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  1.  1
    The Semiotics of Emotional Expression.Trip Glazer - 2017 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 53 (2):189.
    Charles Sanders Peirce famously distinguishes between three types of sign, depending on how the sign refers to its object. An "icon" refers by resemblance. An "index" refers by a physical connection. And a "symbol" refers by habit or convention. Peirce allows for signs to refer in more ways than one—onomatopoeias refer both by resemblance and by convention, for instance 1—but he insists that there are no further ways in which signs can refer to their objects.In this paper I shall argue (...)
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  2. Charles S. Peirce's New England Neighbors and Embrace of Transcendentalism.Nicholas L. Guardiano - 2017 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 53 (2):216.
    In multiple autobiographical sketches, Charles S. Peirce identifies New England Transcendentalism as an essential part of his intellectual biography. A well-known instance is the passage opening "The Law of Mind" that identifies the setting of his childhood and early education within "the neighborhood of Concord": I may mention, for the benefit of those who are curious in studying mental biographies, that I was born and reared in the neighborhood of Concord,—I mean in Cambridge,—at the time when Emerson, Hedge, and their (...)
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  3.  6
    Post-Humanist Pragmatism.Paul Guernsey - 2017 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 53 (2):246.
    With these last words, the Dodger suffered himself to be led off by the collar, threatening, till he got into the yard, to make a parliamentary business of it, and then grinning in the officer's face, with great glee and self-approval.The Artful Dodger is a character to which philosophers ought to pay great heed. He embodies the dual meaning of "art" that is found in common use. The Dodger's clever craft in his daily struggle for existence is at the same (...)
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  4.  1
    Santayana's Anticipations of Deleuze: Total Natural Events and Quasi-Pragmatism.Joshua M. Hall - 2017 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 53 (2):270.
    In the present article, I hope to articulate three important implications of Mark Noble's recent observation that Deleuze at times "sounds curiously like Santayana."1 First, Santayana predates many of Deleuze's most famous insights. Thus, in regard to the influence on Deleuze of U.S. American thinkers, both Deleuze and his interpreters have been remiss in focusing almost exclusively on the Pragmatists. Second, one can helpfully understand both Deleuze and Santayana as U.S. American-influenced, European quasi-pragmatists. And finally, the most promising development in (...)
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  5.  1
    Emerson's Philosophical Hour of Friendship: A Reply to Robinson.Roger López - 2017 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 53 (2):291.
    "I imagine the two friends crossing the deserted streets of Paris at night and talking—about what? They speak of philosophy, intellectual matters."David M. Robinson's article "In the Golden Hour of Friendship": Transcendentalism and Utopian Desire locates a reversal in Emerson's essay "Friendship." Emerson, according to this reading, propounds and then rejects philosophy as a foundation of friendship; "Emerson enacts in this essay a quite extraordinary repudiation of his own philosophy. He first describes the desire of one individual for another as (...)
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  6.  1
    Autopoiesis and Transaction.Phillip McReynolds - 2017 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 53 (2):312.
    In this paper I argue that aspects of Deweyan pragmatism can and should be reconstructed in light of work in biological systems research. One background assumption for my argument is that pragmatism has been fruitfully stimulated by concepts arising from biology, evolution in particular. Another is that while pragmatism tends to be focused on practical problem solving, words and ideas often shape, frame, and help select what might appear as workable solutions and even how problems themselves come to be understood (...)
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  7. Skilled Rhetoricians, Experts, Intellectuals and Inventors: Kitcher and Dewey on Public Knowledge and Ignorance.Jón Ólafsson - 2017 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 53 (2):167.
    In the last chapter of The Public and its Problems John Dewey outlines the alleged fallacy of "the democratic creed". According to him the fallacy is described as conflating emancipation with the capacity to rule, i.e. the capacity to make policy decisions. His point is that the power to make decisions does not entail a capacity to make good choices. Capable are those in the know, the experts who are "intellectually qualified". The answer to the fallacy is to propose epistocracy: (...)
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  8.  2
    Pragmatism with Purpose: Selected Writings by Peter Hare.Pihlström Sami - 2017 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 53 (2):335-339.
    The author of the book under review here needs no introduction to the readers of this journal. Peter H. Hare, who served for several decades as a distinguished professor and department chair at the SUNY Buffalo Philosophy Department, was a co-editor of Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society for more than thirty years and played an absolutely crucial role in supporting and enhancing scholarship on pragmatism and American philosophy not only in the United States but globally, always insisting on (...)
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  9. Values, Valuations, and Axiological Norms in Richard Rorty's Neopragmatism by Krzysztof Piotr Skowroński.Chris Voparil - 2017 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 53 (2):339-343.
    Taking full measure of Rorty's influence and legacy demands encountering his reception outside North America. One such case, Eastern Europe, where Rorty spent considerable time and enjoys a committed following, is especially interesting, given the post-1989 resonance of his claims about the priority of democracy to philosophy.Polish philosopher Krzysztof Skowroński's attention to the underappreciated normative dimension of Rorty's pragmatism opens a window into this reception. This wide-ranging book advances a core – and, in my view, essential – insight: there is (...)
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  10. John Dewey's Social and Political Philosophy in the China Lectures: Introduction.Roberto Frega - 2017 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 53 (1):3.
