57 found

Year:

  1.  7
    Engaging with Buddhism.Anita Avramides - 2018 - Sophia 57 (4):547-558.
    In his new book, Jay Garfield invites philosophers of all persuasions to engage with Buddhist philosophy. In part I of this paper, I raise some questions on behalf of the philosopher working in the analytic tradition about the way in which Buddhist philosophy understands itself. I then turn, in part II, to look at what Orthodox Buddhism has to say about the self. I examine the debate between the Buddhist position discussed and endorsed by Garfield and that of a lesser-known (...)
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  2.  5
    On Engaging Buddhism Philosophically.Christian Coseru - 2018 - Sophia 57 (4):535-545.
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  3.  6
    Language and Extra-Linguistic Reality in Bhartṛhari’s Vākyapadīya.Evgeniya Desnitskaya - 2018 - Sophia 57 (4):643-659.
    Relation between language and extra-linguistic reality is an important problem of Bhartṛhari’s linguistic philosophy. In the ‘Vākyapadīya,’ this problem is discussed several times, but in accordance with the general perspectivist trend of Bhartṛhari’s philosophy each time it is framed through different concepts and different solutions are provided. In this essay, an attempt is undertaken to summarize the variety of different and mutually exclusive views on language and extra-linguistic reality in VP and to formulate the hidden presuppositions on which the actual (...)
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  4.  18
    From Yogācāra to Philosophical Tantra in Kashmir and Tibet.Douglas Duckworth - 2018 - Sophia 57 (4):611-623.
    This paper outlines a shift in the role of self-awareness from Yogācāra to tantra and connects some of the dots between Yogācāra, Pratyabhijñā, and Buddhist tantric traditions in Tibet. As is the case with Yogācāra, the Pratyabhijñā tradition of Utpaladeva maintains that awareness is self-illuminating and constitutive of objects. Utpaladeva’s commentator and influential successor, Abhinavagupta, in fact quotes Dharmakīrti’s argument from the Pramāṇaviniścaya that objects are necessarily perceived objects. That is, everything known is known in consciousness; there is nothing that (...)
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  5.  5
    Engaging Engagements with Engaging Buddhism.Jay Garfield - 2018 - Sophia 57 (4):581-590.
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  6.  16
    Moral Agency and the Paradox of Self-Interested Concern for the Future in Vasubandhu’s Abhidharmakośabhāṣya.Oren Hanner - 2018 - Sophia 57 (4):591-609.
    It is a common view in modern scholarship on Buddhist ethics, that attachment to the self constitutes a hindrance to ethics, whereas rejecting this type of attachment is a necessary condition for acting morally. The present article argues that in Vasubandhu's theory of agency, as formulated in the Abhidharmakośabhāṣya (Treasury of Metaphysics with Self-Commentary), a cognitive and psychological identification with a conventional, persisting self is a requisite for exercising moral agency. As such, this identification is essential for embracing the ethics (...)
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  7.  1
    Review of Jim Forest, At Play In The Lion’s Den: A Biography and Memoir of Daniel Berrigan. [REVIEW]Reg Naulty - 2018 - Sophia 57 (4):669-671.
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  8.  2
    Instrumentalist Interpretations of Hindu Environmental Ethics.Roy W. Perrett - 2018 - Sophia 57 (4):661-668.
    Many environmental ethicists believe that any adequate environmental ethic should attribute ‘direct moral standing’ to plants, animals, and the rest of nature. But certain interpretations of Hindu environmental ethics apparently attribute only instrumental value to nature. This places them in direct conflict with the purported adequacy condition on an environmental ethic. So, is such a Hindu ethical view really inadequate? In his recent book Hinduism and Environmental Ethics, Christopher Framarin claims that it is because Hindu instrumentalism about nature is either (...)
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  9.  9
    Consciousness, Idealism, and Skepticism: Reflections on Jay Garfield’s Engaging Buddhism.Eric Schwitzgebel - 2018 - Sophia 57 (4):559-563.
    Jay Garfield’s Engaging Buddhism admirably shows the relevance of Indian philosophy to the interests of mainstream analytic Anglophone philosophers. Garfield deploys the Indian tradition to critique phenomenal realism, the view that there really are qualia or phenomenal properties—that there really is ‘something it’s like’ to be undergoing the experience you are undergoing right now. I argue that Garfield’s critique probably turns on a false dilemma that omits the possibility of introspection as a fallible tool for getting at a real stream (...)
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  10.  6
    Sellarsian Buddhism Comments on Jay Garfield, Engaging Buddhism: Why It Matters to Philosophy.Evan Thompson - 2018 - Sophia 57 (4):565-579.
    This paper critically examines Jay Garfield’s accounts of the self, consciousness, and phenomenology in his book, Engaging Buddhism: Why It Matters to Philosophy. I argue that Garfield’s views on these topics are shaped, in problematic ways, by views he takes over from Wilfrid Sellars and applies to Buddhist philosophy.
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  11.  5
    Theorizing Nationalism: A Buddhist Perspective.Saul Tobias - 2018 - Sophia 57 (4):625-642.
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  12.  2
    Indian Philosophy and Ethics: Dialogical Method as a Fresh Possibility.Muzaffar Ali - 2018 - Sophia 57 (3):443-455.
    This paper discusses the positions held by two opposing camps—the traditionalists and the positivists regarding the presence or absence of ethics in Indian philosophy. It subsequently offers a way ahead of the impasse where I consider some inputs inherent in the method of dialogue in pre-modern Indian philosophy for imagining an ethics of and ethics for plurality. Such an ethics, I argue, cannot be imagined without involving the category of ‘Other,’ which has otherwise remained elusive in the Indian philosophical debates. (...)
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  13.  4
    Lala Lajpat Rai’s Classification of Nationalism: Can It Help Us to Understand Contemporary Nationalist Movements?Nalini Bhushan & Jay L. Garfield - 2018 - Sophia 57 (3):363-374.
    India has been independent for 70 years now, and it is a good time to reflect on the political philosophy that underwrote the movement that gained that independence. When we do so, we discover the origins of a political vocabulary that is still in use today, although sadly not used with the same rigor and precision with which it was used then. We also find that those who recur to Indian political thought from the pre-independence period tend to return to (...)
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  14.  2
    Politics of Addressing, Problems of Reception: To Whom Are Anglophone Indian Philosophers Speaking?Elise Coquereau-Saouma - 2018 - Sophia 57 (3):489-500.
    The demand for the recognition of non-Western philosophy has often brought about the opposition of substantialized entities such as ‘India’ and the ‘West,’ which has nourished the drifts of nationalistic rhetoric. As a decolonizing process but also as a deconstruction of nationalistic revivals, it is necessary to investigate the presuppositions involved when defining ‘Indian philosophy’ in these post-colonial demands for recognition. Considering that the understanding of what is ‘Indian philosophy’ and its claim for recognition is a prerequisite for its reception, (...)
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  15.  5
    Contemporary Indian Philosophy: Why It Is Worth Taking Up the Challenge.Elise Coquereau-Saouma & Elisa Freschi - 2018 - Sophia 57 (3):357-361.
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  16.  1
    Review of Miklós Vassányi, Enikő Sepsi, and Anikó Daróczi , The Immediacy of Mystical Experience in the European Tradition. [REVIEW]Peter Gan - 2018 - Sophia 57 (3):533-534.
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  17.  2
    The Tyranny of Taxonomy Sexuality and Anomaly.Patrick Hutchings - 2018 - Sophia 57 (3):521-532.
    Human sexuality is not binary: this, although counter-intuitive initially, is a medical fact. Homo-sexuality was an anomaly under a M/F taxonomy, and so ‘unnatural’ and ‘an abomination’. It is a mere statistical anomaly: it is a fact of Nature, nevertheless. Doctrines of Natural Law must recognize that even if Nature is stable, the notion/word ‘Nature’ is a shifter. As medical and other sciences amend our understanding of Nature, the idea of ‘Nature’ shifts. Natural Law theory is – and must continue (...)
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  18.  3
    Representing Indian Philosophy Through the Nation: An Exploration of the Public Philosopher Radhakrishnan.Monika Kirloskar-Steinbach - 2018 - Sophia 57 (3):375-387.
    Several authors working on cross-cultural philosophy underscore that a cross-cultural conversational space, which breaks away from dominant theoretical frameworks, is necessary for a genuine cross-cultural dialog. This paper too seeks to contribute to the development of such a space. To this end, its focus will lie on one salient representation of Indian philosophy in the postcolonial context: the ‘Report of the University Education Commission’ of 1948–1949. The paper will analyze how this document marries shared values like freedom and equality with (...)
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  19.  8
    Religious Commitment and the Benefits of Cognitive Diversity: A Reply to Trakakis.Kirk Lougheed - 2018 - Sophia 57 (3):501-513.
