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  1.  8
    God and suffering in Africa: An exploration in natural theology and philosophy of religion.Patrick O. Aleke - 2023 - South African Journal of Philosophy 42 (4):348-360.
    (2023). God and suffering in Africa: An exploration in natural theology and philosophy of religion. South African Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 42, No. 4, pp. 348-360.
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  2.  14
    The relevance of first-generation Critical Theory in the digital era of new social media.Mark Jacob Amiradakis - 2023 - South African Journal of Philosophy 42 (4):270-286.
    Is the first generation of Critical Theory still relevant to an analysis of the technocentric nature of contemporary society – particularly its digitally based mediums of interaction and communication? This paper will argue that it is. This will be achieved by examining the interdisciplinary methodological framework that guides Critical Theory. This approach offers the researcher fruitful insight. It allows for a broad, yet heuristically rich understanding of society which can extend to the technological and digital domains of the 21st century. (...)
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  3.  11
    The fourth ecology: Hikikomori, depressive hedonia and algorithmic ubiquity.Chantelle Gray & Aragorn Eloff - 2023 - South African Journal of Philosophy 42 (4):301-314.
    In this article we expand upon the conceptual framework of Félix Guattari’s 1989 essay, The Three Ecologies. Here Guattari examines changes in subjectivity that have come about due to scientific and technological advances which, as he sees it, brought about an “ecological disequilibrium” ([1989]2000, 27) and deteriorated individual and collective modes of being. In response to this Guattari proposes a kind of holistic therapy or ‘ecosophy’ between three ecological registers: “the environment, social relations and human subjectivity” (ibid., 28). Guattari cautions (...)
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  4.  7
    Knowledge work compulsion: The neoliberal mediation of working existence in the network society.A. B. Hofmeyr - 2023 - South African Journal of Philosophy 42 (4):287-300.
    This contribution seeks to understand the pervasive phenomenon of work compulsion among knowledge workers in our present network society. Knowledge workers not only have to work all the time from anywhere, but they also appear to want to. This study argues that this curious phenomenon may be attributed to the thumotic satisfaction that knowledge work generates. What is more, the neoliberal theory of human capital has found a way to harness thumotic satisfaction to the profit incentive, and has created arguably (...)
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  5.  6
    Would a transhuman be free, determined or both? The metaphysical aspect of the Botho perspective.Doreen Sesiro - 2023 - South African Journal of Philosophy 42 (4):361-371.
    This paper explores the consequences of transhumanism on free will based on the metaphysical aspect of the Botho perspective. Botho is an indigenous philosophy, prominent in Botswana, that expresses the essence of being a person. A human person from the Botho metaphysical point of view embodies material and immaterial aspects. This study seeks to answer the question: “Would certain transhuman changes to the material body affect the human person’s ability to judge and choose and hence the capacity for free will?” (...)
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  6.  2
    Can gangs be a source of ubuntu in prison?S. A. Shabangu - 2023 - South African Journal of Philosophy 42 (4):328-337.
    This paper considers the African communal ethic of Ubuntu as it is understood in the South African context. Its background and context and the various interpretations of this lived ethic in society and academia will be explored. According to Ubuntu, what is good is constituted by how one relates to others (affirming others, empathising, etc.). It is not an ethic that is purely governed by laws and the outcomes of actions. This paper considers the detrimental effect of gangsterism on prisoners’ (...)
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  7.  44
    ‘Blessed are the breadmakers...’: Sociophobia, digital society and the enduring relevance of technological determinism.Gregory Morgan Swer - 2023 - South African Journal of Philosophy 42 (4):315-327.
    Technological determinism, as a position on the nature and effects of technology/technologies can be divided into optimistic and critical forms. The optimistic variety, of which contemporary cyber-utopianism is an instance, holds that the development of technology shapes or at least facilitates ameliorative alterations in society. The critical variety, on the other hand, tends to problematise or condemn the positive narrative of technological impact on human existence. Whilst the optimistic form still retains some academic credibility, especially concerning digital technologies, the critical (...)
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  8.  4
    On the fundamental incompatibility between wildlife conservation and animal ethics.Carla Turner - 2023 - South African Journal of Philosophy 42 (4):261-269.
