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  1.  3
    Sharpening Our Tools for Moral Inquiry.Karl Aho - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (2):23-26.
    This paper is a response to Justin Bell's “Depression Applied to Moral Imagination: Deweyan Tools for Moral Inquiry." The author first contextualizes Bell’s use of evolutionary psychology in the context of two influential philosophical engagements with medicine: Alasdair MacIntyre’s concept of the therapeutic and the recent turn towards person-centered medicine over disease-centered medicine. He then raises two concerns about the accounts of depression used in the sources Bell draws on: the way they identify depression as oriented towards social problems and (...)
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  2.  5
    Finding a Right Price.Dave Beisecker - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (2):67-71.
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  3.  26
    Whose Metaethical Minimalism?Noell Birondo - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (2):37-43.
    T. M. Scanlon’s ‘Reasons Fundamentalism’ rejects any naturalistic reduction of normative truths and it also rejects the type of non-naturalism that invokes a ‘special metaphysical reality.’ Here I argue that this still does not commit Scanlon—as some have thought—to an extreme ‘metaethical minimalism’ according to which there are no ‘truth makers’ at all for normative truths. I emphasize that the issue here is not just about understanding Scanlon, since the actual position defended by Scanlon might, more significantly, point the way (...)
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  4.  3
    Moral Motivation and Epistemic Virtue.Chelsea Bowden - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (2):27-31.
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  5.  2
    A Commentary on “Human Plurality as Object: An Arendtian Framework for Making Sense of Trump”.Nathan L. Cartagena - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (2):9-12.
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  6.  1
    Why Ever Doubt First-Person Testimony About Disability?Susan V. H. Castro - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (2):49-54.
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  7.  7
    Always Choose to Live or Choose to Always Live?Daniel Coren - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (2):89-104.
    Bernard Williams (1973) famously argued that if given the choice to relinquish our mortality we should refuse. We should not choose to always live. His piece provoked an entire literature on the desirability of immortality. Intending to contradict Williams, Thomas Nagel claimed that if given the choice between living for a week and dying in five minutes he would always choose to live. I argue that (1) Nagel’s iterating scenario is closer to the original Makropulos case (Čapek’s) that inspired Williams’s (...)
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  8. Commentary on Fischer’s and Wiegman’s “The Disassociation Intuition”.Matthew Z. Donnelly - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (2):17-21.
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  9.  1
    Maybe We Should Take Human Rights Seriously.Jerry Green - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (2):13-16.
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  10.  1
    Commentary on Peter Westmoreland’s “Act Like a Right-Hander: Right Hand Bias in Norms of Proximate Space Inhabitation”.Mary Gwin - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (2):55-58.
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  11. Reply to Justin Remhof.Fiacha Heneghan - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (2):59-61.
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  12.  1
    Hegel and the Habit of Language: Theme and Variation.Julie Kuhlken - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (2):63-66.
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  13. Limits for Genuinely Understanding.Allysson Vasconcelos Lima Rocha - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (2):1-4.
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  14. What Are Spinoza’s Inadequate Ideas Of?Eugene Marshall - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (2):105-116.
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  15.  1
    Reexamining Kierkegaard, Hegel, and Taylor.Paul Martens - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (2):83-87.
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  16. Comments on Bromhall.Jonathan McKinney - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (2):33-35.
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  17.  1
    On Kenneth L. Brewer’s “There Will Be Monsters: A Defense of Noël Carroll’s Defi Nition of the Horror Genre”.James Mock - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (2):79-81.
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  18.  4
    Reconceptualizing Species as Species-Towards-Extinction.Matt Rosen - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (2):117-123.
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  19. Comments on Dadlez’s “Kitsch and Bullshit as Aesthetic and Epistemic Transgressions”.Landon W. Schurtz - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (2):5-8.
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  20. Comments on “Nonfunctional Semantics in Plant Signaling” by Mark Bauer.Mark Silcox - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (2):73-77.
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  21. Comments on Morton’s “A Dilemma for Streetian Constructivism”.Todd M. Stewart - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (2):45-48.
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  22.  3
    Human Plurality as Object.David Antonini - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (1):69-76.
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  23.  6
    Nonfunctional Semantics in Plant Signaling.Mark Bauer - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (1):199-208.
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  24.  7
    Depression Applied to Moral Imagination.Justin Bell - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (1):93-101.
