Studies in East European Thought

ISSNs: 0925-9392, 1573-0948

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  1.  16
    People are born to struggle: Vladimír Čermák’s vision of democracy.Jiří Baroš - 2024 - Studies in East European Thought 76 (2):157-175.
    During the Czechoslovak normalization era (roughly from the 1970s to the 1980s), the Czech lawyer Vladimír Čermák, who later became a Justice of the newly established Constitutional Court of the Czech Republic after the breakdown of the Communist regime, authored a monumental piece called The Question of Democracy. Although this ambitious work has no equal in the Czech context, no attention has been paid to it in the English-speaking world. The present article aims to fill this gap by analyzing the (...)
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  2.  16
    The post festum-rationality of history in Georg Lukács’ Ontology.Ákos Forczek - 2024 - Studies in East European Thought 76 (2):177-192.
    During the winter of 1968–69, members of the so-called Budapest School formulated a scathing “review” of Georg Lukács’ late work, Ontology of Social Being. In the wake of the objections (but not in accordance with them), Lukács began to revise the text, but was unable to complete it: he died in June 1971. The disciples’ critique, published in English and German in 1976, played a major role in the reception history of Ontology—or rather in the fact that the 1500-page “philosophical (...)
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  3.  20
    Two responses to the “Sophia Affair” and Bulgakov’s theology of authority.Daniel Kisliakov - 2024 - Studies in East European Thought 76 (2):213-225.
    One of the most contentious events of Russian religious thought of the twentieth century was the “Sophia Affair”, which befell Bulgakov in 1935. This article compares and contrasts two responses by Nikolai Berdyaev and Sergius Bulgakov and what they say about freedom of thought in Russian theology, what that means in a socio-cultural context and the impact that had on the development of Russian theology. This is then compared with an article by Bulgakov written chronologically close to the events in (...)
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  4.  20
    Defining nothingness: Kazimir Malevich and religious renaissance.Tatiana Levina - 2024 - Studies in East European Thought 76 (2):247-261.
    In the treatise “Suprematism. The World as Objectlessness or Eternal Peace” (1922), Kazimir Malevich positions himself as a “bookless philosopher” who did not consider theories of other philosophers. In fact, the treatise contains a large number of references to philosophers belonging to different traditions. A careful reading shows the extent to which Malevich’s theory is linked to the Russian religious philosophy of the early twentieth century. In my view, Nikolai Berdyaev, Sergei Bulgakov, Pavel Florensky—philosophers of “Religious Renaissance,” as well as (...)
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  5.  28
    The ideas of the Scottish Enlightenment in Russia: Adam Smith and Semyon Efimovich Desnitskii on the philosophy of history.Ondrej Marchevský & Sandra Zákutná - 2024 - Studies in East European Thought 76 (2):289-304.
    The paper focuses on the mutual interaction as well as the impact of the Scottish Enlightenment on the formation of the Enlightenment in Russia during the reign of Catherine the Great. It focuses on the relationship between the work of Adam Smith and Semyon Efimovich Desnitskii, who, thanks to Desnitskii’s studies at the University of Glasgow, got to know each other as teacher and student. The central point of their interaction is the issues of the philosophy of history based on (...)
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  6.  7
    Review of: Diana Gasparyan, The Philosophic Path of Merab Mamardashvili, Leiden and Boston, Brill, 2021, 176 pages, Hardcover ISBN 978-9004465817, £95.91. [REVIEW]Harry James Moore - 2024 - Studies in East European Thought 76 (2):337-339.
  7.  9
    Mikhail Bakhtin and Lev Shestov on Dostoevsky: the unfinalized dialogue.Marina G. Ogden - 2024 - Studies in East European Thought 76 (2):263-287.
    Bakhtin’s view of the history of the novel, through the lens of Dostoevsky’s writing in his famous study on Dostoevsky’s poetics (1963), has had a significant impact on the way we read Dostoevsky today. On the other hand, Shestov’s original explorations of the human soul, which were drawn on his reading of Dostoevsky and made a lasting impression on his contemporaries, are still relatively unknown to the English-speaking reader. Having traced the history of the regenerations of Dostoevsky’s convictions in his (...)
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  8.  10
    Hegel and the origins of Marxism—remarks on Russian and Chinese Marxism.Tom Rockmore - 2024 - Studies in East European Thought 76 (2):193-211.
    This paper has two main aims. First, it examines the relation of Russian and Chinese Marxism against its Hegelian background. Secondly, it comments on recent Western research on Marxism in tracing the origins of Engels’s anti-Hegelianism to materialist reactions to modern idealist philosophy. I maintain that Engels is a Schellingian, that Marx is a Hegelian, and that Marx’s form of Hegelianism cannot be realized in practice. I consider different kinds of Marxism as efforts to realize Marx’s theories and argue that, (...)
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  9.  11
    Ota Weinberger’s conception of democracy: reconstructing an unexplored political theory.Marián Sekerák - 2024 - Studies in East European Thought 76 (2):139-155.
