47 found

Year:

  1.  1
    World Between Chaos and Homogeneity: A Review Discussion of The Clasp of Civilizations by Richard Hartz.Debashish Banerji - 2016 - Sophia 55 (4):585-590.
    Our world is increasingly torn between the cultural polarities of a homogenized neo-liberal globalization and a variety of exclusionary fundamentalisms. The text being discussed opens a third space of what it calls ‘convergent pluralism’ between these two, that promises to evolve a harmonious planetary future. The present article discusses the analyses and solutions offered by the book as well as the constructive attitudes and engagements needed to make this third space a reality.
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  2.  1
    Editorial: Bimal Krishna Matilal, 1935–1991.Purushottama Bilimoria & Jay L. Garfield - 2016 - Sophia 55 (4):455-458.
  3.  5
    Remembering Matilal on Remembering.Arindam Chakrabarti - 2016 - Sophia 55 (4):459-476.
    Although memory is pivotal to consciousness and without it no perceptual judgment or thinking is possible, Nyāya epistemology does not accept memory as a knowledge source. Prof Matilal elucidates and defends Udayana’s justification for calling into question the knowledgehood or even truth of any recollection. Deepening Matilal’s argument, this paper first shows why, if a remembering reproduces exactly the original experience from which it borrows its truth-claim, then there is a mismatch between the time of experience and the time of (...)
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  4.  4
    Computational Traits in Navya-Nyāya?Amita Chatterjee - 2016 - Sophia 55 (4):543-551.
    I would like to introduce the problematic to be addressed in this short article simply as follows. According to the majority of the modern interpreters of the Nyāya philosophy, the Naiyāyika-s are ontologically committed to an uncompromising direct realist theory of perception and to externalism both in epistemology and philosophy of mind. Computationalists, on the other hand, in their ontology, are frank or secret supporters of the view that what we cognize, even what we perceive, is representational. These two claims (...)
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  5. Review of Sharad Deshpande , Philosophy in Colonial India. [REVIEW]Amitabha Dasgupta - 2016 - Sophia 55 (4):577-580.
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  6.  1
    When a Philosopher’s Stone Turns Gold Into Base Metal.Richard P. Hayes - 2016 - Sophia 55 (4):517-526.
    An account of how certain presuppositions led the author astray in previous attempts at interpreting a key metaphor in Śāntideva’s Bodhicaryāvatāra 1.10.
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  7. Review of Wayne Hudson, Australian Religious Thought. [REVIEW]Constant J. Mews - 2016 - Sophia 55 (4):581-583.
  8.  1
    Gandhi and Tagore on the Idea of the Surplus, Creativity and Freedom: In Conversation with Richard Sorabji.Bindu Puri - 2016 - Sophia 55 (4):563-572.
    This paper is in conversation with Richard Sorabji’s reading of the Gandhi Tagore debate. On Sorabji’s account freedom was an important issue in that debate as Gandhi was unable to appreciate Tagore’s emphasis on individual freedom as creativity. While I agree that freedom was an important issue, I argue that Gandhi understood and employed the resources made available by individual creativity. The differences arose because Gandhi thought of freedom as creativity primarily in moral rather than aesthetic terms.
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  9.  5
    A Survey of Modern Scholars’ Views on Śaṃkara’s Authorship of the Bhagavadgītābhāṣya.Niranjan Saha - 2016 - Sophia 55 (4):573-576.
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  10.  1
    The Paradox of Ineffability: Matilal and Early Wittgenstein.Priyambada Sarkar - 2016 - Sophia 55 (4):527-541.
    Bimal Krishna Matilal was interested in the paradoxes of the ineffability of mystical experiences throughout his career. He was all eager to prove that the concept of mysticism in Indian tradition had its own strong logic, which had helped its proponents overcome the charges of being ‘self-refuting’. In various articles, Matilal had analysed various formulations of the logic of ineffability in various systems of Indian philosophy and examined various ways to get out of the logical paradoxes. While discussing the paradox (...)
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  11.  2
    Śruti as a Means of Establishing Ajñāna.Prabal Kumar Sen - 2016 - Sophia 55 (4):477-489.
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  12.  1
    Tagore in Debate with Gandhi: Freedom as Creativity.Richard Sorabji - 2016 - Sophia 55 (4):553-562.