    Metaphilosophical discussions about the philosophy of religion are increasingly common. In a recent article in Sophia, N.N. Trakakis advances the view that Christian Philosophy is closer to ideology than philosophy. This is because philosophy conducted in the Socratic tradition tends to emphasize values antithetical to religious faith such as independence of thought, rationality, empiricism, and doubt. A philosopher must be able to follow the arguments wherever they lead, something that the religious believer cannot do. I argue that there are two (...)
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  20. Reading Derrida with Daya Krishna: Postmodern Trends in Contemporary Indian Philosophy.Dor Miller - 2018 - Sophia 57 (3):425-442.
    In his published lectures Civilizations: Nostalgia and Utopia, Daya Krishna criticizes postmodern thought and especially the writings of Jacques Derrida. By outlining similarities between the two, I would claim that, indeed, it was Daya Krishna’s unexpected proximity to Derrida’s ‘deconstruction’ project that triggered his scathing critique of the latter. Moreover, Daya Krishna’s response to Derrida reveals an ongoing inner conflict in his own thinking. On the one hand, he provides us with a harsh critique of Derrida the ‘postmodern’; on the (...)
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  21.  6
    Rethinking Advaita Within the Colonial Predicament: The ‘Confrontative’ Philosophy of K. C. Bhattacharyya.Pawel Odyniec - 2018 - Sophia 57 (3):405-424.
    I shall examine in this paper the distinctive way in which the prominent Indian philosopher Krishnachandra Bhattacharyya engaged with Advaita Vedānta during the terminal phase of the colonial period. I propose to do this by looking, first, at ways in which Krishnachandra understood the role of his own philosophizing within the colonial predicament. I will call this his agenda in ‘confrontative’ philosophy. I shall proceed, then, by sketching out the unique manner in which this agenda was successfully enacted through his (...)
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  22.  2
    ‘Philosophy in India’ or ‘Indian Philosophy’: Some Post-Colonial Questions.Bhagat Oinam - 2018 - Sophia 57 (3):457-473.
    Mode of philosophizing in post-colonial India is deeply influenced by two centuries of British rule, wherein a popular divide emerged between doing classical Indian philosophy and Western philosophy. However, a closer look reveals that the divide is not exclusive, since there are several criss-cross modes of philosophizing shaped by the forces of colonialism and nationalist consciousness. Contemporary challenges lie in raising new philosophical questions relevant to our time, keeping in view both what has been inherited and what has been imbibed (...)
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  23.  4
    Bending Deleuze and Guattari for India: Re-Examining the Relation Between Art and Politics in Europe and India.A. Raghuramaraju - 2018 - Sophia 57 (3):475-487.
    Identifying the limitations in earlier attempts for comparing Euro-American philosophy with Indian, the paper distinguishes its approach and makes a case for an alternative approach. This consists of bending the Euro-American philosophy, without breaking it, for use in India. Following the discussion of major and minor literatures by Deleuze and Guattari in the context of Kafka in Europe, the paper shows the variance between its claims in the context of minor literature and the reality. In this context, it establishes a (...)
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  24.  1
    That in the Martyā Which is Amṛta: A Dialog with Ramchandra Gandhi.Daniel Raveh - 2018 - Sophia 57 (3):389-404.
    This philosophical meditation, which deals with death as question, presence, and even teacher, begins with Ramchandra Gandhi’s penetrating essay ‘On Meriting Death.’ What does it mean ‘to merit’ death? To provide an answer, I travel through RCG’s corpus, in dialog with contemporary theorists such as Sri Aurobindo, Daya Krishna, and Mukund Lath. RCG implies that the question about ‘meriting’ death, and life, is not and cannot be ‘personal’ or ‘isolated’. For X to die, is for his close and distant samāj (...)
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  25.  3
    The Undeniable Reality of Evil: A Response to W.J. Mander.Alex Yousif - 2018 - Sophia 57 (3):515-519.
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  26.  13
    Blaming the Buddha: Buddhism and Moral Responsibility.Bobby Bingle - 2018 - Sophia 57 (2):295-311.
    This paper answers the question ‘what does Buddhism say about free will?’ I begin by investigating Charles Goodman’s influential answer, according to which Buddhists reject getting angry at wrongdoers because they believe that people are not morally responsible. Despite putative evidence to the contrary, Goodman’s interpretation of Buddhism is problematic on three counts: Buddhist texts do not actually support rejection of moral responsibility; Goodman’s argument has the unwanted upshot of undermining positive attitudes like compassion, which Buddhism unambiguously endorses; and his (...)
