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  1.  3
    Golf as Meaningful Play. A Philosophical Guide.Francisco Javier Lopez Frias - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 13 (1):107-110.
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  2.  8
    Virtue Games—Real Drugs.John T. Holden, Anastasios Kaburakis & Joanna Wall Tweedie - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 13 (1):19-32.
    The growth of esports as a recognized, organized, competitive activity in North America and Europe has evolved steadily from one of the most prominent sport industries in several Asian countries. Esports, which is still pursuing a widely accepted governance structure, has struggled to control the factors that typically act as a breeding ground for sport corruption. Within the esports industry, there is alleged widespread use of both prescription and off-label use of stimulants, such as modafinil, methylphenidate, and dextroamphetamine. Anti-doping policy (...)
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  3.  5
    The I in Team. Sports Fandom and the Reproduction of Identity.Terry McMurtry & Francisco Javier López Frías - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 13 (1):111-114.
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  4.  30
    E-Sports Are Not Sports.Jim Parry - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 13 (1):3-18.
    The conclusion of this paper will be that e-sports are not sports. I begin by offering a stipulation and a definition. I stipulate that what I have in mind, when thinking about the concept of sport, is ‘Olympic’ sport. And I define an Olympic Sport as an institutionalised, rule-governed contest of human physical skill. The justification for the stipulation lies partly in that it is uncontroversial. Whatever else people might think of as sport, no-one denies that Olympic Sport is sport. (...)
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  5.  2
    Recognition, Respect and Athletic Excellence.Sylvia Burrow - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 13:1-16.
    Scholars across disciplines recognize sport as an institution perpetuating sexism and bias against women in light of its masculine ideals. However, little philosophical research identifies how a masculine environment impacts women’s possibilities in sport. This paper shows that socially structured masculine ideals of athletic excellence impact recognition of women’s athletic achievements while contributing to contexts endangering respect and self-respect. Exploring athletic disrespect reveals connections to more broadly harmful sport practices that include physical and sexual violence. Thus, the practical concern is (...)
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  6.  2
    Morgan’s Conventionalism Versus WADA’s Use of the Prohibited List: The Case of Thyroxine.A. J. Bloodworth, M. J. McNamee & R. Jaques - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (4):401-415.
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  7.  2
    The Proper Place for External Motivations for Sport and Why They Need Not Subvert Its Internal Goods.Nicholas Dixon - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (4):361-374.
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  8. Unwritten Rules and the Press of Social Conventions.Daniel T. Durbin - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (4):416-434.
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  9.  2
    Early in the Morgan: Leftist Theories of Sport.Drew Hyland - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (4):339-347.
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  10.  6
    Homo Forte: A Philosophical Tribute to Muscle.Scott Kretchmar - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (4):375-385.
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  11. Morgan, the ‘Gratuitous’ Logic of Sport, and the Art of Self-Imposed Constraints.Sigmund Loland - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (4):348-360.
    Sport occupies a significant role in modern society and has a wide following. In his Leftist Theories of Sport, Morgan examines what he considers to be a degradation of modern sport and the lack of proper critical theory to address this challenge. In the latter part of LTS, Morgan presents a reconstructed critical theory with ‘a liberal twist’ in terms of an analysis of what he sees as the internal ‘gratuitous’ logic of sport, and a call for critical deliberation in (...)
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  12.  3
    Occasions for Making Sense of Sport: Celebrating Morgan’s View.Graham McFee - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (4):435-452.
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  13. A Response to the Special Issue Contributors.William J. Morgan - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (4):468-488.
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  14.  7
    A Critique of Conventionalist Broad Internalism.J. S. Russell - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (4):453-467.
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  15.  3
    William J. Morgan on Fair Play, Treatment Versus Enhancement and the Doping Debates in Sport.Angela J. Schneider - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (4):386-400.
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  16.  5
    Questions of Athletic Excellence and Justice in Sport.Adam Berg - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (3):292-303.
    This essay delineates and analyzes two kinds of questions that sport ethicists tend to ask: questions about athletic excellence and questions about justice. To pass ethical judgements when delving into questions concerning athletic excellence, sportspeople rely largely on a sport’s internal values, primary skills, or sport-specific athletic excellences. In contrast, questions about justice do not and should not include the reference or application of principles derived from the nature of a sport. Instead, sportspeople must refer to general theories, most often (...)
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  17.  2
    Disparaging Trademarks and Social Responsibility.Jasmine E. McNealy - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (3):304-316.
    This study examines the use of disparaging and offensive trademarks and mascots by sports teams. Specifically, this study considers whether the continued use of Native American symbols and mascots in sports comports with the Christians-Nordenstreng conceptualization of social responsibility, which considers the three principles of human dignity, truth-telling, and nonmaleficence. To do this, the article considers the history and arguments both for and against the use of these symbols in sports communication. This article concludes with a discussion of how the (...)
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  18.  5
    World Cup 2018.Andrew Edgar - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (3):239-240.