    Wildlife conservation aims to protect the natural world, plant and animal species, and the habitats they form part of and rely on for survival. More particularly, it focuses on species that are considered important, be it from economic, ecological and other perspectives, and preventing harm to these species. While conservation activities, based on common conservation values such as species fitness and biodiversity, are no doubt beneficial to animals in general, there seems to be a fundamental disjoint between this approach and (...)
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  9.  7
    Existence as first philosophy.Darryl Wardle - 2023 - South African Journal of Philosophy 42 (4):338-347.
    The philosophical contemplation of “first philosophy” is as old as Western philosophy itself, and yet “first philosophy” is often eschewed in contemporary philosophical thought. This is because attempts at arriving at a first philosophy have often been steeped in metaphysical thinking that aims at non-finite foundations as the constitutive ground of human reality. However, in our contemporary world in which metaphysical postulates render themselves increasingly outmoded and immaterial, can we still speak of first philosophy today? This is to ask whether (...)
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  10.  16
    Gender relations and social justice in Africa: Toward a duty-based approach to gender-based violence.Abiodun Paul Afolabi & Edwin Etieyibo - 2023 - South African Journal of Philosophy 42 (3):230-245.
    A large and important part of social relations is gender relations between men and women. Over time, the manifestation of such relations has often been one of violence, particularly violence against women. Different approaches have been deployed to deal with the experience of gender-based violence (GBV). One popular approach is the human rights framework that suggest that GBV can be addressed by granting certain rights to women. We argue that while a human rights framework holds some promise in resolving GBV, (...)
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  11.  10
    Indigenous culture and the decolonisation of feminist thought in Africa.Aderonke Ajiboro & Edwin Etieyibo - 2023 - South African Journal of Philosophy 42 (3):165-175.
    The existence of current feminist thought in Africa is tainted by colonialism. Colonial and postcolonial anthropological thought and Eurocentric scholarship have misrepresented Africa as a society where social and gender roles were largely lopsided. Hence, current feminist thought (which are largely Western) on oppression of women, subjugation and suppression were imposed on the historicity of Africans. In this article, we argue that the misrepresentations of feminism of the indigenous societal order in Africa should be ignored. We bring to the fore (...)
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  12.  13
    The cultural distortion of the African world view and the subordination of women in ‘postcolonial’ African societies.Ebbah Dube - 2023 - South African Journal of Philosophy 42 (3):192-201.
    The purpose of this article is to bring to light a critical question which borders around the decolonial feminism discourse, and in so doing I unveil some salient insights which add valuable contributions to the discourse about the place of feminism in the African context. The motivating problem is the question of subordination of women in Africa. There are many reasons and questions, each deserving thorough examination that have been brought forward for the causes and possible explanations of the phenomenon. (...)
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  13.  14
    Igbo values and women.Onyinye Patricia Emua & Edwin Etieyibo - 2023 - South African Journal of Philosophy 42 (3):202-216.
    This article discusses some of the core values among the Igbos. This is done partly as a way of showing the way in which these values play out both in gender relations in and highlighting the way women are viewed. In this sense, our attempt here should be understood as an investigation. The values that we examine are those of truthfulness or truth, respect or respectfulness and industry or industriousness or hard work. The aim is to help make the case (...)
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  14.  13
    Feminism and women in African philosophy.Edwin Etieyibo & Pedro Tabensky - 2023 - South African Journal of Philosophy 42 (3):161-164.
    In this preamble, we highlight some of the more recent work on gender and sexuality in African philosophy. We do this as a way of introducing the special issue on “African Philosophy, Women, and Feminism”. In particular, we outline and highlight the trajectory and intellectual landscape of several discussions on women and feminism in African philosophy in the issue, and in this way, build on some previous work on gender, women, sexuality and African philosophy.
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  15.  17
    Non-binary gender in African personhood?Julia Huysamer & Louise du Toit - 2023 - South African Journal of Philosophy 42 (3):246-260.
    A case has been made by various authors that the normative and processual notion of personhood found in African philosophy is discriminatory: it has been labelled as sexist, ableist and anti-queer. Within the anti-queer critique, one area that has not been specifically addressed in the literature is whether this notion of personhood is biased against people who identify as non-binary with respect to gender. This includes people who are gender fluid and gender neutral, among others. In this article, we argue (...)
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  16.  17
    Understanding gender identities in an African communitarian world view.Vitumbiko Nyirenda & Simphiwe Sesanti - 2023 - South African Journal of Philosophy 42 (3):176-191.
