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  1.  2
    From Categories to Existentialia: The Programmed Destruction of Philosophy.Emmanuel Faye - 2018 - Critical Horizons 19 (4):274-291.
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  2.  4
    Heidegger on Machination, the Jewish Race, and the Holocaust.Johannes Fritsche - 2018 - Critical Horizons 19 (4):312-333.
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  3.  9
    Beyond the Human: Heidegger’s Self-Interpretation of Being and Time in the Black Notebooks.Gaëtan Pégny - 2018 - Critical Horizons 19 (4):292-311.
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  4.  2
    Heidegger in 2018: Editor-Translator’s Introduction.Matthew Sharpe - 2018 - Critical Horizons 19 (4):271-273.
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  5.  4
    On Reading Heidegger—After the “Heidegger Case”?Matthew Sharpe - 2018 - Critical Horizons 19 (4):334-360.
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  6.  1
    God and Self in Hegel. Beyond Subjectivism.Martin Thibodeau - 2018 - Critical Horizons 19 (4):361-363.
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  7.  3
    Friendship, Recognition and Social Freedom: A Sociological Reconstruction.Harry Blatterer - 2018 - Critical Horizons 19 (3):198-214.
    ABSTRACTIn Freedom’s Right, Axel Honneth articulates the social freedom of friendship with reference to its institutionalised norms. These action norms, however, are not specific to friendship; they apply to modern intimacy per se. Such non-specificity cannot adequately account for the experience of social freedom in friendship. Addressing this issue, I evaluate friendship as a form of recognition and identify a generative recognition deficit functional to its relational autonomy. Then, taking Honneth’s institutional approach to friendship as a point of departure, I (...)
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  8.  4
    Freedom, Equality and Fraternity in Kant’s Critique of Judgement.Agnes Heller - 2018 - Critical Horizons 19 (3):187-197.
    ABSTRACTAt least during his critical period, all of Kant’s philosophical works have a secret political dimension. Among other things, following the analysis of Hannah Arendt, the Critique of Judgment – paragraph 40 in particular – became a main text of political philosophy. In looking at the Critique of Judgement from a political perspective, I shall refer not to paragraph 40 but to the Kantian discussion of pure aesthetic judgement. In my opinion, one can understand Kant’s remarks on aesthetic judgement, and (...)
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  9.  10
    If You’Re a Critical Theorist, How Come You Work for a University?Daniel Loick - 2018 - Critical Horizons 19 (3):233-245.
    ABSTRACTHow can we deal with the apparent contradiction between the normative ideals of critical theory and the practice of the current university system? To answer this question, I consult three classical criticisms of the university system: At the beginning of the nineteenth century, the French educator Joseph Jacotot formulated a pedagogical critique of the disciplinary effects of the educational system; at the beginning of the twentieth century, German historian Franz Rosenzweig articulated an ethical critique of the hegemonic educational system’s distance (...)
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  10.  13
    Brandom on Norms and Objectivity.Leonardo Marchettoni - 2018 - Critical Horizons 19 (3):215-232.
    ABSTRACTThe aim of this paper is to investigate Brandom’s conception of the objectivity of norms. In Making It Explicit Brandom supports a weak notion of objectivity based on his understanding of the perspectival structure of linguistic practices. In his following works, he resorts to the Hegelian notion of recognition, adding a historical dimension to his account. I contend that this notion of objectivity can be successfully defended against the objections raised by the commentators. In particular, it does not jeopardise the (...)
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  11.  1
    Art, Politics and Rancière: Broken Perceptions.Scott Robinson - 2018 - Critical Horizons 19 (3):264-269.
  12.  2
    Policing Academics: The Arkhè of Transformation in Academic Ranking.John Welsh - 2018 - Critical Horizons 19 (3):246-263.
    ABSTRACTThis article attempts a properly critical and political analysis of the “police power” immanent to the form and logic of academic rankings, and which is reproduced in the extant academic literature generated around them. In contrast to the democratising claims made of rankings, this police power short-circuits the moment of democratic politics and establishes the basis for the oligarchic power of the State and its status quo. Central in this founding political moment is the notion of the Arkhè, a necessarily (...)
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  13.  6
    New Directions for a Critical Theory of Work: Reading Honneth Through Deranty.Timothy Boston - 2018 - Critical Horizons 19 (2):111-124.
  14.  9
    Tricking Posthumanism: From Deleuze to to Haraway.Jacob W. Glazier - 2018 - Critical Horizons 19 (2):173-185.
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  15.  3
    The Historico-Poetic Materialism of Benjamin and Celan.Shannon Hayes - 2018 - Critical Horizons 19 (2):125-139.
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  16.  5
    Destruction, Narrative and the Excess of Uniqueness: Reading Cavarero on Violence and Narration.Timothy J. Huzar - 2018 - