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  1.  1
    Evaluating Violent Conduct in Sport: A Hierarchy of Vice.Paul Davis & Emily Ryall - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (2):207-218.
    The landscape of sport shows conspicuous discursive and material disparities between the responses to openly violent on-field transgressors and the responses to other kinds of transgressor, most notably drug users. The former gets off significantly lighter in terms of ideological framing and formal punishment. The latter—and drug users in particular—are typically demonised and heavily punished, whilst the former are regularly lionised, dramatised, celebrated and punished less severely. The preceding disparities cannot be upheld from the standpoint of morality in general or (...)
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  2. The Philosophy of Sport in Interesting Times.Andrew Edgar - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (2):153-154.
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  3.  2
    Routledge Handbook of Drugs and Sport. [REVIEW]Francisco Javier López Frías - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (2):245-251.
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  4. Paralympics and the Fabrication of ‘Freak Shows’: On Aesthetics and Abjection in Sport.Kutte Jönsson - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (2):224-237.
    Two years before the opening of the Paralympic Games in London in 2012, the British TV network Channel 4 launched a campaign called Freaks of Nature. As part of the campaign they produced the short film Meet the Superhumans by director Tom Tagholm. The film became an immediate success, but was also criticised for portraying the Paralympians as ‘freaks’ and for reducing the Paralympics to a ‘freak show’. But was it wrong to describe the Paralympics as a ‘freak show’? Is (...)
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  5. Olympism as Opera Operans: An Existential Philosophical Perspective.Dmitrii Konstantinov - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (2):169-177.
    The purpose of this article is to consider critically the humanistic potential of Olympism. We consider the concepts ‘human’ and ‘humanism’ from an existential perspective. Existentialism argues that human beings exist in a state of freedom. Freedom, as the basis of being human, holds a human fully responsible for his or her own existence. This responsibility assumes an active mode of behaviour, predicated on human effort. It can also include the making of specific artifacts such as creating creations. According to (...)
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  6. Compensated Sex-Integrated Individual Competitions in Ski Jumping: A Response to Hämäläinen.Arvi Pakaslahti - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (2):219-223.
    In this paper, I criticize Mika Hämäläinen’s recent argument for compensated sex-integrated individual competitions in ski jumping. I argue that Hämäläinen’s argument is problematic at least in four different ways. Two of my criticisms are intended to show that Hämäläinen ignores some important considerations which he should have discussed. On the other hand, I also argue that Hämäläinen’s argument is inherently flawed in two respects.
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  7.  2
    An Alternative Solution to Lifting the Ban on Doping: Breaking the Payoff Matrix of Professional Sport by Shifting Liability Away From Athletes.Silvia Camporesi - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (1):109-118.
    The persistence of doping in professional sports—either by individuals on an isolated basis and by whole teams as part of a systematic doping programme—means that professional sport today is rarely if ever untainted. There are financial incentives in place that incentivise doping and there are data that show that doping is often a systematic, organised enterprise. The main question to be answered today in professional sports is whether doping’s repressive anti-doping policies do not have greater negative consequences for society. Whilst (...)
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  8. Muscular Imaginings—A Phenomenological and Enactive Model for Imagination.Jesús Ilundáin - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (1):92-108.
    A phenomenological model is developed as an alternative to current analyses of the imagination in sport philosophy, heirs to an Enlightenment notion that conceptualizes imaginings as abstract, eidetic, and representational. EC describes how Eidetic and Corporeal Imaginings phenomenologically structure our imaginative undertakings. EIs keep the ‘ideal’ aspect, but CIs—enacted, corporeal, non-representational—are more fundamental and foundational. Sports are particularly suited to express CIs’ muscular imaginings, which result in novel performances. An enactive framework theorizes CIs as non-representational interactions.
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  9.  1
    Muscular Imaginings—A Phenomenological and Enactive Model for Imagination.Ilundáin-Agurruza Jesús - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (1):92-108.
    A phenomenological model is developed as an alternative to current analyses of the imagination in sport philosophy, heirs to an Enlightenment notion that conceptualizes imaginings as abstract, eidetic, and representational. EC describes how Eidetic and Corporeal Imaginings phenomenologically structure our imaginative undertakings. EIs keep the ‘ideal’ aspect, but CIs—enacted, corporeal, non-representational—are more fundamental and foundational. Sports are particularly suited to express CIs’ muscular imaginings, which result in novel performances. An enactive framework theorizes CIs as non-representational interactions.
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  10.  1
    The Governance of Sport.Lev Kreft - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (1):119-131.
    Political philosophy is an examination of distribution of power in human communities and institutions. In previous period when identity issues were the most important political approach philosophy of sport had to deal mostly with discrimination and much less with the distribution of power in sport governance. Recent scandals revealed that at the top of sport governing bodies. Even more: it exposed the political character of the distribution of unleashed power in sport. That is why it is not enough to punish (...)
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  11. Games and Fiction: Partners in the Evolution of Culture.Scott Kretchmar - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (1):12-25.
    In this essay, I argue that the time is right in the philosophy of sport to follow the lead of systems thinking and emphasize the contextual embeddedness of sport, not its distinctive characteristics, least of all any claims for metaphysical independence. Accordingly, I analyze similarities between two cultural conventions—namely, literature and games—through the lens of evolution. I argue that common roots can be observed in games and fiction when looking at them structurally, semantically, and socially. I suggest that both games (...)
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  12.  3
    The Exercise Pill: Should We Replace Exercise with Pharmaceutical Means?Sigmund Loland - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (1):63-74.
    New physiological and pharmacological research points to the possibility of a pill that produces the complete physiological effects of exercise. Is replacement of exercise with a pill a good idea? And if so, under what circumstances? To explore answers, I have examined three approaches to the understanding exercise. From a dualist point of view, exercise is explained mechanistically in terms of physiological cause and effect relationships. From this perspective, and in particular for reluctant exercisers, there seems to be no strong (...)
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  13. Safe Danger – On the Experience of Challenge, Adventure and Risk in Education.Irena Martínková & Jim Parry - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (1):75-91.
    This article reconsiders the presence and value of danger in outdoor and adventurous activities and sports in safety-conscious societies, especially in relation to the education of children and youth. Based on an original analysis of the relation between the concepts of ‘risk’ and ‘danger’, we offer an account of the relation between challenge, adventure, risk and danger, and emphasise the importance of teaching risk recognition, risk assessment, risk management and risk avoidance to children and youth, without the necessity of exposing (...)
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  14. Sport, Religion and Charisma.Verner Møller - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (1):52-62.
    Since the end of the Second World War, the popularity of modern elite sport has grown immensely and so has the economical interests in sport. Athletes have become attractive advertising partners. Much money is at stake so it is understandable that companies are alarmed when their poster boys or girls are caught up in scandals. Inspired by a recent study, which found that stock return of primary team sponsors in cycling was not affected if the team was involved in doping (...)
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