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  1.  1
    Logic, Rules and Intention: The Principal Aim Argument.Leon Culbertson - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (4):440-452.
    Stephen Mumford develops his view of sport spectatorship partly through a rejection of an argument he attributes to Best, which distinguishes between two categories of sports, the ‘purposive’ and the ‘aesthetic’, on the basis of the claim that they have different principal aims. This paper considers the principal aim argument and one feature of Mumford’s rejection of that argument, namely, Best’s observation that the distinctions to which he draws attention are based on logical differences. The paper argues that Mumford misconstrues (...)
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  2.  3
    Philosophy of Sport: Key Questions. [REVIEW]Paul Davis - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (4):480-483.
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  3. Dispute Resolution in Sport: Athletes, Law and Arbitration. [REVIEW]Kornbeck Jacob - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (4):477-480.
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  4.  7
    eSport Gaming: The Rise of a New Sports Practice.Llorens Mariona Rosell - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (4):464-476.
    Over recent years, the eSport phenomenon has grown in players and audience. The broadcast of certain eSport events have become worldwide mass events. Conceiving eSport gaming as an actual sports practice is not yet common, but it is current issue that deserves careful attention. This article stands on the idea that eSport gaming could be considered a sport and it examines some reasons on that regard. First of all, the piece will elucidate what the practice of gaming involves and if (...)
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  5.  2
    Did Armstrong Cheat?Moore Eric - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (4):413-427.
    In this paper, I explore the idea that under one way of understanding cheating, Armstrong did not fulfill any of the three necessary conditions: that cheating violates a rule—I will make the case that though doping was against the official rules, it was not against the rules the athletes used; that it is cheating if the intent is to obtain an unfair advantage—I will argue that dopers were not attempting to obtain an unfair advantage, at least on one plausible understanding (...)
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  6.  1
    Foucault and the Glamazon: The Autonomy of Ronda Rousey.Pam R. Sailors & Charlene Weaving - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (4):428-439.
    In this paper, we examine the case of Ronda Rousey, a high profile female Mixed Martial Arts fighter in the Ultimate Fighting Championship. We argue that Rousey represents a female athlete who can be considered a gender transgressor yet simultaneously a Glamazon. The case of Rousey will be applied to gender transgressor theories to demonstrate that Rousey counters traditional discourse which holds that exhibiting stereotypically masculine traits implies not being an authentic woman. Female fighters face criticisms for being “unfeminine” or (...)
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  7. Intelligence, Practice and Virtue: A Critical Review of the Educational Benefits of Expertise in Physical Education and Sport.Malcolm Thorburn - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (4):453-463.
    The paper calls for a re-evaluation of physical education’s cognitive value claims, as this issue is fundamental to many of the conceptual difficulties the subject faces. Current epistemological challenges are reviewed before analysing the structural connections between intelligent practice and intelligent virtues, and the possibilities for physical education to better articulate its’ intrinsic and instrumental values claims. The paper evaluates arguments made on this basis and reviews revised curriculum planning and pedagogical practices, which could support an enhanced focus on learners’ (...)
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  8.  1
    Intentional and Skillful Neurons.Jens Erling Birch - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (3):339-356.
    In the mid-1990s, there was a major neuroscientific discovery which might drastically alter sport science in general and philosophy of sport in particular. The discovery of mirror neurons by Giacomo Rizzolatti and colleagues in Parma, Italy, is a substantial contribution to understanding brains, movements, and humans. Famous neuroscientist V. S. Ramachandran believes the discovery of mirror neurons ‘will do for psychology what DNA did for biology’. Somehow mirror neurons have not received the deserved attention in the philosophy of sport, but (...)
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  9. Appendix: An Interview with Leonardo Fogassi.Jens Erling Birch - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (3):396-410.
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  10. Neuropsychology Behind the Plate.Jordan Edmund DeLong - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (3):385-395.
