Year:

  1.  4
    The Concept of Universality in Oleg Drobnitskii’s Moral Philosophy.Ruben Apressyan - 2021 - Studies in East European Thought 73 (1):95-112.
    The article analyzes the concept of universality in Oleg Drobnitskii’s ethics. As opposed to most Soviet ethicists of the 1960s and early 1970s, Drobnitskii viewed this concept along the lines of the principle of universality presented in the moral theories of Immanuel Kant and Richard Hare. However, while they considered universality to be a feature of individual moral thinking in the forms of maxims, principles, and evaluations, Drobnitskii understood universality as the main feature of moral requirements and essentially external to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  4
    Imago Dei as a Critique of Capitalism and Marxism in Nikolai Berdyaev.Raul-Ovidiu Bodea - 2021 - Studies in East European Thought 73 (1):77-93.
  3.  7
    The Irrationality of Labour in Stanisław Brzozowski’s Philosophy of “Labour”.Krystof Kasprzak - 2021 - Studies in East European Thought 73 (1):37-52.
    This article explores the concept of labour through a diremptive reading of Polish philosopher Stanisław Brzozowski’s essay “Prolegomena filozofii ‘pracy’” written in 1909. This essay appears as a chapter in his main work Idee: wstęp do filozofii dojrzałości dziejowej, first published in 1910. In “Prolegomena,” Brzozowski defines labour as an inner gesture that delineates the duration of life. In the interpretation of this definition the influence of Henri Bergson on Brzozowski’s thought is stressed. Inspired by Bergson, Brzozowski understands labour as (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4.  5
    The Human Being in the Context of Contemporary Cognitive Studies and the Russian Tradition.Vladislav A. Lektorsky - 2021 - Studies in East European Thought 73 (1):19-35.
    Any complete understanding of human psychology must take into account that a brain’s actions in the world are mediated by the body it belongs to. In the process of such interaction the human being creates artificial things, structures and mechanisms, such as technology, relationships, and culture. The subjective world is not simply the interactions between neurons at different systemic levels, but the existence of mental contents, which are determined by specific features of a certain domain of reality with which a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  4
    James D. White: Marx and Russia: The Fate of a Doctrine London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2019, 240 Pp, ISBN-10: 1474224067; ISBN-13: 978-1474224062. [REVIEW]Andrey Maidansky - 2021 - Studies in East European Thought 73 (1):113-116.
  6.  5
    Antinomism in Twentieth-Century Russian Philosophy: The Case of Pavel Florensky.Harry James Moore - 2021 - Studies in East European Thought 73 (1):53-76.
    This study examines the notion of antinomy, or unavoidable contradiction, in the work of Pavel Florensky. Many Russian philosophers of the Silver Age shared a common conviction which is yet to receive sufficient attention in critical literature, either in Russia or abroad. This is namely a philosophical and theological dependence on unavoidable contradiction, paradox, or antinomy. The history of antinomy and its Russian reception is introduced here before a new framework for understanding Russian antinomism is defended. This is namely the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  2
    Alexander Bogdanov’s Holistic World Picture: A Materialist Mirror Image of Idealism.David G. Rowley - 2021 - Studies in East European Thought 73 (1):1-18.
    Between 1899 and 1906, Alexander Bogdanov developed a scientific philosophy intended to substantiate the basic principle of historical materialism—the idea that existence determines consciousness—in terms of the most advanced science and empiricist epistemology/ontology of his day. At the same time, however, he strove ‘to answer the broad needs of our workers for an overall worldview’, and in the process of doing so he elaborated a complete philosophical system and a holistic worldview. Although his intention was to serve the proletariat and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  3
    Karel Sládek, Nikolay Lossky and the Case for Mystical Intuition. [REVIEW]Frédéric Tremblay - 2021 - Studies in East European Thought 73 (1):117-120.
    The book under review is a translation of a monograph written in Czech entitled Nikolaj Losskij: Obhájce mystické intuice, published in 2011. As a theologian, the author is above all interested in the spiritual and theological aspects of Lossky’s thought. The first two chapters are concerned with Lossky’s life and work before and during his years in Czechoslovakia. The third chapter is devoted to the analysis and interpretation of Lossky’s booklet Mystical Intuition published in English in 1938, wherein Lossky presents (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Karel Sládek, Nikolay Lossky and the Case for Mystical Intuition: Translated by Pavlina and Tim Morgan, Karolinum Press, Prague, 2020, Paperback, 158 P., 240 Czk, ISBN 978-80-246-4570-4. [REVIEW]Frédéric Tremblay - 2021 - Studies in East European Thought 73 (1):117-120.
    The book under review is a translation of a monograph written in Czech entitled Nikolaj Losskij: Obhájce mystické intuice, published in 2011. As a theologian, the author is above all interested in the spiritual and theological aspects of Lossky’s thought. The first two chapters are concerned with Lossky’s life and work before and during his years in Czechoslovakia. The third chapter is devoted to the analysis and interpretation of Lossky’s booklet Mystical Intuition published in English in 1938, wherein Lossky presents (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues