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  1. John Dewey's Social and Political Philosophy in the China Lectures: Introduction.Roberto Frega - 2017 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 53 (1):3.
    In 1919–1920 John Dewey visited China, where he extensively lectured. Was had been initially planned as a short trip became a long-lasting experience of social and cultural discovery that lasted nearly two years1. Dewey’s arrival in China coincided with the ouburst of the May 4th Revolution, a nationwide student movement aimed at democratizing Chinese politics and society. Dewey’s Lectuers have to be seen in the context of this context, particularly as several leaders of the May 4th movement had been students (...)
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  2. Agonist Recognition, Intersections, and the Ambivalence of Family Bonds: John Dewey's Critical Theory Manifesto in China.Federica Gregoratto - 2017 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 53 (1):127.
    Traditions of thought remain vital and vivid if their borders are porous; they remain able to convey useful insights to understand our present, its roots in the past and its hints at new future perspectives if contaminations with other traditions are taken as a fruitful challenge and as a possibility of enrichment, not of jeopardy. Traditions of thought might be able to attract new followers if their models, criteria and methods are capable of transformation and amelioration. This view of traditions (...)
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  3. Thinking Under the Pressure of Practice: A Critical Interpretation of Dewey's Preparatory Notes for the Lectures in China.Roberto Gronda - 2017 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 53 (1):71.
    Dewey’s Lectures in China 1919–1920 is a highly controversial text. For many years, scholars have been suspicious about its reliability as a source: the book is an English translation of the Chinese translation of two series of lectures that Dewey held in China during the first year of his two year stay. For this reason, Deweyan scholars have tended to dismiss the text: they believed that Dewey’s speeches had been manipulated by Chinese translators driven less by textual fidelity than by (...)
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  4.  2
    Abductive Analysis: Theorizing Qualitative Research by Iddo Tavory, Stefan Timmermans.Niiniluoto Ilkka - 2017 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 53 (1):152-154.
    Charles S. Peirce’s conception of abductive reasoning became a hot topic in the philosophy of science after World War II, when N. R. Hanson suggested that abduction is a logic of discovery, Gilbert Harman argued that all types of inductive reasoning can be reduced to inference to the best explanation, and Howard Smokler suggested that abduction as inverse deduction is an important method of confirmation. Abduction has been a popular theme also in Artificial Intelligence. Illustrations and examples of abduction have (...)
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  5. The Centrality of Dewey's Lectures in China to His Socio-Political Philosophy.Gregory Pappas - 2017 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 53 (1):7.
    The recent discovery of the original manuscript Dewey wrote in preparation to his Lectures in China is an opportunity to revisit the question of what are the key texts in Dewey’s socio-political philosophy. The assumption in Dewey’s scholarship and teaching has been that The Public and its Problems or his other books on Liberalism are the main texts to be read.1 While these texts are important, much that is fundamental and that distinguishes Dewey’s approach from others would be missed without (...)
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  6. From [“Political Ethics”] to [“Social Philosophy”]: The Need for Social Theory.Emmanuel Renault - 2017 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 53 (1):90.
    The meanings and functions of the notion of social philosophy in John Dewey’s writings have not really been subjected to serious philological investigation. Until recently, Dewey scholarship has simply equated social philosophy either to political philosophy in general, or to philosophy of education,1 and in recent years we have tended to read this social philosophy from a retrospective point of view, with reference to contemporary debates about social philosophy as an alternative to contemporary political philosophy.2 One reason for this lack (...)
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  7. Degeneration of Associated Life: Dewey's Naturalism About Social Criticism.Arvi Särkelä - 2017 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 53 (1):107.
    A striking feature of John Dewey’s philosophical attitude in his later period is that for self-description, he did not prefer the term “pragmatism.” Instead, he employed such isms as “experimentalism” and “naturalism.” In the period in which he moved towards developing his own original philosophy, he even stated that “I reject root and branch to the term ‘pragmatism.’”1 As he was at the time drawn to naturalism, it might be revealing indeed that he rejects “root and branch” to “pragmatism.” Also (...)
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  8. Dominant Patterns in Associated Living: Hegemony, Domination, and Ideological Recognition in Dewey's Lectures in China.Italo Testa - 2017 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 53 (1):29.
