23 found

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  1.  3
    Knowledge and Religious Belief.Maria Rosa Antognazza - 2021 - Think 20 (58):39-53.
    Introductions to epistemology routinely define knowledge as a kind of belief which meets certain criteria. In the first two sections of this article, I discuss this account and its application to religious epistemology by the influential movement known as Reformed Epistemology. In the last section, I argue that the controversial consequences drawn from this account by Reformed Epistemology offer one of the best illustrations of the untenability of a conception of knowledge as a kind of belief. I conclude by sketching (...)
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  2.  2
    Euthanasia.Lynne Bowyer - 2021 - Think 20 (58):93-102.
    In this article I consider the impact of euthanasia/physician-assisted suicide on the way we live and the relationships we have. I argue that embracing the practice of assisted dying is a deficient form of care that will erode the respectful and responsible human bonds that hold us all well in community.
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  3.  4
    Motherhood and the Moral Load.Laura Frances Callahan - 2021 - Think 20 (58):55-68.
    Many of the decisions mothers face are morally intense. They're experienced as highly morally significant, and they are also often very morally complex, meaning that there aren't black-and-white, obvious answers to questions about what one morally may or must do. For example, I suggest that breastfeeding is complex in this way, despite a good deal of cultural pressure in favour of trying to do it. Acknowledging many of the decisions of motherhood as complex or as ‘grey areas’ is accurate, and (...)
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  4.  4
    Is It Really About Being British?Hossein Dabbagh - 2021 - Think 20 (58):69-73.
    In this short piece, I argue in favour of the practice of imagining ‘others’ in a global way and taking universal moral thinking seriously. We are in need of a sense of global identity which can then create global moral thinking. In this way, we can start to see and treat global challenges, such as the environment, social justice, poverty, racism and Covid-19, more effectively.
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  5.  17
    Some Writing Tips for Philosophy.Brian D. Earp - 2021 - Think 20 (58):75-80.
    If you grade enough papers, you will find some consistent pitfalls, especially in the writing of students who are coming to philosophy for the first time. I wrote up the following tips a couple of years ago when I was a teaching assistant for an introductory philosophy class at Yale led by Daniel Greco called ‘Problems in Philosophy’. The tips were intended, then, for college students, many of them right out of high school, and most of whom had never written (...)
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  6.  9
    Writing in Philosophy: Reply to Frederick.Brian D. Earp - 2021 - Think 20 (58):89-92.
    Frederick offers a critique of my writing tips aimed at undergraduate students coming to philosophy – and in many cases, essay writing – for the first time Frederick claims that most of my tips are good tips but characterizes two of them as bad tips, as follows: Bad tip 1. Be very careful about making any universal claims. Such a claim can be refuted by just a single counterexample. Do not leave yourself open to such refutation. Make a universal claim (...)
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  7.  41
    Critique of Brian Earp's Writing Tips for Philosophers.Danny Frederick - 2021 - Think 20 (58):81-87.
    I criticize Brian Earp's ‘Some Writing Tips for Philosophy’. Earp's article is useful for someone who wishes to do well in analytic philosophy as currently practised but it also casts doubt on why such analytic philosophy would be of interest to someone who wants to learn something new. In addition to its good tips, Earp's article contains two bad tips which, if followed, will tend to produce a paper that says next to nothing. I list the two faulty tips, show (...)
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  8.  1
    On Mental Illness and Broken Brains.Anneli Jefferson - 2021 - Think 20 (58):103-112.
    We often hear that certain mental disorders are disorders of the brain, but it is not clear what this claim amounts to. Does it mean that they are like classic brain diseases such as brain cancer? I argue that this is not the case for most mental disorders. Neither does the claim that all mental disorders are brain disorders follow from a materialist world-view. The only plausible way of understanding mental disorders as brain disorders is a fairly modest one, where (...)
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  9.  3
    Think 58 Introduction.Stephen Law - 2021 - Think 20 (58):5-7.
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  10.  7
    Hume and the ‘Secret Connexion’: Why Causation is a Singular Affair.Robin Le Poidevin - 2021 - Think 20 (58):9-22.
    The great Scottish Enlightenment man of letters David Hume offered an account of causation in terms of regularities: repeated pairings of certain kinds of events. Anything more than this, a supposed ‘secret connexion’ binding individual causes and effects, is not something we could ever experience. This, at least, is the view traditionally ascribed to him. Here the account, and its empiricist motivation, is outlined, and a fundamental problem identified: his account of causation is in tension with his account of the (...)
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  11.  5
    Time Through Time: Its Evolution Through Western Philosophy in Seven Ideas.Emily Thomas - 2021 - Think 20 (58):23-38.
    What is time? Just like everything else in the world, our understanding of time has changed continually over time. This article tracks this question through the history of Western philosophy and looks at major answers from the likes of Aristotle, Kant, and McTaggart.
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  12.  10
    Should You Design the Perfect Baby?Laura D'Olimpio - 2021 - Think 20 (57):107-117.