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  19.  3
    Sport Philosophy Inquiry in 3D: A Pragmatic Response to the Philosophy Paradox.Tim L. Elcombe - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (3):317-333.
    A paradoxical attitude exists toward professional philosophy: philosophical inquiry is considered important and complex, but professionals are deemed irrelevant and unnecessary. This paradox doubly affects sport philosophy as evidenced by the field’s marginalization in higher education and sociopolitical discourse. To counter the sport philosophy paradox, I present a pragmatically oriented three-dimensional approach to inquiry that turns the field “inside-out”. A community of engaged, melioratively oriented sport philosophy inquirers in this 3D model collectively conducts theoretical, applied, and instrumental inquiry. Each dimension (...)
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  20.  6
    Games, Rules, and Practices.Yuval Eylon & Amir Horowitz - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (3):241-254.
    We present and defend a view labeled “practiceism” which provides a solution to the incompatibility problems. The classic incompatibility problem is inconsistency of:1. Someone who intentionally violates the rules of a game is not playing the game.2. In many cases, players intentionally violate the rules as part of playing the game.The problem has a normative counterpart:1’. In normal cases, it is wrong for a player to intentionally violate the rules of the game.2’. In many normal cases, it is not wrong (...)
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  21.  7
    Ideology, Doping and the Spirit of Sport.Vincent Geeraets - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (3):255-271.
    The current World Anti-doping Code can be characterised as a tough approach to doping. In this paper we investigate how the World Anti-Doping Agency justifies this tough approach. To this end, WADA advances two justificatory arguments. It maintains, first, that protection of the spirit of sport warrants tough measures and, second, that athletes have voluntarily consented to the Code. We argue that in the way they are presented by WADA, neither of these arguments can withstand scrutiny. In the second part (...)
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  22.  6
    Financial Doping in the English Premier League.Hywel Iorwerth, Paul Tomkins & Graham Riley - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (3):272-291.
    Whilst the relationship between money and success in elite sport is acknowledged, the exact nature, extent and implications of this relationship is one that has not been carefully examined. In this paper, we have three main aims. Firstly, to provide empirical evidence of the extent that money buys success in the English Premier League. Secondly, to evaluate this evidence from a sports ethics perspective, and finally, to discuss potential solutions to the problem. We argue that the evident performance advantage teams (...)
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  23. Insides and Outsides: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Animate Nature. [REVIEW]R. Scott Kretchmar - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (3):334-337.
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  24.  4
    Intentionality and Action in Sport: A Discussion of the Views of Searle and Dreyfus.Gunnar Breivik - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (2):133-148.
    The article looks at sport as a form of human action where the participants display various forms of Intentionality. Intentionality may be defined as ‘that property of many mental states and events by which they are directed at or about or of objects and states of affairs in the world.’ Sporting actions are about human intentions, beliefs, desires, perceptions and not to forget, movements. This means that sports typically display what we call ‘Intentionality.’ The study of Intentionality and intentional actions (...)
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  25.  1
    Criteria, Defeasibility and Rules: Intention and the Principal Aim Argument.Leon Culbertson - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (2):149-161.
    This paper builds on a previous discussion of Stephen Mumford’s rejection of what he takes to be David Best’s argument for a distinction between purposive and aesthetic sports. That discussion concluded that Mumford’s argument misses its target, but closed by introducing a possible alternative argument, not made by Mumford, that might be thought to have the potential to secure Mumford’s conclusion. This paper considers that alternative argument, namely, the thought that the ascription of psychological predicates conceived of in terms of (...)
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  26.  2
    The Intrinsic Wrongness of Trash Talking and How It Diminishes the Practice of Sport: Reply to Kershnar.Nicholas Dixon - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (2):211-225.
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  27.  3
    Henning Eichberg.Andrew Edgar - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (2):115-116.
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  28.  5
    Gliding Body – Sitting Body. From Bodily Movement to Cultural Identity.Henning Eichberg, Signe Højbjerre Larsen & Kirsten K. Roessler - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (2):117-132.
    Bodily movement has a deeper meaning than modern sport science might recognize. It can have religious undertones, and in modern societies, it is sometimes related to the building of national identity. In the study, two cases of bodily practice are compared. Norwegian ski has a relation to friluftsliv and is highly significant for modern Norwegian identity. Indian yoga is related to the traditional ayurveda medicine and to Hindu spirituality, and obtained an important place in the process of anti-colonial nationalism. The (...)
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  29.  5
    Sports and ‘Minorities’: Negotiating the Olympic Model.Sylvain Ferez, Sébastien Ruffié & Stéphane Héas - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (2):177-193.
    This paper studies ‘minority’ initiatives to organize sports games. A meta-analysis of published data in the literature identifies the formal appearance taken by each of these initiatives under the Olympic model. But it also conduces to build a number of indicators to answer a series of questions about their logic and strategies. All the initiatives studied are based on an ambivalent posture that, while based on the denunciation of a discriminating space, claim access to it. By an astonishing paradox, ‘non-normative’ (...)
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  30.  11
    For Ownership Theory: A Response to Nicholas Dixon.Stephen Kershnar - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (2):226-235.