    Based upon research done by evolutionary psychologists into the reason why human beings feel depression in social situations, I argue that philosophers have significant warrant to consider depression as an important feature conditioning moral imagination. The moral imagination come up with new enterprises and new ways of organizing social life. This reorganization would meet many of the goals put forth by pragmatist philosopher John Dewey. I argue that depression will work as a leading clue and unique imaginative “space” to reconstruct (...)
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  25.  5
    There Will Be Monsters.Kenneth L. Brewer - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (1):209-215.
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  26.  6
    Do Minds Change? Calkins's Self-Psychology and the Epistemology of Disagreement.Kyle Bromhall - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (1):117-124.
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  27.  3
    On the Valuing and Re-Valuing of Socratic Parrhesia.R. Bensen Cain - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (1):17-21.
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  28.  4
    On the Inconsistency of Naturalism and Global Expressivism.Thomas Dabay - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (1):189-197.
    Price defends a form of global expressivism that aspires to be both naturalistic and thoroughly anti-representational. I argue that although Price achieves the latter aspiration, his minimalist treatment of semantic notions prevents his global expressivism from being genuinely naturalistic. To do this, I propose two demands that any view must meet in order to be considered naturalistic—a Deflationary Demand and an Objectivity Demand—and show how the indexical nature of Price’s use of disquotational schemata prevents him from meeting the Objectivity Demand. (...)
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  29.  4
    Kitsch and Bullshit as Cases of Aesthetic and Epistemic Transgression.E. M. Dadlez - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (1):59-67.
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  30.  47
    Three Problems with Metaethical Minimalism.Raff Donelson - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (1):125-131.
    Metaethical minimalism. sometimes called quietism, is the view that first-order moral judgments can be true but nothing makes them true. This article raises three worries for that view. First, minimalists have no good reason to insist that moral judgments can be true. Second, minimalism, in abandoning the requirement that true judgments need to have truthmakers, leads to a problematic proliferation of truths. Third, most versions of minimalism entail a disjointed and therefore unacceptable theory of language and thought.
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  31.  10
    Disassociation Intuitions.Bob Fischer & Isaac Wiegman - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (1):85-92.
    We should disassociate ourselves from wrongdoing. If Hobby Lobby is against LGBTQ rights, we shouldn’t shop there. If Old Navy sources their clothing from sweatshops, we shouldn’t buy them. If animals are treated terribly in factory farms, we shouldn’t eat the meat, eggs, and dairy products that come from them. Let’s call these disassociation intuitions. What explains the existence and force of disassociation intuitions? And based on that explanation, are they intuitions worth taking seriously? In other words, depending on the (...)
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  32.  2
    Self-Forgiveness in the Moral Domain.Robyn R. Gaier - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (1):31-47.
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  33.  15
    Don’T Be Ignorant.Deborah K. Heikes - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (1):49-57.
    “Ignorance” is receiving an increased amount of philosophical attention. The study of it even has its own name, “agnotology.” Some ignorance remains simply a case of not having enough information, but increasingly philosophers are recognizing a whole other type of ignorance, one that is socially constructed and often actively promoted. In the first section of this paper I examine perhaps the best known type of socially constructed ignorance, “white ignorance.” White ignorance reflects a lack of genuine understanding of the social (...)
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  34.  3
    An Epistemic-Virtue Solution to Some Peer Disagreements in Philosophy.Thomas Metcalf - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (1):103-116.
    I present a new way to resolve some peer disagreements in philosophy. While a straightforward majority-based argument would be inconclusive, I show that some philosophical majorities are special cases. I focus on the example of moral realism. First, I discuss how mathematically, small variations in our justified confidence in some particular cognizer’s judgment entail large differences in our justified confidence in the decision of a populous voting bloc comprising such cognizers. Second, I argue that plausible considerations about epistemic and moral (...)
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  35.  16
    A Dilemma for Streetian Constructivism.Justin Morton - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (1):133-140.
    In this paper, I pose a dilemma for a very influential kind of metaethical constructivism, advocated recently by Sharon Street. It is either true or false that, if an action is morally wrong for a certain agent, then that agent has a normative reason not to do it. If it is true, then the constructivist is committed to the counterintuitive claim that some apparently morally horrendous acts are not actually wrong. If it is false, then the constructivist cannot maintain a (...)