    In baseball, plate umpires are asked to make difficult perceptual judgments on a consistent basis. This chapter addresses some neuro-psychological issues faced by umpires as they call balls and strikes, and whether it is ethical to ask fallible humans to referee sporting events when faced with technology that exposes “blown” calls.
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  11.  1
    Team Spirit, Team Chemistry, and Neuroethics.Fiala Andrew - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (3):357-369.
    This paper examines the phenomenon of team spirit from a neurobiological point of view. It argues that ethical judgment should be involved in understanding and evaluating the idea. Adopting a liberal individualist point of view helps us understand the phenomenology of team spirit, while also helping us to articulate a critique of communitarian approaches that celebrate the sort of de-individuation that occurs in team spirit. The paper recognizes further complexity in terms of cross-cultural issues, as well as the tendency to (...)
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  12.  7
    Ethics, Brain Injuries, and Sports: Prohibition, Reform, and Prudence.Francisco Javier Lopez Frias & Mike McNamee - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (3):264-280.
    In this paper, we explore the issue of the elimination of sports, or elements of sports, that present a high risk of brain injury. In particular, we critically examine two elements of Angelo Corlett’s and Pam Sailors’ arguments for the prohibition of football and Nicholas Dixon’s claim for the reformation of boxing to eliminate blows to the head based on the empirical assumption of an essential or causal connection between brain injuries incurred in football and the development of a degenerative (...)
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  13. Two Kinds of Brain Injury in Sport.P. Fry Jeffrey - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (3):294-306.
    After years of skepticism and denials regarding the significance of concussions in sport, the issue is now front and center. This is fitting, given that the impact of concussions in sport is profound. Thus, it is with trepidation that one ventures to direct some attention onto brain injuries other than concussions incurred through sport. Given a closer look, however, it may be that considering various kinds of brain injuries, with different causes, will help us better understand the range and seriousness (...)
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  14. Sport, Ethics, and Neurophilosophy.Jeffrey P. Fry & Mike McNamee - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (3):259-263.
    The influence of neuroscience looms large today. In this introductory essay, we provide some context for the volume by acknowledging the expansion of applied neuroscience to everyday life and the proliferation of neuroscientific disciplines. We also observe that some individuals have sounded cautionary notes in light of perceived overreach of some claims for neuroscience. Then we briefly summarize the articles that comprise this volume. This diverse collection of papers represents the beginning of a conversation focused on the intersection of sport, (...)
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  15.  1
    Governing Sporting Brains: Concussion, Neuroscience, and the Biopolitical Regulation of Sport.Jennifer Hardes - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (3):281-293.
    Drawing on the recent concussion litigation from the United States’ National Football League, the paper examines the emergence of neuroscience knowledge as part of a defining rationale for the justification and rationalization of the lawsuit. The paper argues that neuroscience knowledge is best understood as a regulatory discourse that is attached to larger social, political, and economic realities that bring it into being as a legitimate type of knowledge. This larger socio-political governance logic is one that scholars call ‘biopolitical’ which (...)
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  16.  1
    High-Level Enactive and Embodied Cognition in Expert Sport Performance.Kevin Krein & Jesús Ilundáin-Agurruza - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (3):370-384.
    Mental representation has long been central to standard accounts of action and cognition generally, and in the context of sport. We argue for an enactive and embodied account that rejects the idea that representation is necessary for cognition, and posit instead that cognition arises, or is enacted, in certain types of interactions between organisms and their environment. More specifically, we argue that enactive theories explain some kinds of high-level cognition, those that underlie some of the best performances in sport and (...)
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  17.  3
    On the Compatibility of Brain Enhancement and the Internal Values of Sport.Sampedro Alberto Carrio & Triviño José Luis Pérez - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (3):307-322.
    Elite athletes are characterized by their high level of performance in sport. Since the very beginnings of sport, it has been understood that physical and physiological abilities influence the performance of athletes. Advances in scientific knowledge, especially sport psychology and neuroscience, seem to confirm this intuition and consequently it is possible to characterize elite athletes as having an extraordinary combination of physical and mental abilities. Techniques and substances that contribute to enhancing physical characteristics of athletes have also been well known (...)
