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  1. Can Liberalism Last? Demographic Demise and the Future of Liberalism.Jonathan Anomaly & Filipe Nobre Faria - 2023 - Social Philosophy and Policy 40 (2):524-543.
    Liberal political institutions have been an enormous boon for humanity. The free market aspect of liberalism has led to an explosion of innovation, ranging from new kinds of technology and novel forms of entertainment to advances in science and medicine. The emphasis on individual rights at the core of liberalism has increased our ability to explore new ways of living and to construct an identity of our own choosing. But liberal political institutions around the world are facing two crises: low (...)
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  2.  4
    Preparing for the Next Pandemic.Allen Buchanan - 2023 - Social Philosophy and Policy 40 (2):283-305.
    My aim in this essay is to argue for a better moral-conceptual framework and for institutional innovation in preparation for the next pandemic. My main conclusions are as follows. (1) The primary moral principle that should guide responses to the next pandemic is the duty to prevent and mitigate serious harms. (2) A proper understanding of the moral foundations and scope of the duty to prevent and mitigate serious harms requires rejecting both Extreme Nationalism and Extreme Cosmopolitanism. (3) A better (...)
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  3.  3
    Why Liberal Cosmopolitans Should Worry About Supply Chains.Tyler Cowen - 2023 - Social Philosophy and Policy 40 (2):351-371.
    The complexity of supply chains means that it is difficult to tell where national security arguments begin and end. That may weaken some of the traditional arguments for free trade for the same reasons that we accept the difficulty of rational economic calculation in a socialist society. National security arguments for protectionism may not remain restricted to very small and manageable segments of the economy. Liberals and cosmopolitans will need to pay greater heed to these problems. This essay also considers (...)
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  4.  1
    The Global Crisis and the Psychological Feasibility of Internationalism.Julian Culp - 2023 - Social Philosophy and Policy 40 (2):372-386.
    This essay revisits the metanormative version of the motivational critique of contemporary conceptions of cosmopolitan justice. I distinguish two ways of understanding this critique as leveling the charge of infeasibility against cosmopolitanism. Cosmopolitan motivation can be understood to be infeasible because it is impossible or because it is not reasonably likely to be achieved if tried. The possibilistic understanding is not persuasive, given that examples show that cosmopolitan motivation is possible. The conditional probabilistic understanding is more compelling, by contrast, because (...)
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  5.  1
    From Regions to the World: Global Crises From the Third Century to Today.Stephen Davies - 2023 - Social Philosophy and Policy 40 (2):455-481.
    Crises, defined as a period of acute stress on social systems of all kinds, are a recurrent feature of history. As such, they are best approached and understood from a comparative historical perspective. We can distinguish between those caused or precipitated by an exogenous shock and those that derive from an endogenous process that culminates in the crisis. Crises can be of short or long duration and range from local to global. The most severe are ones that lead to a (...)
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  6. Military Intervention in Interstate Armed Conflicts.Cécile Fabre - 2023 - Social Philosophy and Policy 40 (2):431-454.
    Suppose that state A attacks state D without warrant. The ensuing military conflict threatens international peace and security. State D (I assume) has a justification for defending itself by means of military force. Do third parties have a justification for intervening in that conflict by such means? To international public lawyers, the well-rehearsed and obvious answer is “yes.” Threats to international peace and security provide one of two exceptions to the legal and moral prohibition (as set out in Article 2[4] (...)
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  7.  1
    The Biodiversity Crisis, Biodiversity Hotspots, and Our Obligations with Respect to Them.Margaret Moore - 2023 - Social Philosophy and Policy 40 (2):482-502.
    This essay argues that we have a duty to protect biodiversity hotspots, rooted in an argument about the wrongful imposition of risk and intergenerational justice. State authority over territory and resources is not unlimited; the state has a duty to protect these areas. The essay argues that although biodiversity loss is a global problem, it can be tackled at the domestic level through clear rules. The argument thus challenges the usual view of state sovereignty, which holds that authority over territory, (...)
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  8.  2
    “Waving the Banner of Democracy”: Democratic Sanctions and Three Hypocrisy Puzzles.Shmuel Nili - 2023 - Social Philosophy and Policy 40 (2):408-430.
    This essay aims to advance the general discussion of hypocrisy in moral and political philosophy as well as normative policy debates regarding democratic sanctions against autocracies that often trigger charges of hypocrisy. In the process of making sense of these charges, I articulate and tackle three general puzzles regarding hypocrisy complaints. The first—the inaction puzzle—asks why a charge of hypocrisy should have any effect on the moral assessment of an agent’s actions, as distinct from the agent’s character or attitudes. The (...)