    In African philosophical literature, and especially in Afro-communitarianism, there are discussions about the value of the relationship an individual has with her respective community. By community, reference is made to the metaphysical holistic view of community which includes all beings in nature. But since the article deals with gender, which is a social construction, most of the arguments appeal to a narrower version of community, that of human beings. Therefore, discussions about “value” refer to the value that is given to (...)
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  17.  9
    bell hooks’ feminist, and ancient Egypt’s philosophy of education for an enabling Afrocentric education.Simphiwe Sesanti - 2023 - South African Journal of Philosophy 42 (3):217-229.
    In 2021, bell hooks, an African-American anti-colonial education and feminist educator, passed on. hooks’ passing coincided with the 40th publication anniversary of her book, Ain’t I a woman: Black Women and Feminism. Her passing, and her book’s 40th anniversary, present opportunities for reflecting on her ideas about education as an instrument of freedom in a world where racists and sexists historically used education as an instrument of oppression. It is important to examine hooks’ work in South Africa considering that the (...)
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  18. The post-death question in African metaphysics: Engaging Attoe on death and life’s meaning.Tosin Adeate - 2023 - South African Journal of Philosophy 42 (2):89-97.
    Aribiah Attoe took issue with the materialist and the non-materialist African conceptions of death by arguing that the reality of death puts pressure on the human conception of life’s meaning. He admits the reality of an afterlife experience through a causal principle that sees events in the world as the product of interactions between predetermined past events. It is an afterlife where a decomposing body continues interacting with other things in the world, not an afterlife involving consciousness. While conscious meaning-making (...)
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  19.  8
    Decolonising philosophical analysis: In defence of “ethnolysis”.Babalola Joseph Balogun - 2023 - South African Journal of Philosophy 42 (2):144-159.
    Analysis has always been a core part of humanistic studies. In the domain of philosophical research, where it has assumed a larger-than-life status in the analytic tradition, analysis is a methodological device for conceptual clarification, the unpacking of loaded terms and expressions, and the achievement of overall understanding in every sphere of philosophical discourse. Scholars have expressed doubt about whether reductive analysis is an attractive methodological framework for African philosophy. In a recent article, Balogun raises the need for African philosophy (...)
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  20.  18
    Folk psychology without metaphysics: An expressivist approach.Víctor Fernández Castro - 2023 - South African Journal of Philosophy 42 (2):128-143.
    In recent years, there has been a renewed concern about the dangers of eliminative materialism, as well as several attempts to discuss alternative positions such as new versions of interpretivism or fictionalism. Although expressivism has also emerged as a possibility, the problems with hybrid versions of expressivism in applying it to attitude ascriptions have led to a strong rejection of the proposal. The aim of this article is twofold. First, it argues that there are still theoretical tools available to defend (...)
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  21.  13
    Scepticism in African philosophy: A conversation with Jonathan Chimakonam on the notion of “arumaristics”.Maduka Enyimba - 2023 - South African Journal of Philosophy 42 (2):98-107.
    The significance of scepticism for philosophical inquiry appears to have been well articulated by epistemologists in diverse forms, but none to the best of my knowledge has shown its place and significance in African (epistemology) philosophy. In this article, I engage Jonathan O. Chimakonam on his notion of “arumaristics” and unveil its sceptical nature by showing that conversationalism or conversational thinking promotes scepticism in African philosophy since it requires the suspension of judgement. The problem is that Chimakonam did not explicitly (...)
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  22. Astral legal justice: Between law’s poetry and justice’s dance.Joshua M. Hall - 2023 - South African Journal of Philosophy 42 (2):108-116.
    In this article, I build on my recent conceptions of law as poetry and of justice as dance by articulating three new conceptions of the relationship between law and justice. In the first, “poetry-based justice”, justice consists of a rigid choreography to a kind of musical recitation of the law’s poetry. In the second, “dancing-based law”, justice consists of spontaneous, freely improvised movement patterns that the poetry of the law tries to capture in a kind of musical notation. And in (...)
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  23.  13
    Regrettable experiences and the affirmation of life.Roger G. López - 2023 - South African Journal of Philosophy 42 (2):75-88.