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  18. Skiing and its Discontents: Assessing the Turist Experience From a Psychoanalytical, a Neuroscientific and a Sport Philosophical Perspective.Hub Zwart - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (3):323-338.
    This article addresses the question whether skiing as a nature sport enables practitioners to develop a rapport with nature, or rather estranges and insulates them from their mountainous ambiance. To address this question, I analyse a recent skiing movie from a psychoanalytical perspective and from a neuro-scientific perspective. I conclude that Jean-Paul Sartre’s classical but egocentric account of his skiing experiences disavows the technicity involved in contemporary skiing as a sportive practice for the affluent masses, which actually represents an urbanisation (...)
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  19.  4
    Sports Philosophy Now – the Culture of Sports After the Lance Armstrong Scandal. [REVIEW]Ask Vest Christiansen - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (2):251-255.
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  20.  2
    Evaluating Violent Conduct in Sport: A Hierarchy of Vice.Paul Davis & Emily Ryall - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (2):207-218.
    The landscape of sport shows conspicuous discursive and material disparities between the responses to openly violent on-field transgressors and the responses to other kinds of transgressor, most notably drug users. The former gets off significantly lighter in terms of ideological framing and formal punishment. The latter—and drug users in particular—are typically demonised and heavily punished, whilst the former are regularly lionised, dramatised, celebrated and punished less severely. The preceding disparities cannot be upheld from the standpoint of morality in general or (...)
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  21.  5
    Athletics and Philosophy in the Ancient World: Contests of Virtue. [REVIEW]Daniel Dombrowski - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (2):243-245.
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  22.  1
    The Philosophy of Sport in Interesting Times.Andrew Edgar - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (2):153-154.
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  23.  2
    Routledge Handbook of Drugs and Sport. [REVIEW]Francisco Javier López Frías - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (2):245-251.
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  24.  2
    Toward a Genealogy of Spectacle: Understanding Contemporary Spectacular Experiences. [REVIEW]Jesús Ilundáin-Agurruza - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (2):238-243.
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  25. Paralympics and the Fabrication of ‘Freak Shows’: On Aesthetics and Abjection in Sport.Kutte Jönsson - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (2):224-237.
    Two years before the opening of the Paralympic Games in London in 2012, the British TV network Channel 4 launched a campaign called Freaks of Nature. As part of the campaign they produced the short film Meet the Superhumans by director Tom Tagholm. The film became an immediate success, but was also criticised for portraying the Paralympians as ‘freaks’ and for reducing the Paralympics to a ‘freak show’. But was it wrong to describe the Paralympics as a ‘freak show’? Is (...)
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  26. Olympism as Opera Operans: An Existential Philosophical Perspective.Dmitrii Konstantinov - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (2):169-177.
    The purpose of this article is to consider critically the humanistic potential of Olympism. We consider the concepts ‘human’ and ‘humanism’ from an existential perspective. Existentialism argues that human beings exist in a state of freedom. Freedom, as the basis of being human, holds a human fully responsible for his or her own existence. This responsibility assumes an active mode of behaviour, predicated on human effort. It can also include the making of specific artifacts such as creating creations. According to (...)
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  27. Dark Mermaid. [REVIEW]Verner Møller - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (2):255-257.
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  28. On Some Philosophical Foundations of the Disappointing Performances of the African Soccer Teams in World Competitions.Tamba Nlandu - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (2):192-206.
    For decades, African senior club and national soccer teams, involved in world competitions, have failed to perform beyond mere honorable appearances. In this paper, we explore two of the fundamental causes underlying these disappointing performances. First, we examine the dilemma which forces almost all the African federations to overlook the Africa-based players in favor of those based outside the continent. Second, we show that the roots of the poor performances of the African teams go far beyond this crippling dilemma. Indeed, (...)
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  29.  1
    Compensated Sex-Integrated Individual Competitions in Ski Jumping: A Response to Hämäläinen.Arvi Pakaslahti - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (2):219-223.
    In this paper, I criticize Mika Hämäläinen’s recent argument for compensated sex-integrated individual competitions in ski jumping. I argue that Hämäläinen’s argument is problematic at least in four different ways. Two of my criticisms are intended to show that Hämäläinen ignores some important considerations which he should have discussed. On the other hand, I also argue that Hämäläinen’s argument is inherently flawed in two respects.
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  30.  12
    A Discussion of Kretchmar’s Elements of Competition.Richard Royce - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (2):178-191.
    Recently Kretchmar attempted to apply and to explore Husserl’s transcendental phenomenological method in relation to clarifying, in the context of sport particularly, the main features of competition. He concludes with the strong claim that competition is unintelligible unless understood in relation to the four elements of plurality, comparison, normativity, and disputation. Roughly, the idea is that competition needs to be understood as a context in which more than one competitor is involved; where competitors are compared; that comparisons are evaluations of (...)
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  31.  2
    Body, Environment and Adventure: Experience and Spatiality.Ana Zimmermann & Soraia Saura - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (2):155-168.
    The purpose of this article is to investigate human spatiality and perception in general, with the experience of adventure sports as its background. These activities highlight especially our strong relationship with the world when we consider the specific way in which the environment participates in the development of human potential. We first analyse the notions of risk and instability as important elements in adventure sports. Then we explore the notion of experience and spatiality, considering the way in which we establish (...)
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  32. Inhibiting Doping in Sports: Deterrence is Necessary, but Not Sufficient.Larry D. Bowers & Raymond Paternoster - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (1):132-151.
    The use of performance-enhancing drugs is a significant problem in sport. It cheats clean athletes of their hard-earned rewards from perfecting their skills though dedication and hard work. It defrauds fans by substituting a distorted playing field for a true competition. Anti-doping agencies have been charged with enforcing drug policies, primarily through the use of drug testing programs. We propose that drug testing, while important, is not sufficient to achieve deterrence. Engaging the principles of perceptual deterrence and development of a (...)
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  33.  6
    An Alternative Solution to Lifting the Ban on Doping: Breaking the Payoff Matrix of Professional Sport by Shifting Liability Away From Athletes.Silvia Camporesi - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (1):109-118.
    The persistence of doping in professional sports—either by individuals on an isolated basis and by whole teams as part of a systematic doping programme—means that professional sport today is rarely if ever untainted. There are financial incentives in place that incentivise doping and there are data that show that doping is often a systematic, organised enterprise. The main question to be answered today in professional sports is whether doping’s repressive anti-doping policies do not have greater negative consequences for society. Whilst (...)
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  34.  3
    Breakthrough Victories: How Can a Loser Ever Win?Paul Gaffney - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (1):3-11.
    The domain of sport provides opportunity for development and growth, which is often incremental but can be marked by significant breakthroughs. Using Aristotle’s virtue ethic as a model, this paper explores the challenge of overcoming new obstacles, sometimes reversing bad habits, in the athletic domain. Breakthrough victories in sport are achievements that both reward persistent effort and open new horizons in the pursuit of excellence. They are significant because they seem to hold out a promise for future performance, now that (...)
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  35.  1
    Muscular Imaginings—A Phenomenological and Enactive Model for Imagination.Jesús Ilundáin - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (1):92-108.
    A phenomenological model is developed as an alternative to current analyses of the imagination in sport philosophy, heirs to an Enlightenment notion that conceptualizes imaginings as abstract, eidetic, and representational. EC describes how Eidetic and Corporeal Imaginings phenomenologically structure our imaginative undertakings. EIs keep the ‘ideal’ aspect, but CIs—enacted, corporeal, non-representational—are more fundamental and foundational. Sports are particularly suited to express CIs’ muscular imaginings, which result in novel performances. An enactive framework theorizes CIs as non-representational interactions.
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  36.  3
    Muscular Imaginings—A Phenomenological and Enactive Model for Imagination.Ilundáin-Agurruza Jesús - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (1):92-108.
    A phenomenological model is developed as an alternative to current analyses of the imagination in sport philosophy, heirs to an Enlightenment notion that conceptualizes imaginings as abstract, eidetic, and representational. EC describes how Eidetic and Corporeal Imaginings phenomenologically structure our imaginative undertakings. EIs keep the ‘ideal’ aspect, but CIs—enacted, corporeal, non-representational—are more fundamental and foundational. Sports are particularly suited to express CIs’ muscular imaginings, which result in novel performances. An enactive framework theorizes CIs as non-representational interactions.
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  37.  3
    The Governance of Sport.Lev Kreft - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (1):119-131.
    Political philosophy is an examination of distribution of power in human communities and institutions. In previous period when identity issues were the most important political approach philosophy of sport had to deal mostly with discrimination and much less with the distribution of power in sport governance. Recent scandals revealed that at the top of sport governing bodies. Even more: it exposed the political character of the distribution of unleashed power in sport. That is why it is not enough to punish (...)
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  38. Games and Fiction: Partners in the Evolution of Culture.Scott Kretchmar - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (1):12-25.
    In this essay, I argue that the time is right in the philosophy of sport to follow the lead of systems thinking and emphasize the contextual embeddedness of sport, not its distinctive characteristics, least of all any claims for metaphysical independence. Accordingly, I analyze similarities between two cultural conventions—namely, literature and games—through the lens of evolution. I argue that common roots can be observed in games and fiction when looking at them structurally, semantically, and socially. I suggest that both games (...)
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  39.  5
    The Exercise Pill: Should We Replace Exercise with Pharmaceutical Means?Sigmund Loland - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (1):63-74.
    New physiological and pharmacological research points to the possibility of a pill that produces the complete physiological effects of exercise. Is replacement of exercise with a pill a good idea? And if so, under what circumstances? To explore answers, I have examined three approaches to the understanding exercise. From a dualist point of view, exercise is explained mechanistically in terms of physiological cause and effect relationships. From this perspective, and in particular for reluctant exercisers, there seems to be no strong (...)
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  40.  1
    Safe Danger – On the Experience of Challenge, Adventure and Risk in Education.Irena Martínková & Jim Parry - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (1):75-91.
    This article reconsiders the presence and value of danger in outdoor and adventurous activities and sports in safety-conscious societies, especially in relation to the education of children and youth. Based on an original analysis of the relation between the concepts of ‘risk’ and ‘danger’, we offer an account of the relation between challenge, adventure, risk and danger, and emphasise the importance of teaching risk recognition, risk assessment, risk management and risk avoidance to children and youth, without the necessity of exposing (...)
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  41.  3
    Sport, Religion and Charisma.Verner Møller - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (1):52-62.
    Since the end of the Second World War, the popularity of modern elite sport has grown immensely and so has the economical interests in sport. Athletes have become attractive advertising partners. Much money is at stake so it is understandable that companies are alarmed when their poster boys or girls are caught up in scandals. Inspired by a recent study, which found that stock return of primary team sponsors in cycling was not affected if the team was involved in doping (...)
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  42.  12
    Athletes as Heroes and Role Models: An Ancient Model.Heather Reid - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (1):40-51.
    A common argument for the social value of sport is that athletes serve as heroes who inspire people – especially young people – to strive for excellence. This argument has been questioned by sport philosophers at a variety of levels. Not only do athletes seem unsuited to be heroes or role models in the conventional sense, it is unclear more generally what the social and educational value of athletic excellence could be. In this essay, I construct an argument for the (...)
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  43.  3
    Strategic Fouling and Sport as Play.J. S. Russell - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (1):26-39.
    This essay argues that defences of strategic fouling in sport are enriched and supported by better recognizing the role of play in sport. A common characteristic of play is its disengagement from the everyday, in particular its moral disengagement. If sport in its best manifestations is a species of play, then we should expect to find some moral disengagement there. And indeed we do in a variety of ways. Strategic fouling affords a useful example to illustrate and support this claim (...)
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