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  13.  3
    Absence: An Indo-Analytic Inquiry.Anand Jayprakash Vaidya, Purushottama Bilimoria & Jaysankar L. Shaw - 2016 - Sophia 55 (4):491-513.
    Two of the most important contributions that Bimal Krishna Matilal made to comparative philosophy are his doctoral dissertation The Navya-Nyāya Doctrine of Negation: The Semantics and Ontology of Negative Statements in Navya-Nyāya Philosophy and his classic: Perception: An Essay on Classical Indian Theories of Knowing. In this essay, we aim to carry forward the work of Bimal K. Matilal by showing how ideas in classical Indian philosophy concerning absence and perception are relevant to recent debates in Anglo-analytic philosophy. In particular, (...)
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  14. Erratum To: Absence: An Indo-Analytic Inquiry.Anand Jayprakash Vaidya, Purushottama Bilimoria & Jaysankar L. Shaw - 2016 - Sophia 55 (4):515-515.
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  15.  7
    La Santa Muerte and Her Interventions in Human Affairs: A Theological Discussion.Stefano Bigliardi - 2016 - Sophia 55 (3):303-323.
    This article focuses upon the popular devotion for la Santa Muerte that emerged in Mexico and is gaining a rapid increase in notoriety in the country and abroad. The first sections reconstruct in detail its protean manifestations, as well as the interpretations contained in extant scholarly investigations, popular Mexican press and other texts. The final section, adopting a fine-grained, theological-epistemological viewpoint argues that la Santa’s interventions in human affairs, essential to explain her popularity, although usually described as ‘miracles’ can be (...)
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  16.  25
    Pantheism and Saving God.Andrei A. Buckareff - 2016 - Sophia 55 (3):347-355.
    In this paper, I examine Mark Johnston’s panentheistic account of the metaphysics of the divine developed in his recent book, Saving God: Religion After Idolatry. On Johnston’s account, God is the ‘Highest One’ and is identified with ‘the outpouring of Being by way of its exemplification in ordinary existents for the sake of the self-disclosure of Being’. Johnston eschews supernaturalism and takes his position to be consistent with what he calls ‘legitimate naturalism’ which he takes to be some version of (...)
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  17.  6
    From Emergence Theory to Panpsychism—A Philosophical Evaluation of Nancey Murphy’s Non-Reductive Physicalism.Mikael Leidenhag - 2016 - Sophia 55 (3):381-394.
    In this article, I offer a critical evaluation of non-reductive physicalism as articulated and defended by Nancey Murphy. I argue that the examples given by Murphy do not illustrate robust emergence and the philosophical idea of downward causation. The thesis of multiple realizability is ontologically neutral, and so cannot support the idea of the causal efficacy of higher-level properties. Supervenience is incompatible with strong emergence. I also argue for the fruitful relationship between emergence theory and panpsychism pertaining to the metaphysical (...)
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  18.  25
    The Difficulty with Demarcating Panentheism.R. T. Mullins - 2016 - Sophia 55 (3):325-346.
    In certain theological circles today, panentheism is all the rage. One of the most notorious difficulties with panentheism lies in figuring out what panentheism actually is. There have been several attempts in recent literature to demarcate panentheism from classical theism, neo-classical theism, open theism, and pantheism. I shall argue that these attempts to demarcate panentheism from these other positions fail. Then I shall offer my own demarcation.
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  19.  5
    Affirming God as Panentheistic and Embodied.David H. Nikkel - 2016 - Sophia 55 (3):291-302.
    In an anthology on panentheism, Keith Ward assesses the appropriateness of the metaphor of embodiment for God, as well as the viability of the concept of panentheism itself, as he considers the theologies of Ramanuja, Hegel, and process thought. Ward frames polar problems with respect to the analogy of self-body/God-world and to the concept of panentheism. Ramanuja and Hegel’s theologies ultimately deny the freedom and compromise the independence and otherness of the creatures. Process theology compromises divine sovereignty and perfection, making (...)
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  20. Review of G. Michael Zbaraschuk, The Purposes of God: Providence as Process-Historical Liberation. [REVIEW]Daniel J. Ott - 2016 - Sophia 55 (3):451-453.
