22 found

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  1.  3
    A Happy Immoralist: The Case of Richard Rich.Steven M. Cahn - 2022 - Think 21 (61):29-31.
    Many philosophers, past and present, have been loath to admit the possibility of a happy immoralist. Here is a historical case featured in the play and film A Man for All Seasons.
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  2. The Metaphysics of Farts.Bill Capra - 2022 - Think 21 (61):39-43.
    I consider the metaphysics of farts. I contrast the essential-bum-origin view with a phenomenological view, and I argue in favour of the latter.
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  3.  38
    The Prisoner's Dilemma Paradox: Rationality, Morality, and Reciprocity.Rory W. Collins - 2022 - Think 21 (61):45-55.
    This article examines the prisoner's dilemma paradox and argues that confessing is the rational choice, despite this probably entailing a less-than-ideal outcome.
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  4.  7
    Celebrities Discuss Philosophy Episode 4: A Transcript.Nikk Effingham - 2022 - Think 21 (61):57-72.
    If a lump of clay is shaped into a statue, is there one thing or are there two? That is: are the lump and the statue two distinct things? This dialogue introduces some reasons to think they are two different things and then discusses the issues involved.
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  5.  6
    The Ethics of Consumerism.Natasha Fenwick - 2022 - Think 21 (61):73-82.
    The definition of consumerism is multifaceted, extending from the consumption of goods and services to its more negative connotations: the obsessive consumption of goods, exploitation of the people who create them and greed. In a society heavily influenced by consumerism, we find ourselves manipulated by social media and targeted advertising to buy goods or to cultivate a certain lifestyle, raising important ethical questions about responsibility and our autonomy to make decisions. How has the nature of how we create and consume (...)
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  6. You Survive Teletransportation.Javier Hidalgo - 2022 - Think 21 (61):83-92.
    Suppose that it was possible to teletransport. The teletransporter would destroy your old brain and body and construct an identical brain and body at a new location. Would you survive teletransportation? Many people think that teletransportation would kill you. On their view, the person that emerges from the teletransporter would be a replica of you, but it wouldn't be you. In contrast, I argue that there's no relevant difference between teletransportation and ordinary survival. So, if you survive ordinary life, then (...)
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  7.  20
    The Roots of Responsibility.John Hyman - 2022 - Think 21 (61):23-27.
    Under what circumstances can we hold someone responsible for what they do?
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  8.  99
    Rejection, Denial and the Democratic Primaries.Luca Incurvati - 2022 - Think 21 (61):105-109.
    Starting from the case of insurance claims, I investigate the dynamics of acceptance, rejection and denial. I show that disagreement can be more varied than one might think. I illustrate this by looking at the Warren/Sanders controversy in the 2020 democratic primaries and at religious agnosticism.
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  9.  5
    Love Bytes: The Future of Bio–R2 Relationships.Jeremiah Joven B. Joaquin & Hazel T. Biana - 2022 - Think 21 (61):93-99.
    What would a romantic relationship between a biological human and an artificial intelligence system look like? The question is explored through a fictional correspondence between Alan Turing and Ada Lovelace.
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  10.  23
    Does God Exist?David Kyle Johnson - 2022 - Think 21 (61):5-22.
    In ‘Do Souls Exist?’ and ‘Does Free Will Exist?’ I laid out the reasons most philosophers doubt the existence of souls and free will. Here, in ‘Does God Exist?’, to complete the trilogy, I will lay out the reasons most philosophers doubt the existence of God: the best arguments for God fail, the most well-known argument against God succeeds, and philosophers are not keen to take things on faith.
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  11.  3
    Why Do so Few People Eat Giraffes?Bel Toledo & Ardon Lyon - 2022 - Think 21 (61):33-38.
    We argue that the size of the human population needs to be controlled whether or not people should be vegetarians. We than describe some of the varieties of human flesh eating round the world.
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  12.  4
    Comment for Think on Naturalism Versus Theism.Brenda Watson - 2022 - Think 21 (61):101-104.
    The search for common ground is hugely important and it depends on understanding in as fair a way as possible how words are being used by opponents in debate – in this case naturalism and theism.
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  13.  3
    How to Avoid Getting Killed by a Statue: Some Lessons on Teaching and Lying From Nietzsche's Thus Spoke Zarathustra.Stuart Dalton - 2022 - Think 21 (60):79-90.
