanings,’ occur, as our mass and social media practices change. Can groups still remain as ‘epistemic communities’ and regenerate common sense or common word meanings? As (...)
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  21.  18
    Studying Kanonbildung: An Exercise in a Distant Reading of Contemporary Self-Descriptions of the 19th Century German Philosophy.Maxim Demin & Alexei Kouprianov - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (2):112-127.
    In 19th century Germany, the number of publications in the history of philosophy increased dramatically. According to Ulrich Schneider’s calculations, from 1810 through 1899, 148 original textbooks by 114 authors were published in German. The aim of this article is to analyse how the documented in these publications canonic vision of 19th century German philosophy evolved. An analysis of 66 treatises published from 1802 through 1918 allows dividing 19th century philosophers into groups based on the frequency of their names across (...)
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  22.  10
    Homer in the Laboratory: A Feyerabendian Experiment in Sociology of Science.Mark Erickson - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (2):128-141.
    For philosopher of science Paul Feyerabend, an outcome of the Plato-led victory of philosophers over poets is the ‘conquest of abundance’ where abstraction replaces the ‘richness of being’. This poignant motif is visible in the project of the social sciences, where theory describes classificatory schemas that can be imposed upon the social world to categorise and, subsequently, explain it. However, Homer’s writings provide a completely different frame of reference. By reimagining ourselves within this work we may be able to rethink (...)
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  23.  54
    Epistemic Trust and the Ethics of Science Communication: Against Transparency, Openness, Sincerity and Honesty.Stephen John - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (2):75-87.
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  24.  8
    Libertarianism, Information, and Unions.Lars Lindblom - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (2):103-111.
    This article presents a normative epistemological argument for unions, developed from libertarian premises. According to Friedman, the state should set up rules for the market, whereas managers should focus on profits. On this view, business ethics can be handled by regulations, but Hayek’s theory of the market indicates that this position is problematic, since it relies on the state being able to collect the relevant ethical information. Hayek argued that a market system is more efficient than planned economies, since it (...)
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  25.  29
    Systematic Epistemic Rights Violations in the Media: A Brexit Case Study.Lani Watson - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (2):88-102.
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  26.  19
    Scientific Eponyms in Latin America: The Case of Jerzy Plebanski in the Area of Mathematical Physics.Francisco Collazo-Reyes, Hugo García-Compeán, Miguel Ángel Pérez-Angón & Jane Margaret Russell - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (1):63-74.
    The emergence of the term ‘Plebanski’ as a topic trend in the scientific literature is studied as a significant communication event resulting from its use by authors to refer to the relevant aspects of Jerzy Plebanski scientific work in the area of mathematical physics. We searched the ‘Plebanski’ topic included in the titles, abstracts and key words of the papers registered in five databases: ADS/NASA, MathSciNet, SCOPUS, SPIRES and Web of Science. Our results clearly show the evolution of the JP’s (...)
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  27.  31
    Conspiracy Theories and the Paranoid Style: Do Conspiracy Theories Posit Implausibly Vast and Evil Conspiracies?Kurtis Hagen - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (1):24-40.
    In the social science literature, conspiracy theories are commonly characterized as theories positing a vast network of evil and preternaturally effective conspirators, and they are often treated, either explicitly or implicitly, as dubious on this basis. This characterization is based on Richard Hofstadter’s famous account of ‘the paranoid style’. However, many significant conspiracy theories do not have any of the relevant qualities. Thus, the social science literature provides a distorted account of the general category ‘conspiracy theory’, conflating it with a (...)
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  28. A Virtue Epistemology of the Internet: Search Engines, Intellectual Virtues and Education.Richard Heersmink - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (1):1-12.
    This paper applies a virtue epistemology approach to using the Internet, as to improve our information-seeking behaviours. Virtue epistemology focusses on the cognitive character of agents and is less concerned with the nature of truth and epistemic justification as compared to traditional analytic epistemology. Due to this focus on cognitive character and agency, it is a fruitful but underexplored approach to using the Internet in an epistemically desirable way. Thus, the central question in this paper is: How to use the (...)
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  29.  4
    Matters of Dwelling: Releasing the Genetically Engineered Aedes Aegypti Mosquito in Key West.Carl G. Herndl & Tanya Zarlengo - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (1):41-62.
    In 2011, the Florida Keys Mosquito Control District’s proposed to release a genetically engineered Aedes aegypti mosquito to fight the spread of dengue fever and chikungunya. This would be the first release of a genetically engineered insect into the open environment in the US, and the proposal has sparked heated opposition in Key West. We address this controversy through Beck’s concept of reflexive modernity, tracing the way the FKMCD and Oxitec interpret the risk involved in the situation and how citizens (...)
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  30.  20
    Invisibilization and Silencing as an Ethical and Sociological Challenge.Benno Herzog - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (1):13-23.
    Excluded and/or marginalized social groups frequently face problems involving representation in the public sphere. Moreover, the very notion of exclusion typically refers to communicatively or discursively produced mechanisms of being considered irrelevant in public processes of communication. Exclusion and marginalization, understood as processes of silencing or invisibilizing social groups, are particularly serious in cases involving social suffering, i.e. socially produced suffering and/or suffering that can be eliminated or alleviated socially. Making silence heard, giving voice to the silenced and bringing the (...)
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