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  27.  5
    Call or Question: A Rehabilitation of Conscience as Dialogical.Nathan Dickman - 2018 - Sophia 57 (2):275-294.
    It is by way of the call that one is enabled to wake up to responsibility. What is the illocutionary mood of the ‘call’ of conscience, though? Is this transcendental enabler of responsibility an imposing demand or an invitational question? Both Levinas and Heidegger emphasize the impositional character of the call in conscience. The call seems to be the very essence of imperatives. I develop an apology for questioning by way of appeal to crumbs scattered throughout Jewish traditions as well (...)
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  28.  22
    The Problem with the Satan Hypothesis: Natural Evil and Fallen Angel Theodicies.Kent Dunnington - 2018 - Sophia 57 (2):265-274.
    In contemporary discussions of natural evil, one classically important theodicy—variously called warfare theodicy, fallen angel theodicy, or the Satan hypothesis—is rarely mentioned, let alone defended. This is the view that so-called natural evil, the evil suffered by sentient beings that is not caused by human agency, is caused by angelic agency, specifically that of Satan and other fallen angels. Although the Satan hypothesis has received scant attention in contemporary philosophy of religion, Richard Swinburne, Michael Martin, Robert Adams, and David O’Connor (...)
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  29.  74
    A Nirvana That Is Burning in Hell: Pain and Flourishing in Mahayana Buddhist Moral Thought.Stephen E. Harris - 2018 - Sophia 57 (2):337-347.
    This essay analyzes the provocative image of the bodhisattva, the saint of the Indian Mahayana Buddhist tradition, descending into the hell realms to work for the benefit of its denizens. Inspired in part by recent attempts to naturalize Buddhist ethics, I argue that taking this ‘mythological’ image seriously, as expressing philosophical insights, helps us better understand the shape of Mahayana value theory. In particular, it expresses a controversial philosophical thesis: the claim that no amount of physical pain can disrupt the (...)
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  30.  2
    Exploring the Buddhist Middle Way From a Middle Ground: In Memoriam Steven Collins.Charles Hallisey - 2018 - Sophia 57 (2):203-206.
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  31.  15
    Buddhism as Reductionism: Personal Identity and Ethics in Parfitian Readings of Buddhist Philosophy; From Steven Collins to the Present.Oren Hanner - 2018 - Sophia 57 (2):211-231.
    Derek Parfit’s early work on the metaphysics of persons has had a vast influence on Western philosophical debates about the nature of personal identity and moral theory. Within the study of Buddhism, it also has sparked a continuous comparative discourse, which seeks to explicate Buddhist philosophical principles in light of Parfit’s conceptual framework. Examining important Parfitian-inspired studies of Buddhist philosophy, this article points out various ways in which a Parfitian lens shaped, often implicitly, contemporary understandings of the anātman doctrine and (...)
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  32.  9
    Review of Paolo Diego Bubbio, God and the Self in Hegel: Beyond Subjectivism. [REVIEW]Kevin Harrelson - 2018 - Sophia 57 (2):349-351.
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  33.  2
    A Nirvana That Is Burning in Hell: Pain and Flourishing in Mahayana Buddhist Moral Thought.Stephen Harris - 2018 - Sophia 57 (2):337-347.
    This essay analyzes the provocative image of the bodhisattva, the saint of the Indian Mahayana Buddhist tradition, descending into the hell realms to work for the benefit of its denizens. Inspired in part by recent attempts to naturalize Buddhist ethics, I argue that taking this ‘mythological’ image seriously, as expressing philosophical insights, helps us better understand the shape of Mahayana value theory. In particular, it expresses a controversial philosophical thesis: the claim that no amount of physical pain can disrupt the (...)
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  34.  1
    Collins and Parfit Three Decades On.Matthew Kapstein - 2018 - Sophia 57 (2):207-210.
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  35.  11
    The Unreality of Evil.W. Mander - 2018 - Sophia 57 (2):249-264.
    The simplest response to the problem of evil is to deny that there exists any evil, but that answer is usually dismissed as obviously unacceptable. This paper takes issue with that assessment and argues that it is an answer deserving of serious consideration. After rejecting four manifestly unacceptable formulations, two further conceptions are identified—the ‘higher standard’ and ‘wider perspective’ answers—which merit closer attention. The remainder of the paper considers and responds to four main objections to the theory: that it runs (...)
