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  1.  48
    The Epistemology of Justice.Elizabeth Anderson - 2020 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 58 (1):6-29.
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  2.  99
    Morally Respectful Listening and its Epistemic Consequences.Galen Barry - 2020 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 58 (1):52-76.
  3.  7
    Navigating the Penumbra: Children and Moral Responsibility.Michael D. Burroughs - 2020 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 58 (1):77-101.
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  4.  1
    Editor’s Introduction.Remy Debes - 2020 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 58 (1):5-5.
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  5.  3
    Injustice in the Spaces Between Concepts.Fran Fairbairn - 2020 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 58 (1):102-136.
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  6.  2
    The Sense and Sensibility of Equality.Chris Lebron - 2020 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 58 (1):30-51.
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  7.  5
    Testimonial Injustice and a Case for Mindful Epistemology.Keya Maitra - 2020 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 58 (1):137-160.
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  8. “What If There's Something Wrong with Her?”‐How Biomedical Technologies Contribute to Epistemic Injustice in Healthcare.Joel Michael Reynolds - 2020 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 58 (1):161-185.
    While there is a steadily growing literature on epistemic injustice in healthcare, there are few discussions of the role that biomedical technologies play in harming patients in their capacity as knowers. Through an analysis of newborn and pediatric genetic and genomic sequencing technologies (GSTs), I argue that biomedical technologies can lead to epistemic injustice through two primary pathways: epistemic capture and value partitioning. I close by discussing the larger ethical and political context of critical analyses of GSTs and their broader (...)
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  9.  2
    A Right to Understand Injustice: Epistemology and the “Right to the Truth” in International Human Rights Discourse.Ian Werkheiser - 2020 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 58 (1):186-199.
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