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  9.  3
    Is There a Place for Choice in Crisis Response?Govind Persad - 2023 - Social Philosophy and Policy 40 (2):329-350.
    In response to a crisis, policymakers face the decision of whether to enumerate specific actions the public must do or, instead, to aim at an overall outcome while leaving room open for choice. This essay evaluates the merits and demerits of crisis response that leaves room open for choice, with a particular focus on pandemic response. I evaluate two approaches: trades and offsets. Trades allow individuals or groups to exchange protection against harm or entitlement to engage in risky activity. Offsets (...)
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  10.  8
    Does Homo Sapiens Need a Recipe for Survival? Do We Have One?Alexander Rosenberg - 2023 - Social Philosophy and Policy 40 (2):503-523.
    It is argued that the natural and human vicissitudes of the Northern Hemisphere—or at least western European history between 1315 and 1648—provide a preview of the sort of consequences for humanity and its demography that will result from the serious if not catastrophic climate change that is now anticipated by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Game theory suggests that at least some nation-state players in the strategic problem that climate change raises will not choose Nash equilibria that mitigate (...)
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  11.  7
    Global Crises.David Schmidtz - 2023 - Social Philosophy and Policy 40 (2):273-282.
    Sometimes, we see crises coming. Sometimes, we can muster the resources we need to respond effectively. Sometimes, we can acquire the information we need to respond effectively.
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  12.  4
    Public Health, Public Health Ethics Principlism, and Good Governance During the Covid-19 Pandemic.Udo Schüklenk - 2023 - Social Philosophy and Policy 40 (2):306-328.
    The COVID-19 pandemic brought about at least two normative challenges on unprecedented scale for liberal democracies. One concerned prioritization decisions when health care resources were constrained. The other, which arguably led to lasting damage to social cohesion and citizens’ trust in government and government public health institutions, concerned policies introduced with the aim of reducing the spread of SARS-CoV2, some of which turned out to be mistaken. I discuss in this essay a few examples of misguided, liberty-limiting public health policies (...)
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  13.  8
    Rights and Revolution: Is There a Liberty to “Go It Alone”?Gopal Sreenivasan - 2023 - Social Philosophy and Policy 40 (2):387-407.
    John Locke affirms a right to revolt against tyranny, but he denies that a minority of citizens is at liberty to exercise it unless a majority of their fellow citizens concurs in their judgment that the government is a tyranny. In a recent article, Massimo Renzo takes an equivalent position, on which a revolutionary vanguard requires the consent of the domestic majority before being permitted to revolt. Against Locke and Renzo, I argue that a minority of citizens can have a (...)
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  14.  9
    Social Capital and the Role of the State: Nurturing Collectives for Poverty Alleviation.Arvind Kumar Chaudhary - 2023 - Social Philosophy and Policy 40 (1):233-259.
    For eradication of acute poverty, it is vital to factor in the human experience of it. Building social capital and networks that nurture, empower, and consistently reinforce a new shared economic identity can provide rich socioeconomic dividends. For states tackling extreme poverty at scale, building and strengthening social capital are essential public goods investments.
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  15.  10
    Poverty, Trust, and Social Distance: A Self-Reinforcing “Poverty Trap”?Almudena Fernández, Luis F. López-Calva & Santiago Rodríguez - 2023 - Social Philosophy and Policy 40 (1):129-149.
    We consider the concept of poverty from the asset-accumulation approach and propose an integrated framework, building upon existing theories, to describe how the interconnected factors of trust (or lack thereof) and social distance can reinforce poverty traps. Social distance is influenced by choice, while trust is the symptom that defines the strength of social ties on a group. We look at how an absence of trust influences how households make decisions about the use and accumulation of assets in ways that (...)
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  16.  6
    The Psychology of Poverty: Where Do We Stand?Johannes Haushofer & Daniel Salicath - 2023 - Social Philosophy and Policy 40 (1):150-184.
    In recent years, the psychological causes and consequences of poverty have received renewed attention from scientists and policymakers. In this essay, we summarize new developments in this literature. First, we discuss advances in our understanding of the relationship between income and psychological well-being. There is a robust positive relationship between the two, both within and across countries, and in correlational and causal analyses. Second, we summarize recent work on the impact of “scarcity” and stress on economic preferences and decision-making. Our (...)
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  17.  10
    Using Behavioral Economics to Reduce Poverty and Oppression.Karla Hoff & Allison Demeritt - 2023 - Social Philosophy and Policy 40 (1):185-209.