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  31.  3
    Environmental Ethics as Applied to Outdoor Physical Practices: An Analysis Through the Lens of Hans Jonas.Thierry Long, Damien Bazin & Heesoon Bai - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (2):194-210.
    In times of social and moral crises, sport has often been called to boost individual moral development. By the same token, outdoor activities are viewed as good educational practices to enhance environmental responsibility. However, the present paper argues that these physical activities are currently following the same technological development trend as the mainstream society, and challenges this trend itself in terms of sustainability by critically asking this question: Do outdoor activities really enhance environmental responsibility? The research supporting this paper is (...)
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  32.  3
    On the Concept of Fair Competition Prevalent in Today’s European Soccer Leagues.Tamba Nlandu - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (2):162-176.
    The notion of competition depicted in sport literature appears to be inconsistent with the goals of current European soccer competitions. This paper examines two misconceptions of fair competition which are prevalent in these competitions. First, it aims at refuting the view that professional soccer only requires some basic equality of chances beyond the differences in players’ skills and managers’ knowledge of game strategy. In other words, it refutes the view that professional soccer only demands a notion of fair competition understood (...)
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  33.  1
    Questioning Play: What Play Can Tell Us About Social Life.Emily Ryall - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (2):236-238.
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  34.  8
    Sport for the Sake of the Soul.Michael W. Austin - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (1):20-29.
    The relationship between Christianity and sport is a long and varied one. Christian thinkers, past and present, have been highly critical of sport, for a variety of reasons. Others have been much more positive, and extol the virtues of sport. In this paper, I argue that sport is a context in which the Christian theological virtues of faith, hope, and love can be cultivated and displayed. One significant worry about this claim is that using sport to cultivate these theological virtues, (...)
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  35.  7
    Game Spirituality: How Games Tell Us More Than We Might Think.Chad Carlson - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (1):81-93.
    While we often see games as less serious or at least less transcendental than religion there is reason to believe that games can evoke similarly meaningful narratives that allow us to learn a great deal about ourselves and our world. And games do so often using the same symbolic and metaphorical mechanisms that generate meaning in religious experience. In this paper, I explore some of the ways in which game myths—the myths created from and through games—generate meaning in our lives. (...)
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  36.  7
    Love Your Opponent as Yourself: A Christian Ethic for Sport.Shawn Graves - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (1):50-69.
    In this paper, we’ll present, explain, and defend a Christian ethic for sport that takes loving all individuals as the fundamental moral imperative. First, we’ll begin by taking a seeming detour through views about the morality of war. More specifically, we’ll consider realism, according to which, roughly, moral requirements and rules are suspended during war such that it is misguided to attempt to apply moral terms to acts performed within the context of war. Second, by paying attention to relevant surveys (...)
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  37.  4
    Christian Instrumentality of Sport as a Possible Source of Goodness for Atheists.Ivo Jirásek - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (1):30-49.
    The aim of this paper is to differentiate between religion and spirituality more strictly, or, specifically, between the religious and spiritual aspects of sport. The text is written in an autoethnographic genre from an ‘outsider’ position, by an author who is not Christian. Religion, including Christianity, represents a connectedness between the natural world and an ontologically different reality and its transcendence towards the sacrum. But spirituality is the centre of the human way of being and a manifestation of personality. So (...)
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  38.  19
    Chesterton on Play, Work, Paradox, and Christian Orthodoxy.Scott Kretchmar & Nick J. Watson - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (1):70-80.
    In this essay we attempt to accomplish two things related to the work of G.K. Chesterton. The first is to use one of his favorite ploys to articulate the nature of play. We discuss several paradoxical characteristics of play and attempt to show how seemingly contradictory features actually help us to understand play’s allure and other values. We introduce the second topic of theological analyses of work and play with a review of the Christian literature on these subjects. We then (...)
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  39.  5
    A Special Issue on Sport and Spirituality.Scott Kretchmar & John White - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (1):1-3.
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  40.  5
    Hope & Kinesiology: The Hopelessness of Health-Centered Kinesiology.Gregg Twietmeyer - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (1):4-19.
    Hope is necessary for kinesiology. Hope is profoundly human, because it is a fact of our nature. Human life is organic. We hope because we are by nature oriented to the future. Motion, growth, development and temporality are at the core of our lives. The great Thomistic philosopher Josef Pieper puts it this way: ‘man finds himself, even until the moment of death, in the status viatoris, in the state of being on the way’. Hope, therefore, is a longing for (...)
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  41.  12
    Sacramentally Imagining Sports as a Form of Worship: Reappraising Sport as a Gesture of God.John Bentley White - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (1):94-114.
    We live in a world in which God is made known in and through God’s material works, which are other than himself. That is, they are signs of God’s presence whether in the natural world or the world we structure, as God’s image bearers, in our practices, rituals, and the stuff we make. The Christian tradition holds that the created order and human creativity witness to God, because creation is suffused with God’s presence. A sacramental understanding of sports aims to (...)
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