  21.  4
    Shaftesbury, Stoicism, and Philosophy as a Way of Life.John Sellars - 2016 - Sophia 55 (3):395-408.
    This paper examines Shaftesbury’s reflections on the nature of philosophy in his Askêmata notebooks, which draw heavily on the Roman Stoics Epictetus and Marcus Aurelius. In what follows, I introduce the notebooks, outline Shaftesbury’s account of philosophy therein, compare it with his discussions of the nature of philosophy in his published works, and conclude by suggesting that Pierre Hadot’s conception of ‘philosophy as a way of life’ offers a helpful framework for thinking about Shaftesbury’s account of philosophy.
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  22.  4
    Socratic Ironies: Reading Hadot, Reading Kierkegaard.Matthew Sharpe - 2016 - Sophia 55 (3):409-435.
    This paper examines the seemingly unlikely rapport between the ‘Christian existentialist’, radically Protestant thinker, Søren Kierkegaard and French classicist and historian of philosophy, Pierre Hadot, famous for advocating a return to the ancient pagan sense of philosophy as a way of life. Despite decisive differences we stress in our concluding remarks, we argue that the conception of philosophy in Hadot as a way of life shares decisive features with Kierkegaard’s understanding of the true ‘religious’ life: as something demanding existential engagement (...)
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  23.  7
    Process Ecology: Making Room for Creation.E. Ulanowicz Robert - 2016 - Sophia 55 (3):357-380.
    The laws of physics, because they are cast in terms of homogeneous variables, fall short of determining outcomes in heterogeneous biological systems that are capable of an immense number of combinatoric changes. The universal laws are not violated and they continue to constrain, but specification of results is accomplished instead by stable configurations of processes that develop in a nonrandom, but indeterminate manner. The indeterminacy of physical laws puts an end to Deist speculations and necessitates an alternative to the mechanical-reductionistic (...)
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  24.  9
    Euthyphro and Moral Realism: A Reply to Harrison.Erik J. Wielenberg - 2016 - Sophia 55 (3):437-449.
    Gerald Harrison identifies two Euthyphro-related concerns for divine command theories and makes the case that to the extent that these concerns make trouble for divine command theories they also make trouble for non-naturalistic moral realism and naturalistic moral realism. He also offers responses to the two concerns on behalf of divine command theorists. I show here that the parity thesis does not hold for the most commonly discussed version of divine command theory. I further argue that his responses to the (...)
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  25.  14
    So What If Horses Would Draw Horse Gods?Scott F. Aikin - 2016 - Sophia 55 (2):163-177.
    Xenophanes famously noted that if horses could draw, they would draw their gods as horses. This connection between those who depict the gods and how the gods are depicted is posed as part of a critical theological program. What follows is an argumentative reconstruction of how these observations determine the extent and content of Xenophanes’ theological reforms. In light of the strength of the critical epistemic program, it is likely Xenophanes posed ambitious theological reforms.
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  26.  7
    Divine Immutability for Henotheists.Dirk Baltzly - 2016 - Sophia 55 (2):129-143.
    Discussions of divine immutability normally take place against the backdrop of a presupposition of monotheism. This background makes some problems seem especially salient—for instance, does the notion that God is immutable have any implications for God’s relation to time? In what follows, I’ll consider the problem of divine immutability in the context of henotheistic conceptions of god. I take henotheism to be the view that, although there are a plurality of gods, all of them are in some sense dependent upon (...)
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  27.  22
    Eternal Life as an Exclusively Present Possession: Perspectives From Theology and the Philosophy of Time.Mikel Burley - 2016 - Sophia 55 (2):145-161.
    Does it make sense to think of eternal life not as an unending continuation of life subsequent to death but as fully actualized in one’s present mortal and finite life? After outlining conceptual and moral reasons for being troubled by the notion of an endless life, this article draws upon the thought of major Christian theologians and philosophers of religion to expound the idea of eternal life as a possession exclusively of the life one is presently living. Supplementing the claims (...)
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  28.  2
    Lessons of Murdochian Attention.Christopher Cordner - 2016 - Sophia 55 (2):197-213.
    The idea of attention was brought back into mainstream philosophical thinking about ethics by Iris Murdoch, drawing on Simone Weil. While Murdoch’s use of the idea has been reflected on by a number of recent commentators, I think its deepest lessons have largely been missed. Beginning from a recurrent and revealing misreading of Murdoch on attention, a misreading often articulated through reflection on Murdoch’s example of M and D, I want to bring out some of those lessons. It is well-known (...)
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  29.  11
    Rawlsian Liberalism, Justice for the Worst Off, and the Limited Capacity of Political Institutions.Ben Cross - 2016 - Sophia 55 (2):215-236.
    This article argues that Rawlsian liberal political institutions are incapable of ensuring that the basic welfare needs of the worst off are met. This argument consists of two steps. First, I show that institutions are incapable of ensuring that the basic needs of the worst off are met without pursuing certain non-taxation-based courses of action that are designed to alter the work choices of citizens. Second, I argue that such actions are not permissible for Rawlsian institutions. It follows that a (...)
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  30.  36
    Anti-Theism and the Problem of Divine Hiddenness.Travis Dumsday - 2016 - Sophia 55 (2):179-195.
    While most discussions in natural theology focus on the existence and nature of God, recently the axiological implications of theism have been taken up by such authors as Kahane, Kraay and Dragos, Davis, McLean, Penner and Lougheed, and Penner. Rather than asking whether God exists, they ask whether God’s existence would be a good thing or a bad thing. That general question breaks down into more precise sub-questions, with a wide variety of possible positions resulting. Here, I argue that one (...)
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  31.  2
    Duty to God and Duty to Man: Jefferson on Religion, Natural and Sectarian.M. Andrew Holowchak - 2016 - Sophia 55 (2):237-261.
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  32. Review of Sadia Abbas, At Freedom’s Limit: Islam and the Postcolonial Predicament. [REVIEW]Carool Kersten - 2016 - Sophia 55 (2):277-279.
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  33.  7
    On the Infinite God Objection: A Reply to Jacobus Erasmus and Anné Hendrik Verhoef.Andrew Ter Ern Loke - 2016 - Sophia 55 (2):263-272.
    Erasmus and Verhoef suggest that a promising response to the infinite God objection to the Kalām cosmological argument include showing that abstract objects do not exist; actually infinite knowledge is impossible; and redefining omniscience as : for any proposition p, if God consciously thinks about p, God will either accept p as true if and only if p is true, or accept p as false if and only if p is false. I argue that there is insufficient motivation for showing (...)
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  34.  3
    Review of Marilynne Robinson, The Givenness of Things. [REVIEW]Reg Naulty - 2016 - Sophia 55 (2):285-286.
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  35. Review of Raimon Panikkar, Religion and Religions, Opera Omnia, Volume II. [REVIEW]Joshua Samuel - 2016 - Sophia 55 (2):281-283.
  36. Review of Migrating Texts & Traditions, Ed. By William Sweet. [REVIEW]Walter J. Schultz - 2016 - Sophia 55 (2):287-289.
  37.  1
    Review of Bindu Puri, The Tagore-Gandhi Debate on Matters of Truth and Untruth. [REVIEW]Richard Sorabji - 2016 - Sophia 55 (2):273-276.
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  38.  1
    The Language of Violence: Chiastic Encounters.Marguerite Caze - 2016 - Sophia 55 (1):115-127.
    In her recent book, Violence and the Philosophical Imaginary, Ann Murphy suggests that the philosophical imaginary, in particular that of contemporary continental philosophy, is imbued with images of violence. The concept of the philosophical imaginary is drawn from the work of Michèle Le Dœuff to explore the role of images of violence in philosophy. Murphy sets the language of violence, reflexivity, and critique against that of vulnerability, ambiguity and responsibility. Her concern is that images of violence have become and may (...)
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  39.  2
    Enacting the Violent Imaginary: Reflections on the Dynamics of Nonviolence and Violence in Buddhism.Leesa S. Davis - 2016 - Sophia 55 (1):15-30.