    Until recently, economics conceived of poverty solely as a lack of material resources. This view likely captures the reality of poverty experienced by many people around the globe. However, two waves of behavioral economics demonstrate that the narrowing of people’s external environments may change people themselves: poverty lowers the quality of decision-making and poverty and oppression may depress the capacity to aspire. Poverty and a history of oppression also change how individuals are perceived. To overcome these effects may require helping (...)
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  18.  21
    Group Rights, Gender Justice, and Women’s Self-Help Groups: Exit, Voice, and Loyalty in an Indigenous Community in India.Naila Kabeer, Nivedita Narain, Varnica Arora & Vinitika Lal - 2023 - Social Philosophy and Policy 40 (1):103-128.
    This essay addresses tensions within political philosophy between group rights, which allow historically marginalized communities some self-governance in determining its own rules and norms, and the rights of marginalized subgroups, such as women, within these communities. Community norms frequently uphold patriarchal structures that define women as inferior to men, assign them a subordinate status within the community, and cut them off from the individual rights enjoyed by women in other sections of society. As feminists point out, the capacity for voice (...)
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  19.  9
    The Importance of Choice: Catfish Man of the Woods Theory of Development.Claudia Williamson Kramer - 2023 - Social Philosophy and Policy 40 (1):260-271.
    The importance of economic freedom for economic development can no longer be denied. What is often denied, however, is respect for individuals’ rights and personal choices. The role of individual choice is often dismissed or set aside by the development community. In this essay, I argue that inherent to economic freedom’s economic success is the promotion and acceptance of individual choice. Development theory should include recognition of and respect for personal choices, a theory I call “Catfish Man of the Woods” (...)
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  20.  9
    Experimental Economics, Poverty, and Economic Growth.Charles N. Noussair - 2023 - Social Philosophy and Policy 40 (1):36-54.
    As in other sciences, an economic experiment is an artificial situation created by a researcher for the purpose of answering one or more scientific questions. Experiments of various types are used in economics to understand the causes of poverty and how it might be alleviated. The methods can identify causal relationships between variables and thereby isolate factors that can lead to poverty as well as to document the behavioral consequences of poverty. Experiments can also be used to provide test beds (...)
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  21.  10
    Freedom, Poverty, and Impact Rewards.Thomas Pogge - 2023 - Social Philosophy and Policy 40 (1):210-232.
    A free world is one in which human beings can live free, self-directed lives. A great obstacle to such a world is severe poverty, still blighting the lives of half of humankind. We have the resources, technologies, and administrative capacities to eradicate severe poverty, but doing so requires some restructuring of existing social arrangements. We might begin with the current regime governing innovation, which has monopoly markups as its key funding source. Such monopoly rents encourage the quest for innovations, but (...)
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  22.  8
    Poverty, Agency, and Development.Tauhidur Rahman - 2023 - Social Philosophy and Policy 40 (1):9-35.
    This essay provides an account of four interrelated ideas. First, a person who is not poor by the standard conception of poverty can still be functionally poor. Second, poverty is a relationship between the poor and their environment (community, local markets, and local institutions). Third, poverty is a determinant of agency and impedes its exercise. Fourth, promoting agency promotes development. I conclude that agency is central to understanding both poverty and development.
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  23.  15
    Time Poverty: Conceptualization, Gender Differences, and Policy Solutions.Yana Van Der Meulen Rodgers - 2023 - Social Philosophy and Policy 40 (1):79-102.
    Individuals with heavy paid and unpaid work burdens may experience time deprivations that restrict their well-being and put them at risk of becoming or remaining income poor. Because unpaid work outside of the market is not captured in most large survey-based datasets, time poverty is rarely recognized in policy and practice. Yet income poverty and time poverty are mutually reinforcing; they can sap energy and impede effective decision-making, thus perpetuating the state of poverty. This essay offers a five-step approach to (...)
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  24.  18
    Poverty.David Schmidtz - 2023 - Social Philosophy and Policy 40 (1):1-8.
    Poverty can be an ephemeral life stage of a young person whose skill sets will become more valuable with training and experience, a personal setback such as losing a job, or a systemic affliction that puts a whole community in danger of widespread famine. A common theme of this volume’s essays is that we cannot understand poverty and famine unless we acknowledge that poor people are not mouths to be fed but agents. Amartya Sen got this right, crediting Adam Smith (...)
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  25.  10
    Foreign Aid and Freedom.Fernando R. Tesón - 2023 - Social Philosophy and Policy 40 (1):55-78.
    This essay examines the many problems with public and private development aid and argues that global liberalization of trade and immigration would have a greater direct effect in reducing global poverty. It also examines and rejects the view that people in rich countries have a strong moral obligation to give to the global poor. Such an obligation is in tension with an ethic that prizes personal projects. A political morality of equal respect and concern is congenial not with foreign aid, (...)
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