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  36.  8
    Karmic Imprints, Exclusion, and the Creation of the Worlds of Conventional Experience in Dharmakīrti’s Thought.Catherine Prueitt - 2018 - Sophia 57 (2):313-335.
    Dharmakīrti’s apoha theory of concept formation aims to provide an account of intersubjectivity without relying on the existence of real universals. He uses the pan-Yogācāra theory of karmic imprints to claim that sentient beings form concepts by treating unique particulars as if a certain subset of them had the same effects. Since this judgment of sameness depends on an individual's habits, desires, and sensory capacities, and these in turn depend on the karmic imprints developed over countless lifetimes and continuously reshaped (...)
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  37.  16
    The Problem of Grounding: Schelling on the Metaphysics of Evil.Gavin Rae - 2018 - Sophia 57 (2):233-248.
    Long neglected, Schelling’s 1809 Philosophical Investigations into the Essence of Human Freedom has been the subject of renewed contemporary interest with scholars linking it to debates in ontology, psychology, and social philosophy. This paper argues, however, that its fundamental importance lies in bringing to our attention the way in which our moral categories are grounded in conceptions of metaphysics. To do so, it suggests that Schelling focuses on two questions: first, does evil have positive being? And second, why do some (...)
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  38.  2
    In Communion with God’s Sparrow: Incorporating Animal Agency Into the Environmental Vision of Laudato Sí.Mary Ashley - 2018 - Sophia 57 (1):103-118.
    Although a conventional environmentalism focuses on the health of ecological systems, Pope Francis’s 2015 environmental encyclical Laudato Sí invokes St. Francis of Assisi to emphasize God’s love for the individual organism, no matter how small. Decrying the tendency to regard other creatures as mere objects to be controlled and used, Pope Francis urges our enactment of a ‘universal communion’ governed by love. I suggest, however, that Laudato Sí’s animal ethic, as focused on ordering human and animal need, is inadequate to (...)
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  39.  3
    Animal Justice and Moral Mendacity.Purushottama Bilimoria - 2018 - Sophia 57 (1):53-67.
    I wish to take up some of the sentiments we have towards animals and put them to test in respect of the claims to moral high grounds in Indian thought-traditions vis-à-vis Abrahamic theologies. And I do this by turning the focus in this instance—on a par with issues of caste, gender, minority status, albeit still within the human community ambience—to the question of animals. Which leads me to ask how sophisticated and in-depth is the appreciation of the issues and questions (...)
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  40.  7
    Animal Ethics.Christopher Chapple - 2018 - Sophia 57 (1):69-83.
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  41. Review of William Desmond, The Intimate Universal: The Hidden Porosity Among Religion, Art, Philosophy and Politics. [REVIEW]Richard Colledge - 2018 - Sophia 57 (1):197-199.
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  42.  1
    Animality in Lacan and Derrida: The Deconstruction of the Other.Zeynep Direk - 2018 - Sophia 57 (1):21-37.
    In The Beast and the Sovereign, Derrida’s last seminar, Derrida criticizes Lacan for making no room for animality in the Other, in the unconscious transindividual normativity of language. In this paper, I take into account the history of Derrida’s interactions with Lacan’s psychoanalysis to argue that Derrida’s early agreement with Lacan’s conception of subjectivity as split by the signifier gives place in his late thought to a deconstruction of Lacan’s fall into humanist metaphysics, which makes a sharp moral distinction between (...)
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  43.  2
    The Question of Human Animality in Heidegger.Chad Engelland - 2018 - Sophia 57 (1):39-52.
    Heidegger thinks that humans enjoy openness to being, an openness that distinguishes them from all other entities, animals included. To safeguard openness to being, Heidegger denies that humans are animals. This position attracts the criticism of Derrida, who denies the difference between humans and animals and with it the human openness to being. In this paper, I argue that human difference and human animality are not mutually exclusive. Heidegger has the conceptual resources in his thought and in the history of (...)
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  44.  8
    Loke on the Infinite God Objection.Jacobus Erasmus - 2018 - Sophia 57 (1):151-156.
    In a recent article, Andrew Ter Ern Loke raises several objections to Jacobus Erasmus and Anné Hendrik Verhoef’s exposition and response to the so-called ‘Infinite God Objection’ to the kalām cosmological argument. According to this objection, the argument against the possibility of an actual infinite brings into question the view that God’s knowledge is infinite. Erasmus and Verhoef’s solution to this objection, which Loke criticises, depends on an unusual account of omniscience. In this article, I respond to Loke and show (...)
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  45.  14
    Divine Command Theory and Horrendous Deeds: A Reply to Wielenberg.Gerald Harrison - 2018 - Sophia 57 (1):173-187.
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  46.  8
    Lessons From ‘The Hawk and the Dove’: Reflections on the Mahābhārata’s Animal Parables and Ethical Predicaments.Veena Howard - 2018 - Sophia 57 (1):119-131.
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  47.  43
    An All Too Radical Solution to the Problem of Evil: A Reply to Harrison.Dan Linford - 2018 - Sophia 57 (1):157-171.
    Gerald Harrison has recently argued the evidential problem of evil can be resolved if we assume the moral facts are identical to God’s commands or favorings. On a theistic metaethics, the moral facts are identical to what God commands or favors. Our moral intuitions reflect what God commands or favors for us to do, but not what God favors for Herself to do. Thus, on Harrison’s view, while we can know the moral facts as they pertain to humans, we cannot (...)
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  48.  3
    Animal Ethics and Hinduism’s Milking, Mothering Legends: Analysing Krishna the Butter Thief and the Ocean of Milk.Yamini Narayanan - 2018 - Sophia 57 (1):133-149.
    The Hindu ethic of cow protectionism is legislatively interpreted in many Indian states through the criminalisation of cow slaughter, and beef consumption, obscuring dairying’s direct role in the butchery of spent female and unproductive male bovines. Cow milk, however, is celebrated as sacred in scriptural and ritual Hinduism, and mobilised by commercial dairying, as well as by right-wing Hindu groups to advance the idea of a Hindu Indian nation. In order to fully protect cows from the harms of human exploitation, (...)
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  49.  10
    Review of Richard Dawkins, Science In The Soul: Selected Writings Of A Passionate Rationalist. [REVIEW]Reg Naulty - 2018 - Sophia 57 (1):201-202.
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  50.  52
    Review of Yujin Nagasawa, Maximal God: A New Defence of Perfect Being Theism. [REVIEW]Graham Oppy - 2018 - Sophia 57 (1):189-191.
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  51. How Not to Lie About God: A Review of Elliot Wolfson’s Giving Beyond the Gift : Apophasis an Overcoming Theomania. [REVIEW]Eric R. Severson - 2018 - Sophia 57 (1):193-195.
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  52.  11
    Animals with Soul.Joshua Thurow - 2018 - Sophia 57 (1):85-101.
    I argue that ensouled animalism—the view that we are identical to animals that have immaterial souls as parts—has a pair of advantages over its two nearest rivals, materialistic animalism and pure dualism. Contra pure dualism, ensouled animalism can explain how physical predications can be literally true of us. Contra materialistic animalism, ensouled animalism can explain how animals can survive death. Furthermore, ensouled animalism has these advantages without creating any problems beyond those already faced by animalism and by belief in souls. (...)
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  53.  18
    Against Animal Liberation? Peter Singer and His Critics.Gonzalo Villanueva - 2018 - Sophia 57 (1):5-19.
    This article explores Peter Singer’s Animal Liberation thesis and examines the arguments against his work, particularly from certain moral philosophers in the late 1970s and 1980s who seriously engaged with his ideas. This article argues that due to the straightforward, minimalist nature of Singer’s preference utilitarianism, his arguments have remained highly defensible and persuasive. By advancing sentience, above characteristics like intelligence or rationality, as a sufficient criterion for possessing interests, Singer provides a justifiable principle for morally considering animal interests equal (...)
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  54.  5
    Special Issue on Animals and Philosophy.Gonzalo Villanueva - 2018 - Sophia 57 (1):1-4.
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  55. Percepción docente del fenómeno de la repitencia en LICEL-UIS.Hugo Armando Arciniegas Díaz, Pamela Andrea Suárez Cruz & Sergio Andrés Carreño Carrillo - 2018 - Sophia 14 (2):106.
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  56. Ingeniería didáctica para el aprendizaje de la función lineal mediante la modelación de situaciones.Milton Cesar Campeón Becerra, Eliecer Aldana Bermudez & Jhony Alexander Villa Ochoa - 2018 - Sophia 14 (2):115.
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    Investigación y ciencia: implicaciones para un docente investigador en el sistema colombiano.Ana María Mosquera Ayala - 2018 - Sophia 14 (2):1.
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