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  1. Adorno, Foucault and the Critique of the West: By Deborah Cook, London, Verso, 2018, 180 P., £19.99/$29.95/$39.95can (Hardback), ISBN 978-1-78873-082-2.Antoine Athanassiadis - 2020 - Critical Horizons 21 (1):85-88.
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  2.  4
    A Method of Mobility: Dialectical Critique and the Work of Concepts.Rodrigo Cordero - 2020 - Critical Horizons 21 (1):1-16.
    ABSTRACTThis article discusses dialectics as a method of critique which takes concepts it primal object of inquiry. Through a reading of Theodor W. Adorno’s lecture course Introduction to Dialectics, it argues that for dialectical critique concepts are living organs of social reality whose work must observed in terms of constellations of experiences and practices, and through specific historical sites and social processes. The article reconstructs three moments in Adorno’s thinking of critique’s relation to conceptuality: the “pedagogical effect” of concepts on (...)
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  3.  2
    Critique as Social Practice. Critical Theory and Social Self-Understanding: By Robin Celikates, Translated by Naomi van Steenbergen, London and New York, Rowman and Littlefield, 2018, 238 Pp., £80.00 (Hardback), £24.95 (Paperback), ISBN: 978-178660-462-0.Jean-Philippe Deranty - 2020 - Critical Horizons 21 (1):80-85.
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  4.  7
    Althusser, Feuerbach and the Non-Identical Concept of the Body.Michael Hauser - 2020 - Critical Horizons 21 (1):49-62.
    ABSTRACTThis article begins with a detailed analysis of Althusser's criticism of Feuerbach as an “ideologue” of the body. Althusser concentrates on the mirror structure of the subject and the object and on empiricism, which represents the ideological discourse. I argue that Althusser overlooked Feuerbach's decisive revelations: a bodily materiality which corresponds to Adorno's non-identical inner nature, and the ontological condensation of the human being; a process which generates the “living reality” of the body. I show Feuerbach's breakthrough reinterpretation of the (...)
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  5.  74
    Levinas Between Recognition and Heterology.Terence Holden - 2020 - Critical Horizons 21 (1):17-33.
    ABSTRACTI extract a problematic from Levinas’ shifting attitude towards the idea of recognition. An underappreciated aspect of Levinas’ work is that at an early stage he appeals to a recognition-based model of intersubjectivity, which characteristically plots a relation of mutual affirmation between individuals. However, he later explicitly rejects this paradigm in favour of an intensified heterological orientation which invests in otherness as a value in itself. Levinas’ rejection of recognition raises the question of how we are to interpret the relation (...)
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  6.  4
    Claudia Leeb’s The Politics of Repressed Guilt: The Tragedy of Austrian Silence with David W. McIvor, Lars Rensmann, and Claudia Leeb.Claudia Leeb, David W. McIvor & Lars Rensmann - 2020 - Critical Horizons 21 (1):63-79.
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  7.  2
    Beyond Redistribution: Honneth, Recognition Theory and Global Justice.Renante D. Pilapil - 2020 - Critical Horizons 21 (1):34-48.
    ABSTRACTThis paper attempts to explore the ways through which the discourse on global justice can be expanded beyond the language of redistribution by utilizing the insights from the theory of recognition as proposed by Honneth. It looks into the potential contributions of recognition theory in the normative analysis of global poverty and inequality. Taking off from the argument that the focus on global redistributive justice is misleading, the paper makes three claims: firstly, any global justice discourse must take as its (...)
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