    In this paper I will focus on the notion of “dominant patterns”, as revealed by the recently discovered typescript of what we can assume to be Dewey’s fragmentary and incomplete preliminary lectures notes for the Lecture Series on Social and Political Philosophy.1 I will show that the way the notion of “dominant patterns” is dealt with in the text of the lectures notes is not only consistent with the conceptual content of the whole series of the Lectures in China as (...)
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  9. Peirce and the Conduct of Life: Sentiment and Instinct in Ethics and Religion by Richard Kenneth Atkins.Wilson Aaron - 2017 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 53 (1):146-152.
    The heart of Richard Kenneth Atkins’s Peirce and the Conduct of Life: Sentiment and Instinct in Ethics and Religion is an interpretation and defense of Peirce’s sentimental conservatism, as well as an extension of that idea to Peirce’s philosophy of religion and to the casuistic approach to practical ethics. “A Defense of Peirce’s Sentimental Conservatism” is the explicit title of the second of the book’s six chapters. But the only chapter in which Peirce’s sentimental conservatism does not itself appear to (...)
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  10. Articulating a Sense of Powers: An Expressivist Reading of John Dewey's Theory of Social Movements.Justo Serrano Zamora - 2017 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 53 (1):53.
    In the series of lectures he delivered during the two years he spent in China, John Dewey provided the most complete version of his theory of social conflict and struggle. The two textual sources from this time we have at our disposal – the doubly translated lectures published in Honolulu2 and Dewey’s original notes recently published under the name of Lectures in Social and Political Philosophy 3 – outline an original understanding of social conflict as taking place between groups with (...)
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  11.  5
    The Philosophy of Gesture: Completing Pragmatists' Incomplete Revolution by Giovanni Maddalena.Richard Kenneth Atkins - 2017 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 52 (4):662-665.
    Rarely these days are philosophy books both bold and sweeping, but Maddalena’s The Philosophy of Gesture is both. Whether you think that is good will surely depend on your philosophical temperament. Personally, I consider it bad taste to criticize a philosopher for striking out on a new path. Philosophy, as any student of Peirce’s works will affirm, is an experimental science. Some of those experiments might well lead you to the hinterlands, but at least you will have a more detailed (...)
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  12.  1
    Linking the Aesthetic and the Normative in Peirce's Pragmaticism: A Heuristic Sketch.Ivo A. Ibri - 2017 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 52 (4):598-610.
    Charles S. Peirce Society 2016 Presidential Address Peirce never could finalize a book or publish it and especially no book on the aesthetic basis of pragmaticism. This is not only a historical note, but has a deeper meaning. It arouses in the attentive reader a strong desire to do what Peirce himself did not have the chance to do: to find a way of linking together his hints and clues in such a way that respects the spirit of his work (...)
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  13.  2
    The Ironist and the Romantic: Reading Richard Rorty and Stanley Cavell by Áine Mahon.Paul Jenner - 2017 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 52 (4):658-661.
    Richard Rorty and Stanley Cavell are both preoccupied with questions of contingency: whether conventions are ‘merely’ conventional, what kind of foothold they might provide, how to step away from convention, how to make convention one’s own. Not that the work of either philosopher could be described as conventional. Neither produced the philosophical equivalent of the ‘hackwork’ characterizing Thomas Kuhn’s ‘normal science’. Both philosophers invoke traditional philosophical argumentation, but do so only to depart from its terms. To some disciplinary sensibilities, both (...)
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  14.  1
    La Belleza En Charles S. Peirce: Origen y Alcance de Sus Ideas Estéticas by Sara Barrena.Nemesio García-Carril Puy - 2017 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 52 (4):652-658.
    La belleza en Charles S. Peirce: Origen y alcance de sus ideas estéticas is a clearly written and well-structured book on Peirce’s aesthetics. Barrena’s thesis is that aesthetics, conceived as a normative science, is central to Peirce’s philosophical system, and especially to his pragmaticism. The goal of the book is twofold: it aims to offer an analysis of the biographical and theoretical aspects of Peirce’s interest in aesthetics and the arts and purports to elaborate a pragmaticist aesthetics. Both objectives can (...)
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