    ABSTRACTAs our technology rapidly advances, designer babies and other bioethical issues are fast becoming possible. Instead of solely being considered in economic terms, or in terms of accuracy and desirability, ethical questions should also be asked such as ‘is this a good thing to do?’. This article considers whether moral people would ‘design’ and genetically engineer their babies and applies the moral theories of virtue ethics, deontology and utilitarianism to help guide our ethical decision-making in relation to this complex issue. (...)
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  13.  5
    Debating Gender.Brian D. Earp - 2021 - Think 20 (57):9-21.
    There is an ongoing public debate about sex, gender and identity that is often quite heated. This is an edited transcript of an informal lecture I recorded in 2019 to serve as a friendly guide to these complex issues. It represents my best attempt, not to score political points for any particular side, but to give an introductory map of the territory so that you can think for yourself, investigate further, and reach your own conclusions about such controversial questions as (...)
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  14.  2
    Is the Brain a Digital Computer? Rethinking a Binary Question.Yasemin J. Erden - 2021 - Think 20 (57):23-37.
    ABSTRACTIs the brain a digital computer? What about your own brain? This article will examine these questions, some possible answers, and what persistent disagreement on the topic might indicate. Along the way we explore the metaphor at the heart of the question and assess how observer relativity features in it. We also reflect on the role of models in scientific endeavour. By the end you should have a sense of why the question matters, what some answers to it might be, (...)
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  15.  6
    Alzheimer's Disease and Relationships of Value.Marion Godman - 2021 - Think 20 (57):39-51.
    In this article, I consider my relationship with my father who developed Alzheimer's disease and criticize dominant models of social interactions and relationships. I argue that the point of a relationship is not what we exchange or achieve within it. The point is not even that we depend on others for our vital needs. The point is simply that a relationship is valuable in and of itself.
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  16.  58
    The Kalam Cosmological Argument: Critiquing a Recent Defence.Phillip Halper - 2021 - Think 20 (57):153-165.
    ABSTRACTIn the late 1970s the big bang model of cosmology was widely accepted and interpreted as implying the universe had a beginning. At the end of that decade William Lane Craig revived an argument for God known as the Kalam Cosmological Argument based on this scientific consensus. Furthermore, he linked the big bang to the supposed biblical concept of creation ex nihilo found in Genesis. I shall critique Craig's position as expressed in a more recent update and argue that contemporary (...)
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  17.  4
    Introduction: Some Thoughts on the Desirability of Immortality.Stephen Law - 2021 - Think 20 (57):5-7.
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  18.  7
    Moore on the Sceptical Philosopher.Guy Longworth - 2021 - Think 20 (57):69-87.
    1. Since I don't know who you are, dear reader, and since I know that some people don't have hands, I don't know whether you have hands. Probably you do, but knowing that something is probable is rarely, if ever, a way of knowing that thing. By contrast, I know that I have hands. Let me check. Yes, here is one of my hands; and here is another. Since I know that here is one of my hands and that here (...)
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  19.  1
    Some Innocent Questions About Language.Ardon Lyon - 2021 - Think 20 (57):103-106.
    ABSTRACTPhilosophers and others often believe that a language used to talk about usage in a particular language should not be mixed with use of that language itself. I argue below that this opinion is mistaken.
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  20. The Covid-19 Pandemic and the Bounds of Grief.Louise Richardson, Matthew Ratcliffe, Becky Millar & Eleanor Byrne - 2021 - Think 20 (57):89-101.
    ABSTRACTThis article addresses the question of whether certain experiences that originate in causes other than bereavement are properly termed ‘grief’. To do so, we focus on widespread experiences of grief that have been reported during the Covid-19 pandemic. We consider two potential objections to a more permissive use of the term: grief is, by definition, a response to a death; grief is subject to certain norms that apply only to the case of bereavement. Having shown that these objections are unconvincing, (...)
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  21.  9
    Our Soul Makes Us Who We Are.Richard Swinburne - 2021 - Think 20 (57):53-67.
    ABSTRACTA ‘complex’ theory of personal identity analyses a person P2 being the same as an earlier person P1 in terms of some particular degree of physical or mental continuity between them. All such theories are open to an objection that the postulated degree of continuity is an arbitrary one, and many of them are open to the objection that more than one subsequent person could satisfy them. Necessarily, any subsequent person is either totally the same person as P1 or not (...)
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  22.  5
    A Philosopher Works From Home: Diaries of a Philosophical Romp Through Vast Territories, Sometimes Crossing Over Into Uncharted Regions Occupied by Other People.Mariam Thalos - 2021 - Think 20 (57):119-134.
    ABSTRACTThis is my impersonation of a philosopher working from home, which aims at making lively a few worthy philosophical questions. The old is new again, as each generation confronts its own challenges and demons, in its own context.
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  23.  6
    Considering Where is God in a Coronavirus World? An Exercise in Critical Thinking.Peter Worley - 2021 - Think 20 (57):135-151.
    ABSTRACTThis article is a critical response to a short book by John C. Lennox entitled Where is God in a Coronavirus World? in which he rejects atheism as a world-view equipped to deal with an event such as the coronavirus crisis and makes a case for the Christian outlook as the best way to meet such a crisis. The aim of this article is not to affirm or deny theism, but to examine critically the key arguments put forward for Christianity (...)
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