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  36.  7
    We Should Not Take Human Rights So Seriously.Dustin Nelson - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (1):77-84.
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  37.  3
    Mechanical Memory and the Speculative Sentence.Peter R. Nennig - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (1):181-188.
    In this paper examine the relation between the account of mechanical memory in Hegel’s Encyclopedia of the Philosophical Sciences and the speculative sentence in his Phenomenology of Spirit. Both accounts involve a transition to speculative thinking, a kind of thinking that is free from given images and representations. By discussing them together I hope to illuminate how speculative thinking functions for Hegel and why it is important. Specifically, I try to show how what Hegel calls mechanical memory can shed light (...)
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  38.  65
    A World Without a Past: New Challenges to Kant's Refutation of Idealism.Justin Remhof - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (1):171-180.
    In the Refutation of Idealism, Kant aims to defeat the Cartesian radical skeptical hypothesis that empirical reality might not exist and we cannot have knowledge of it. Kant intends to demonstrate that conscious experience presupposes direct experience of empirical reality. This paper presents new challenges to the conclusions Kant reaches in the Refutation. Kant’s argument turns on the claim that the past must exist, and my challenges concern the possibility that there is no past.
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  39.  2
    Kierkegaard, Charles Taylor, and Narrative Sources of Identity.Andrew D. Rose - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (1):225-234.
    This essay is an attempt to demonstrate that Charles Taylor’s “social imaginaries” should not be viewed as sources of identity. For Taylor, making sense of society’s practices allows an individual to develop a conception of the self – an idea Taylor borrows from Hegel. I therefore suggest that Kierkegaard’s critiques against Hegel may similarly be used against Taylor’s conception of identity. Kierkegaard’s critiques of Hegel are applicable to Taylor’s social imaginaries for two reasons. First, Hegel’s system only provides approximations—mediation in (...)
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  40.  7
    Stirring Up America’s Sleeping Horses.Anne-Marie Schulz - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (1):1-16.
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  41.  18
    Dewey’s Institutions of Aesthetic Experience.Joseph Swenson - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (1):217-224.
    I argue that John Dewey’s account of aesthetic experience offers a contextual approach to aesthetic experience that could benefit contemporary contextual definitions of art. It is well known that many philosophers who employ contextual definitions of art (most notably, George Dickie) also argue that traditional conceptions of aesthetic experience are obsolete because they fail to distinguish art from non-art when confronted with hard cases like Marcel Duchamp’s Fountain. While questions of perceptual indiscernibility are a problem for many traditional theories of (...)
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  42.  5
    Socratic Oblivion and the Siren Songs of Academe: Responding to Anne-Marie Schultz's "Stirring Up America's Sleeping Horses".Terrell Taylor & Glenn Trujillo - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (1):23-30.
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  43.  3
    What Race Terms Do: Du Bois, Biology, and Psychology on the Meanings of "Race".Glenn Trujillo - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (1):235-247.
    This paper does two things. First, it interprets the work of W. E. B. Du Bois to reveal that the meanings of race terms are grounded by both a historical and an aspirational component. Race terms refer to a backward-looking component that traces the history of the group to its present time, as well as a forward-looking component that sets out values and goals for the group. Race terms thus refer to a complex cluster of concepts that involve biological, sociological, (...)
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  44.  3
    Act Like a Right-Hander.Peter Westmoreland - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (1):153-169.
    90% of human beings are right-handed. Naturally, the human world is dexterocentric, or designed for encounter with the right hand. Moments of this right hand bias are widely recognized, and, through devices such as left-handed scissors, coffee mugs, and wooden spoons, non-right-handers fi nd accommodation. From the perspective of one-off accommodations, however, the extent of right hand bias is unclear. This paper offers a unifying framework for understanding right hand bias. It focuses not on which hand is used, but on (...)
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  45.  12
    Disability and First-Person Testimony.Hilary Yancey - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (1):141-151.
    It is widely agreed that first-person testimony is a good source of evidence, including testimony about the contents of mental states unobservable to others. Thus we generally think that an individual’s testimony is a good source of evidence about her wellbeing—after all, she experiences her quality of life and we don’t. However, some have argued that the first-person testimony of disabled individuals regarding their wellbeing is defeated: regardless of someone’s claim about how disability affects her overall wellbeing, other evidence about (...)
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