    In 1919–1920 John Dewey visited China, where he extensively lectured. Was had been initially planned as a short trip became a long-lasting experience of social and cultural discovery that lasted nearly two years1. Dewey’s arrival in China coincided with the ouburst of the May 4th Revolution, a nationwide student movement aimed at democratizing Chinese politics and society. Dewey’s Lectuers have to be seen in the context of this context, particularly as several leaders of the May 4th movement had been students (...)
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  11. Agonist Recognition, Intersections, and the Ambivalence of Family Bonds: John Dewey's Critical Theory Manifesto in China.Federica Gregoratto - 2017 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 53 (1):127.
    Traditions of thought remain vital and vivid if their borders are porous; they remain able to convey useful insights to understand our present, its roots in the past and its hints at new future perspectives if contaminations with other traditions are taken as a fruitful challenge and as a possibility of enrichment, not of jeopardy. Traditions of thought might be able to attract new followers if their models, criteria and methods are capable of transformation and amelioration. This view of traditions (...)
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  12. Thinking Under the Pressure of Practice: A Critical Interpretation of Dewey's Preparatory Notes for the Lectures in China.Roberto Gronda - 2017 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 53 (1):71.
    Dewey’s Lectures in China 1919–1920 is a highly controversial text. For many years, scholars have been suspicious about its reliability as a source: the book is an English translation of the Chinese translation of two series of lectures that Dewey held in China during the first year of his two year stay. For this reason, Deweyan scholars have tended to dismiss the text: they believed that Dewey’s speeches had been manipulated by Chinese translators driven less by textual fidelity than by (...)
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  13.  3
    Abductive Analysis: Theorizing Qualitative Research by Iddo Tavory, Stefan Timmermans.Niiniluoto Ilkka - 2017 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 53 (1):152-154.
    Charles S. Peirce’s conception of abductive reasoning became a hot topic in the philosophy of science after World War II, when N. R. Hanson suggested that abduction is a logic of discovery, Gilbert Harman argued that all types of inductive reasoning can be reduced to inference to the best explanation, and Howard Smokler suggested that abduction as inverse deduction is an important method of confirmation. Abduction has been a popular theme also in Artificial Intelligence. Illustrations and examples of abduction have (...)
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  14. The Centrality of Dewey's Lectures in China to His Socio-Political Philosophy.Gregory Pappas - 2017 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 53 (1):7.
    The recent discovery of the original manuscript Dewey wrote in preparation to his Lectures in China is an opportunity to revisit the question of what are the key texts in Dewey’s socio-political philosophy. The assumption in Dewey’s scholarship and teaching has been that The Public and its Problems or his other books on Liberalism are the main texts to be read.1 While these texts are important, much that is fundamental and that distinguishes Dewey’s approach from others would be missed without (...)
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  15. From [“Political Ethics”] to [“Social Philosophy”]: The Need for Social Theory.Emmanuel Renault - 2017 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 53 (1):90.
    The meanings and functions of the notion of social philosophy in John Dewey’s writings have not really been subjected to serious philological investigation. Until recently, Dewey scholarship has simply equated social philosophy either to political philosophy in general, or to philosophy of education,1 and in recent years we have tended to read this social philosophy from a retrospective point of view, with reference to contemporary debates about social philosophy as an alternative to contemporary political philosophy.2 One reason for this lack (...)
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  16. Degeneration of Associated Life: Dewey's Naturalism About Social Criticism.Arvi Särkelä - 2017 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 53 (1):107.
    A striking feature of John Dewey’s philosophical attitude in his later period is that for self-description, he did not prefer the term “pragmatism.” Instead, he employed such isms as “experimentalism” and “naturalism.” In the period in which he moved towards developing his own original philosophy, he even stated that “I reject root and branch to the term ‘pragmatism.’”1 As he was at the time drawn to naturalism, it might be revealing indeed that he rejects “root and branch” to “pragmatism.” Also (...)
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  17. Dominant Patterns in Associated Living: Hegemony, Domination, and Ideological Recognition in Dewey's Lectures in China.Italo Testa - 2017 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 53 (1):29.
    In this paper I will focus on the notion of “dominant patterns”, as revealed by the recently discovered typescript of what we can assume to be Dewey’s fragmentary and incomplete preliminary lectures notes for the Lecture Series on Social and Political Philosophy.1 I will show that the way the notion of “dominant patterns” is dealt with in the text of the lectures notes is not only consistent with the conceptual content of the whole series of the Lectures in China as (...)
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  18. Peirce and the Conduct of Life: Sentiment and Instinct in Ethics and Religion by Richard Kenneth Atkins.Wilson Aaron - 2017 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 53 (1):146-152.
    The heart of Richard Kenneth Atkins’s Peirce and the Conduct of Life: Sentiment and Instinct in Ethics and Religion is an interpretation and defense of Peirce’s sentimental conservatism, as well as an extension of that idea to Peirce’s philosophy of religion and to the casuistic approach to practical ethics. “A Defense of Peirce’s Sentimental Conservatism” is the explicit title of the second of the book’s six chapters. But the only chapter in which Peirce’s sentimental conservatism does not itself appear to (...)
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  19.  1
    Articulating a Sense of Powers: An Expressivist Reading of John Dewey's Theory of Social Movements.Justo Serrano Zamora - 2017 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 53 (1):53.
    In the series of lectures he delivered during the two years he spent in China, John Dewey provided the most complete version of his theory of social conflict and struggle. The two textual sources from this time we have at our disposal – the doubly translated lectures published in Honolulu2 and Dewey’s original notes recently published under the name of Lectures in Social and Political Philosophy 3 – outline an original understanding of social conflict as taking place between groups with (...)
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