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  1. The Intrinsic Wrongness of Trash Talking and How It Diminishes the Practice of Sport: Reply to Kershnar.Nicholas Dixon - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (2):211-225.
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  2. Henning Eichberg.Andrew Edgar - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (2):115-116.
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  3. For Ownership Theory: A Response to Nicholas Dixon.Stephen Kershnar - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (2):226-235.
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  4.  7
    Sport for the Sake of the Soul.Michael W. Austin - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (1):20-29.
    The relationship between Christianity and sport is a long and varied one. Christian thinkers, past and present, have been highly critical of sport, for a variety of reasons. Others have been much more positive, and extol the virtues of sport. In this paper, I argue that sport is a context in which the Christian theological virtues of faith, hope, and love can be cultivated and displayed. One significant worry about this claim is that using sport to cultivate these theological virtues, (...)
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  5.  6
    Game Spirituality: How Games Tell Us More Than We Might Think.Chad Carlson - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (1):81-93.
    While we often see games as less serious or at least less transcendental than religion there is reason to believe that games can evoke similarly meaningful narratives that allow us to learn a great deal about ourselves and our world. And games do so often using the same symbolic and metaphorical mechanisms that generate meaning in religious experience. In this paper, I explore some of the ways in which game myths—the myths created from and through games—generate meaning in our lives. (...)
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  6.  3
    Love Your Opponent as Yourself: A Christian Ethic for Sport.Shawn Graves - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (1):50-69.
    In this paper, we’ll present, explain, and defend a Christian ethic for sport that takes loving all individuals as the fundamental moral imperative. First, we’ll begin by taking a seeming detour through views about the morality of war. More specifically, we’ll consider realism, according to which, roughly, moral requirements and rules are suspended during war such that it is misguided to attempt to apply moral terms to acts performed within the context of war. Second, by paying attention to relevant surveys (...)
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  7.  1
    Christian Instrumentality of Sport as a Possible Source of Goodness for Atheists.Ivo Jirásek - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (1):30-49.
    The aim of this paper is to differentiate between religion and spirituality more strictly, or, specifically, between the religious and spiritual aspects of sport. The text is written in an autoethnographic genre from an ‘outsider’ position, by an author who is not Christian. Religion, including Christianity, represents a connectedness between the natural world and an ontologically different reality and its transcendence towards the sacrum. But spirituality is the centre of the human way of being and a manifestation of personality. So (...)
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  8.  4
    Chesterton on Play, Work, Paradox, and Christian Orthodoxy.Scott Kretchmar & Nick J. Watson - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (1):70-80.
    In this essay we attempt to accomplish two things related to the work of G.K. Chesterton. The first is to use one of his favorite ploys to articulate the nature of play. We discuss several paradoxical characteristics of play and attempt to show how seemingly contradictory features actually help us to understand play’s allure and other values. We introduce the second topic of theological analyses of work and play with a review of the Christian literature on these subjects. We then (...)
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  9.  4
    A Special Issue on Sport and Spirituality.Scott Kretchmar & John White - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (1):1-3.
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  10.  3
    Hope & Kinesiology: The Hopelessness of Health-Centered Kinesiology.Gregg Twietmeyer - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (1):4-19.
    Hope is necessary for kinesiology. Hope is profoundly human, because it is a fact of our nature. Human life is organic. We hope because we are by nature oriented to the future. Motion, growth, development and temporality are at the core of our lives. The great Thomistic philosopher Josef Pieper puts it this way: ‘man finds himself, even until the moment of death, in the status viatoris, in the state of being on the way’. Hope, therefore, is a longing for (...)
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  11.  5
    Sacramentally Imagining Sports as a Form of Worship: Reappraising Sport as a Gesture of God.John Bentley White - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (1):94-114.
    We live in a world in which God is made known in and through God’s material works, which are other than himself. That is, they are signs of God’s presence whether in the natural world or the world we structure, as God’s image bearers, in our practices, rituals, and the stuff we make. The Christian tradition holds that the created order and human creativity witness to God, because creation is suffused with God’s presence. A sacramental understanding of sports aims to (...)
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