    Ota Weinberger was a Czech-Austrian jurist, whose core academic work on issues of democracy was mostly published in the 1990s. In his writings, he focused primarily on legal philosophy from a positivist perspective. However, there are also significant overlaps with the field of political theory as Weinberger examined the conditions for the functioning of contemporary democracies. In this paper, some of the main features of his conception of the so-called “structured democracy” are clarified. The conception opposed several other democratic theories, (...)
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  10.  5
    Review of Sofya Khagi, Pelevin and Unfreedom: Poetics, Politics, Metaphysics, Evanston, IL, Northwestern University Press, 2021. xi+284 pp. $39.95; £36.50. ISBN 978-0-81014-302-9. [REVIEW]Lina Steiner - 2024 - Studies in East European Thought 76 (2):333-335.
  11.  3
    Review of: Jeremy Pilch, ‘Breathing the Spirit With Both Lungs’: Deification in the Work of Vladimir Solov’ev, Eastern Christian Studies 25, Leuven, Paris & Bristol, Peeters, 2018, 249 pages, ISBN 978-90-429-3425-2 (paperback), €88.25. [REVIEW]Evert van der Zweerde - 2024 - Studies in East European Thought 76 (2):341-345.
  12.  2
    David Riazanov and the Leninist stage of Soviet Marxism.James D. White - 2024 - Studies in East European Thought 76 (2):227-245.
    Focusing on David B. Riazanov career and his pioneering efforts in producing a complete edition of the works of Marx and Engels, the article explains why Riazanov’s variety of Marxism was unacceptable to the Soviet regime, and why from 1924 Lenin was credited with being an outstanding Marxist theoretician, whereas previously he had been regarded only as a skilled political activist. The concept of Leninism as a new stage of Marxism was put forward by Bukharin and elaborated on by Stalin (...)
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  13.  4
    Alexander Scriabin as a Russian Cosmist.Ali Yansori - 2024 - Studies in East European Thought 76 (2):305-331.
    In the secondary literature on Scriabin, it is not uncommon to come across the names of philosophers such as Nikolai Fyodorov, Vladimir Solovyov, and Nikolai Berdyaev. The present paper examines the shared characteristics between Scriabin’s philosophy and the ideas of such figures who are typically referred to as Russian Cosmists. In doing so, the paper illustrates what new insights we can gain by considering Scriabin from the perspective of Russian Cosmism. Despite the overwhelming evidence of Russian Cosmists’ significant influence on (...)
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  14.  10
    Introduction to Alexandre Kojève’s “Moscow, August 1957”.Isabel Jacobs - 2024 - Studies in East European Thought 76 (1):117-122.
    This paper analyzes Russian-French philosopher Alexandre Kojève’s dialogue with proponents of Hegelianism and phenomenology in Soviet Russia of the 1920–30s. Considering works by Dmytro Chyzhevsky, Ivan Ilyin, Gustav Shpet, and Alexandre Koyré, I retrace Hegelian themes in Kojève, focusing on the relation between method and time. I argue that original reflections on method played a key role in both Russian Hegelianism and Kojève’s work, from his famous Hegel lectures to the late fragments of a system. As I demonstrate, Kojève’s Hegelianism (...)
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  15.  14
    Thinking in circles: Kojève and Russian Hegelianism.Isabel Jacobs - 2024 - Studies in East European Thought 76 (1):41-58.
    This paper analyzes Russian-French philosopher Alexandre Kojève’s dialogue with proponents of Hegelianism and phenomenology in Soviet Russia of the 1920–30s. Considering works by Dmytro Chyzhevsky, Ivan Ilyin, Gustav Shpet, and Alexandre Koyré, I retrace Hegelian themes in Kojève, focusing on the relation between method and time. I argue that original reflections on method played a key role in both Russian Hegelianism and Kojève’s work, from his famous Hegel lectures to the late fragments of a system. As I demonstrate, Kojève’s Hegelianism (...)
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  16.  11
    Alexandre Kojève and Russian philosophy.Isabel Jacobs & Trevor Wilson - 2024 - Studies in East European Thought 76 (1):1-7.
    This paper analyzes Russian-French philosopher Alexandre Kojève’s dialogue with proponents of Hegelianism and phenomenology in Soviet Russia of the 1920–30s. Considering works by Dmytro Chyzhevsky, Ivan Ilyin, Gustav Shpet, and Alexandre Koyré, I retrace Hegelian themes in Kojève, focusing on the relation between method and time. I argue that original reflections on method played a key role in both Russian Hegelianism and Kojève’s work, from his famous Hegel lectures to the late fragments of a system. As I demonstrate, Kojève’s Hegelianism (...)
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  17.  6
    The paradoxical anchoring of Kojève’s philosophizing in the tradition of Russian religious philosophy.Annett Jubara - 2024 - Studies in East European Thought 76 (1):9-24.