    My theme in this essay is the relation of misfortune – and other occasions for regret – to the affirmation of life. R. Jay Wallace believes there is an antagonistic relation that produces a schism between our affirmative attitudes and our reasons and considered judgments. On his view, our attachments to the persons and projects that give meaning to our lives lead us to affirm states of affairs it would be more appropriate to regret. I argue that the attitude of (...)
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  24. Knowledge and society: A comprehensive approach to social epistemology.Chrysogonus M. Okwenna - 2023 - South African Journal of Philosophy 42 (2):117-127.
    This article proposes an alternative approach to social epistemology – a comprehensive approach. It argues that the dominant approaches to social epistemology, which it identifies as communitarian and veritistic, are inadequate. It observes that the nature of the emphasis that the communitarian approach places on the epistemic community foster mindless tolerance in epistemology, which makes the pursuit of the cognitive goal of truth difficult to attain. It also observes that the veritistic approach that seeks to refocus social epistemology on the (...)
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  25.  22
    Predeterminism as a category error: Why Aribiah Attoe got it wrong.Patrick Effiong Ben - 2023 - South African Journal of Philosophy 42 (1):13-23.
    I aim to establish in this article why Aribiah Attoe, like other determinists before him, got it wrong in arguing for the possibility of predeterminism in a materially evolving universe. I will do this by proving two things: I will first establish the inconsistency of the idea of predeterminism in an evolving universe. Then, I argue that the adirectionality presupposed by an evolutionary universe gives room for free will and negates the argument for a predeterministic universe. I aim to achieve (...)
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  26.  26
    Privilege: A critical inquiry.Chaitanya Joshi & Sushruth Ravish - 2023 - South African Journal of Philosophy 42 (1):63-73.
    The word “privilege” has become a part of our everyday conversations. However, it is not evident whether the various interlocutors in discussions on privilege are using it in the same sense. While different instances of privilege like white, male, or caste privilege have been discussed in contemporary academic discourses, we believe there is a lack of clarity regarding the notion of privilege. We critically analyse existing accounts of privilege to show that they leave some room for improvement. We offer an (...)
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  27.  15
    Life, death and commodification: Fear of death in the work of Adam Smith.Mark Rathbone - 2023 - South African Journal of Philosophy 42 (1):37-50.
    The purpose of this article is to analyse Adam Smith’s view of death in The Theory of Moral Sentiments for commercial society to determine whether the current commodification of goods (e.g. pharmaceuticals) and services (e.g. cryogenics) to assist people to deal with the fear of death was what Smith envisioned for meaningful existence and to find out what he proposed as a means to manage the fear of death in existence. The investigation revealed that Smith’s book contains many references to (...)
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  28.  13
    On thinking about interpersonal violence and the impotence of force.Charla Smith & Louise du Toit - 2023 - South African Journal of Philosophy 42 (1):24-36.
    We argue that the problem of violence persists, to a certain degree, because of our refusal or inability to think about traumatic, difficult or “senseless” material systematically. We explore the connection between thinking and violence, and specifically Arendt’s question whether thinking can make men abstain from violence. We are interested in the relationship and tension between knowing and not knowing – as products of thinking – in relation to (also our own capacities for) violence. The tension presents in two main (...)
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  29.  16
    Are Igbo (African) thoughts on death Heideggerian? Some critical insights.Donald Mark C. Ude - 2023 - South African Journal of Philosophy 42 (1):1-12.
    This article primarily sets out to investigate whether Igbo (African) thoughts on death might be considered Heideggerian or not. It does so by analysing and juxtaposing five key elements of Heidegger’s existentialist analysis of Dasein’s death with some important features of Igbo (African) thoughts on death. This is aimed at challenging an identifiable attempt by scholars like Chukwuelobe and Onwuanibe to couch the Igbo metaphysics of death in Heideggerian terms. Therefore, the main argument of the article is that the important (...)
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  30.  16
    Divine violence as non-violent violence: A critique of Judith Butler.Hayden Weaver - 2023 - South African Journal of Philosophy 42 (1):51-62.
    The question of violence and how society can emancipate oneself from it has occupied many philosophers. Walter Benjamin attempted to answer this question in 1920 through the notion of divine violence. This idea has recently been resurrected by philosophers such as Jacques Derrida, Jürgen Habermas, Slavoj Žižek and Judith Butler. Divine violence is turned to as a means of emancipating society from systemic oppression and coercive law. However, it is a notion that has been met by major critiques. Most notable (...)
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