Sophia

ISSNs: 0038-1527, 1873-930X

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  1.  39
    Cosmopsychism and the Problem of Evil.Harvey Cawdron - 2024 - Sophia 63 (1):151-167.
    Cosmopsychism, the idea that the universe is conscious, is experiencing something of a revival as an explanation of consciousness in philosophy of mind and is also making inroads into philosophy of religion. In the latter field, it has been used to formulate models of certain forms of theism, such as pantheism and panentheism, and has also been proposed as a rival to the classical theism of the Abrahamic faiths. It has been claimed by Philip Goff that a certain form of (...)
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  2.  23
    Would God Really Send Me to Hell for Stealing a Wispa Bar?Nikk Effingham - 2024 - Sophia 63 (1):85-97.
    This paper discusses the problem of Hell, defending the Aquinas-Anselm-Edwards response that any immoral act deserves eternal punishment because it offends against God. I argue that the response is more defensible than one might at first think, but nevertheless faces a serious objection. If we differentiate two different problems of Hell—the logical problem and the evidential problem—we see that, in light of this objection, the Aquinas-Anselm-Edwards response only solves the logical problem of Hell.
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  3.  6
    Correction to: Review of Hans Van Eyghen, The Epistemology of Spirit Beliefs. [REVIEW]Marcus William Hunt - 2024 - Sophia 63 (1):193-194.
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  4.  29
    Whither Transcendence? Immanence and Critique in The Self-Emptying Subject.Mohamad Jarada - 2024 - Sophia 63 (1):121-133.
    This paper engages Alex Dubilet’s _The Self-Emptying Subject: Kenosis and Immanence, Medieval to Modern_ and his account of immanence and kenosis as exhibited in his reading of Hegel’s concept of _Entäußerung_ [externalization]. Specifically, I focus on the “problematic of desubjectivation” that centers Dubilet’s critique of transcendence and its relationship to subjection and subjectivity. I reconsider the relationship made between this problematic, the ethics of kenosis, and the concept of immanence so as to demonstrate the ways in which Dubilet attempts to (...)
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  5.  19
    Gappying Curry Redux.Jeremiah Joven Joaquin - 2024 - Sophia 63 (1):5-11.
    In ‘Currying omnipotence: A reply to Beall and Cotnoir’, Andrew Tedder and Guillermo Badia argue that Jc Beall and A. J. Cotnoir’s gappy solution to the traditional paradox of unrestricted omnipotence does not extend to a Curry-like version of the paradox. In this paper, we show that it does extend to it.
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  6.  68
    The Strange Implications for Bioethics of Taking Christianity Seriously.Stephen Kershnar - 2024 - Sophia 63 (1).
    In this paper, I argue for two theses. First, if Christianity is true, then morality should depend on the metaphysics of the afterlife. Second, if Christianity is true, then contemporary moral theory is mistaken. The argument for the first thesis rests on two premises. If rightness depends on an act’s effects on an individual, then—at least in part—it depends on the long-term effects on him. If rightness depends—at least in part—on the long-term effects on an individual, then it depends on (...)
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  7. Natural Theology and Divine Freedom.Philipp Kremers - 2024 - Sophia 63 (1):135-150.
    Many philosophers of theistic religions claim (1) that there are powerful a posteriori arguments for God’s existence that make it rational to believe that He exists and at the same time maintain (2) that God always has the freedom to do otherwise. In this article, I argue that these two positions are inconsistent because the empirical evidence on which the a posteriori arguments for God’s existence rest can be explained better by positing the existence of a God-like being without the (...)
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  8.  23
    A Naturalistic Theodicy for Sterba’s Problem of Natural Evil.Dwayne Moore - 2024 - Sophia 63 (1):169-188.
    In a series of writings, James Sterba introduces several novel arguments from evil against the existence of God (Sterba, 2019; Sterba Sophia 59, 501–512, 2020; Sterba International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 87, 203–208, 2020b; Sterba International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 87, 223–228, 2020c; Sterba Religions 12, 536, 2021). According to one of these arguments, the problem of natural evil, God must necessarily prevent the horrendous evil consequences of natural evil such as diseases and hurricanes; however, these horrendous evil (...)
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  9.  21
    Fleeing the Absolute: Derrida and the Problem of Anti-Hegelianism.Gregory S. Moss - 2024 - Sophia 63 (1):99-120.
    Derrida defines différance as the “interruption of Hegelian dialectics.” Although scholars have noted that Derrida pursues his critique of Hegel by means of Hegelian concepts, the way that Derrida employs specific Hegelian concepts in his critique, such as non-positionality, self-reference, and contradiction, has not been sufficiently investigated. In this essay, I reconstruct Derrida’s critique of Hegel with special focus on the Hegelian concepts of non-positionality, self-reference, and contradiction.
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  10.  8
    J. N. (Jitendra Nath) Mohanty.David Woodruff Smith & Purushottama Bilimoria - 2024 - Sophia 63 (1):1-4.
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  11.  25
    God’s Love and the Horrendous Deeds Objection: a Response to Flannagan.Jason Thibodeau - 2024 - Sophia 63 (1):43-56.
    The horrendous deeds objection to metaethical divine command theory (MDCT) says that since God can command anything whatsoever, even things that are horrendous, MDCT seems to imply that God can make any action, no matter how repugnant, morally obligatory. Defenders of MDCT frequently claim, by way of response, that since God is essentially omnibenevolent, it is impossible that he commands us to do horrendous things. I have recently argued that it is irrelevant that God cannot issue horrible commands. The argument (...)
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  12.  72
    Wes Morriston’s ‘Skeptical Demonism’ Argument from Evil and Timothy Perrine’s Response.Michael Tooley - 2024 - Sophia 63 (1):57-83.
    Wes Morriston has argued that given the mixture of goods and evils found in the world, the probability of God’s existence is much less than the probability of a creator who is indifferent to good and evil. One of my goals here is, first, to show how, by bringing in the concept of dispositions, Morriston’s argument can be expressed in a rigorous, step-by-step fashion, and then, second, to show how one can connect the extent to which different events are surprising (...)
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  13.  42
    The Psychopath Challenge to Divine Command Theory: Reply to Flannagan.Erik J. Wielenberg - 2024 - Sophia 63 (1):35-42.
    Erik Wielenberg has presented an objection to divine command theory (DCT) alleging that DCT has the troubling implication that psychopaths have no moral obligations. Matthew Flannagan has replied to Wielenberg’s argument. Here, I defend the view that, despite Flannagan’s reply, the psychopath objection presents a serious problem for the versions of DCT defended by its most prominent contemporary advocates — Robert Adams, C. Stephen Evans, and William Lane Craig.
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  14.  30
    Review of Hans Van Eyghen, The Epistemology of Spirit Beliefs[REVIEW]Marcus William Hunt - 2024 - Sophia (1):1-4.
    Review of Hans Van Eyghen, The Epistemology of Spirit Beliefs. New York: Routledge, ISBN 9781032249988, hbk, 168pp.
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  15.  7
    What if A Teleological Conception of Value is False?Benjamin Elmore - 2024 - Sophia:1-8.
    In this paper, I will critique Paul Draper’s recent model of God’s motivational structure, according to which God can make hard choices. I will argue that this model illegitimately treats value in a purely teleological way, as something to be promoted. Following T.M. Scanlon’s work on value theory, when we consider the fact that value is to be respected rather than merely promoted, this realization will significantly foreclose on the possible cases in which hard choices can conceivably be made by (...)
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