    The subject of this paper is Alexandre Kojève’s relationship to Russian Religious Philosophy, which is characterized by a paradoxical contrast between Kojève’s openly critical judgment of it, on the one hand, and the hidden, implicit influence of this philosophical tradition on his own atheistic philosophizing on the other. The hidden influence of Russian Religious Philosophy, Kojève’s engagement with the philosophical ideas of Vladimir Solovyov and Fyodor Dostoevsky, will be shown by two case studies. The first case is about Kojève’s “reshaping” (...)
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  18.  18
    On creative freedom and the souls’ fabrication.Alexandre Kojève & Rambert Nicolas - 2024 - Studies in East European Thought 76 (1):113-116.
  19.  13
    Moscow: August, 1957.Alexandre Kojève & Trevor Wilson - 2024 - Studies in East European Thought 76 (1):123-130.
  20.  4
    Religion in Alexandre Kojève’s atheistic philosophy of science.Ivan Sergeevich Kurilovich - 2024 - Studies in East European Thought 76 (1):91-107.
    This paper focuses on Kojève’s account of history and philosophy of science. Kojève’s understanding of science can be characterized as internalism, which is evident in his holistic view of philosophy, theology, quantum physics, and the history of classical Newtonian mechanics. It precipitates the facilitation of a further inquiry into the Christian genesis, secular evolution, and subsequent de-Christianization of scientific thought. The paper includes a critical scrutiny of Kojève’s philosophical tenets, followed by a comparative analysis of the views of Hegel, Koyré, (...)
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  21.  14
    Stalin with Kant or Hegel?Jeff Love - 2024 - Studies in East European Thought 76 (1):59-74.
    Alexandre Kojève declared himself a Stalinist. This declaration has puzzled his own students from the inter-war period and many later commentators. The present article takes Kojève at his word; its imaginative thrust is to cast Kojève’s declaration in the context of a more comprehensive reflection on revolution and the revolutionary project undertaken by Stalinism. Kojève envisages revolution as completing history and ushering in a new era, whose exact contours appear paradoxical, since the end of history is also the end of (...)
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  22.  8
    Review of: Marco Filoni, L’azione politica del filosofo: La vita e il pensiero di Alexandre Kojève, Torino, Bollati Boringhieri editore, 2021, 346 pages, paperback ISBN 978-88-339-3790-8. [REVIEW]Kyle Moore - 2024 - Studies in East European Thought 76 (1):131-133.
  23.  16
    Alexandre Kojève: revolution and terror.Alexey M. Rutkevich - 2024 - Studies in East European Thought 76 (1):25-39.
    When discussing the French Revolution and Napoleon in his lectures from 1933 to 1939, Alexandre Kojève had in mind events in Russia. The clash between the “old order,” with its Masters, and the worker Slaves corresponded for him more with the images of pre-revolutionary Russian journalism than with the wigged aristocrats and French bourgeoisie of the end of the eighteenth century. In his lectures, behind Napoleon, as a revolutionary emperor, there exists, however secretly or openly, the figure of Stalin, with (...)
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  24.  5
    Review of: D. N. Drozdova, O. L. Granovskaia, and A. M. Rutkevich, eds., Perekrestki kul’tur: Aleksandr Koire, Aleksandr Kozhev, Isaiia Berlin [Crossroads of cultures: Alexandre Koyré, Alexandre Kojève, Isaiah Berlin], ROSSPEN, 2021, ISBN 978-5-8243-2425-9, 558 pages, 396 rubles. [REVIEW]Sofia Sorokina - 2024 - Studies in East European Thought 76 (1):135-138.
  25.  11
    Alexandre Kojève’s photography: some reflections.Dmitry Tokarev - 2024 - Studies in East European Thought 76 (1):75-90.
    The article critically addresses Boris Groys’ interpretation of photographs by Alexandre Kojève. In 2012, Groys organized the exhibition After History: Alexandre Kojève as a Photographer, which intended to demonstrate the “posthistorical” dimension in Kojève’s artistic output. The article questions the adequacy of that perspective, given the somewhat tendentious curatorial presentation of the photos as showing an empty, dehumanized world. Considering the aesthetic and ontological aspects of the analysis of visual images that were central to Kojève’s brief account of his 1920 (...)
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  26.  7
    Introduction to Alexandre Kojève, “On Creative Freedom and Souls’ Fabrication. Response to Professor N. A. Berdyaev.”.Trevor Wilson - 2024 - Studies in East European Thought 76 (1):109-111.
  27.  7
    Bergson's Fundamental Intuition.Frederic Tremblay & Semyon L. Frank - 2024 - Studies in East European Thought. Translated by Frederic Tremblay.
    The following text is a translation of Semyon Frank’s “L’intuition fondamentale de Bergson” published in Henri Bergson: Essais et témoignages inédits, edited by Albert Béguin and Pierre Thévenaz, Neuchâtel: Éditions de la Baconnière, 1941. In this article, Frank addresses Bergson’s notion of intuition, his anti-intellectualism, his mysticism, his closeness to Lebensphilosophie, the notion of lived experience, the distinction between intuition as pure contemplation and intuition as living knowledge, the distinction between cognition of the atemporal essence of reality and cognition of (...)
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