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  1.  16
    Art, Philosophy and the Connectivity of Concepts: Ricoeur and Deleuze and Guattari.Clive Cazeaux - 2019 - Journal of Aesthetics and Phenomenology 6 (1):21-40.
    ABSTRACTConcepts are traditionally pictured as discrete containers that bring together objects or qualities based on the possession of shared, uniform properties. This paper focuses on a contrasting notion of the concept which holds that concepts are defined by their capacity to reach out and connect with other concepts. Two theories in recent continental philosophy maintain this view: one from Ricoeur, the other from Deleuze and Guattari. Both are offered as attempts to bring art and philosophy into relation, but they differ (...)
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  2.  12
    Showing Off! A Philosophy of Image. [REVIEW]Robert Clarke - 2019 - Journal of Aesthetics and Phenomenology 6 (1):91-93.
    Volume 6, Issue 1, May 2019, Page 91-93.
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  3.  9
    Abstract City: The Phenomenological Basis for the Failures of Modernist Urban Design.Brian Irwin - 2019 - Journal of Aesthetics and Phenomenology 6 (1):41-58.
    ABSTRACTMany critics have pointed to the failures of modernist urban design, which include its obliteration of thriving neighborhoods, isolation of functions and production of alienating spaces hostile to the human form. Less focus has been placed on defining the source of the modernists’ errors. This essay argues that these errors were in part due to neglect of the nature of fully embodied experience, a neglect manifested in an overwhelmingly visual disposition in embodiment. The author argues that a visual disposition is (...)
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  4.  31
    Reading Oneself in the Text: Cavell and Gadamer’s Romantic Conception of Reading.David Liakos - 2019 - Journal of Aesthetics and Phenomenology 6 (1):79-87.
    ABSTRACTCan we gain knowledge by reading literature? This essay defends an account of reading, developed by Stanley Cavell and Hans-Georg Gadamer, that phenomenologically describes the experience of acquiring self-knowledge by reading literary texts. Two possible criticisms of this account will be considered: first, that reading can provide other kinds of knowledge than self-knowledge; and, second, that the theory involves illegitimately imposing subjective meaning onto a text. It will be argued, in response, that the self-knowledge gained in reading allows one to (...)
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  5.  15
    Moving Eyes: The Aesthetic Effect of Off-Centre Pupils in Portrait Paintings.Theis Vallø Madsen - 2019 - Journal of Aesthetics and Phenomenology 6 (1):59-78.
    ABSTRACTMost eighteenth- and nineteenth-century portrait paintings have eyes staring outward at the beholder. A minority of these eyes have slightly elevated pupils in comparison to the iris. These off-centre pupils are not the norm, but they occur regularly in works by skilful European portrait painters in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. This article takes a closer look at selected portrait paintings by Danish artists Jens Juel and Constantin Hansen and argues that the discrepancy between the pupils and the rest of (...)
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  6.  15
    Passivity in Aesthetic Experience: Husserlian and Enactive Perspectives.Tone Roald & Simon Høffding - 2019 - Journal of Aesthetics and Phenomenology 6 (1):1-20.
    ABSTRACTThis paper argues that the Husserlian notion of “passive synthesis” can make a substantial contribution to the understanding of aesthetic experience. The argument is based on two empirical cases of qualitative interview material obtained from museum visitors and a world-renowned string quartet, which show that aesthetic experience contains an irreducible dimension of passive undergoing and surprise. Analyzing this material through the lens of passive syntheses helps explain these experiences, as well as the sense of subject–object fusion that occurs in some (...)
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