    In this paper, I explore the complex ethical dynamics of violence and nonviolence in Mahāyāna Buddhism by considering some of the historical precedents and scriptural prescriptions that inform modern and contemporary Buddhist acts of self-immolation. Through considering these scripturally sanctioned Mahāyāna ‘case studies,’ the paper traces the tension that exists in Buddhist thought between violence and nonviolence, outlines the interplay of key Mahāyāna ideas of transcendence and altruism, and comments on the mimetic status and influence of spiritually charged texts. It (...)
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  40.  7
    The Language of Violence: Chiastic Encounters.La Caze Marguerite - 2016 - Sophia 55 (1):115-127.
    In her recent book, Violence and the Philosophical Imaginary, Ann Murphy suggests that the philosophical imaginary, in particular that of contemporary continental philosophy, is imbued with images of violence. The concept of the philosophical imaginary is drawn from the work of Michèle Le Dœuff to explore the role of images of violence in philosophy. Murphy sets the language of violence, reflexivity, and critique against that of vulnerability, ambiguity and responsibility. Her concern is that images of violence have become and may (...)
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  41.  2
    Founding Foreclosures: Violence and Rhetorical Ownership in Philosophical Discourse on the Body.Ann Murphy - 2016 - Sophia 55 (1):5-14.
    Drawing inspiration from Susan Sontag’s notion of ‘rhetorical ownership’—applied not only to illness but also to the body more generally—this essay argues that philosophy, like medicine, has privileged a metaphorics of war and violence in its own discourses on embodiment. Drawing inspiration from Barbara Christian’s seminal essay ‘The Race for Theory,’ as well as literary theorist Eve Sedgwick’s account of what she calls ‘paranoid’ forms of inquiry in her book Touching Feeling, this essay explores the status of violence as an (...)
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  42. Keeping Secrets: Approaching Badiou’s Ontology Via Derrida’s Three Levels of Violence.Antonia Pont - 2016 - Sophia 55 (1):83-99.
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  43.  68
    Philosophy’s Shame: Reflections on an Ambivalent/Ambiviolent Relationship with Science.Jack Reynolds - 2016 - Sophia 55 (1):55-70.
    In this paper, I take inspiration from some themes in Ann Murphy’s recent book, Violence and the Philosophical Imaginary, especially her argument that philosophy’s identity and relation to itself depends on an intimate relationship with that which is designated as not itself, the latter of which is a potential source of shame that calls for some form of response. I argue that this shame is particularly acute in regard to the natural sciences, which have gone on in various ways to (...)
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  44.  45
    Philosophy, Violence, Metaphor.Jack Reynolds, Leesa Davis & Matthew Sharpe - 2016 - Sophia 55 (1):1-4.
  45.  2
    There Is Not Just a War: Recalling the Therapeutic Metaphor in Western Metaphilosophy.Matthew Sharpe - 2016 - Sophia 55 (1):31-54.
    This paper offers a critical response to the claims of Sivin and Lloyd and Mattice to the effect that Greek and Roman philosophy was characterised by a predominance of combat metaphors. Drawing on Plato and Plutarch, as well as contemporary studies led by Nussbaum, I argue that a host of different metaphors was demonstrably used in the Greek tradition to describe philosophy and its subjects, led by the therapeutic or medicinal metaphor of philosophy as ‘therapy of desire’ or of desiderative (...)
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  46.  1
    The Guillotine as an Aesthetic Idol and Kant’s Loathing.Valerijs Vinogradovs - 2016 - Sophia 55 (1):101-113.
    Kant’s doctrine of aesthetic ideas, along with his brief treatment of ugliness, has been the focus of some recent literature. In this paper, I employ an original approach, which nonetheless draws from Kant’s oeuvre, to pin down the phenomenological complexity of a spectacular event that took place at the inception of the French Terror—the decapitation of Louis the XVI. To this end, the first section of the essay fleshes out an interpretative framework explicating how seeing the guillotine as an aesthetic (...)
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  47.  3
    Do No Harm: The Extended Mind Model and the Problem of Delayed Damage.James Williams - 2016 - Sophia 55 (1):71-82.
    I argue in this essay that there can be harm due to philosophy that is not directly expressed in violent imagery. The harm is instead a concealed and delayed detrimental effect of an assumption of non-violence in a working model, defined as a picture of a field of enquiry and the methods required to approach it. Theses for the extended mind, as developed by Andy Clark and others, lead to a form of harm that follows from the models they work (...)
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