    In Thus Spoke Zarathustra Nietzsche explores the nature of teaching and learning and concludes that a teacher can do more harm than good in a student's life if she allows her students to become her ‘disciples’. A disciple assigns too much authority to a teacher and thus loses the ability to think independently; this is what Zarathustra means when he warns his students, ‘Beware that you are not killed by a statue!’ In this article I argue that Zarathustra's solution to (...)
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  14.  18
    Happiness and the Good Life.David Louzecky - 2022 - Think 21 (60):21-31.
    The question I raise is whether happiness constitutes a good life. I argue that it does not and contend that the good life is based on three essentials: worthwhile activities, worthwhile character, and worthwhile relationships. I provide examples of possibly happy lives that are not good and good lives that are not happy.
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  15.  11
    Philosophy and the Meaning of Life.William Lyons - 2022 - Think 21 (60):33-49.
    The author sets out to respond to the student complaint that ‘Philosophy did not answer “the big questions”’, in particular the question ‘What is the meaning of life?’ The response first outlines and evaluates the most common religious answer, that human life is given a meaning by God who created us and informs us that this life is just the pilgrim way to the next eternal life in heaven. He then discusses the response that, from the point of view of (...)
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  16.  22
    Why Studying the History of Philosophy Matters.Anna Marmodoro - 2022 - Think 21 (60):5-20.
    The debate over whether and how philosophers of today may usefully engage with philosophers of the past is nearly as old as the history of philosophy itself. Does the study of the history of philosophy train or corrupt the budding philosopher's mind? Why study the history of philosophy? And, how to study the history of philosophy? I discuss some mainstream approaches to the study of the history of philosophy, before explicating the one I adopt and commend.
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  17.  6
    The Problem of Evil and the Procreation Analogy.John McClellan - 2022 - Think 21 (60):109-121.
    A prominent Christian apologist suggests it is inconsistent for an atheist to have a favourable attitude towards procreating while maintaining that a loving God would not place vulnerable beings in such a harmful world. I put this analogy to the test with a series of thought experiments, revealing crucial disanalogies between God and procreators that absolve the atheist from the charge of inconsistency and draw the reader's attention to the central issues on the problem of evil as debated by contemporary (...)
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  18.  9
    Application of Virtue Ethics to Human Life and Death.Anna Neale - 2022 - Think 21 (60):105-108.
    This article provides a reflection on how Aristotle's virtue ethics can be applied to matters of human life and death.
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  19.  2
    The Salutogenic Effects of Awe Told Existentially.Rachel Nelson - 2022 - Think 21 (60):91-104.
    Feelings of awe can generate well-being. The typical explanation of this is that an otherwise self-absorbed individual now experiences something so vast that it forges a humble new perspective of self. Self-absorption is replaced by altruistic characteristics that result in a sense of well-being. However, the observations of Martin Heidegger, Jean-Paul Sartre, and Carl Rogers provide an existential framework for understanding the human being in relation to the world and well-being within that framework. And such a framework offers a different (...)
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  20.  12
    Better to Have Children: A Response to Harrison and Tanner.Andrew Rotondo - 2022 - Think 21 (60):65-78.
    In Harrison and Tanner's ‘Better Not to Have Children’, it's argued that having children is immoral as well as detrimental to one's well-being. In this article, I argue against those claims and defend the position that, for most people, having children is morally permissible and greatly enhances their well-being.
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  21.  7
    On Retributive Justice.C. P. Ruloff & Patrick Findler - 2022 - Think 21 (60):57-64.
    Hsiao has recently developed what he considers a ‘simple and straightforward’ argument for the moral permissibility of corporal punishment. In this article we argue that Hsiao's argument is seriously flawed for at least two reasons. Specifically, we argue that a key premise of Hsiao's argument is question-begging, and Hsiao's argument depends upon a pair of false underlying assumptions, namely, the assumption that children are moral agents, and the assumption that all forms of wrongdoing demand retribution.
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  22.  6
    A Short Argument for Belief in Progress.Saul Smilansky - 2022 - Think 21 (60):51-56.
    The notion of social progress is not much in favour in these sophisticated times of scepticism, cynicism, relativism and political correctness; at least in the West. Most people might admit that some indubitable advances have occurred, primarily in terms of this or that useful technological innovation. But any wider claim about ‘social progress’ is often met by overwhelming doubt and suspicion, if not outright derision. I provide a short argument for belief in progress.
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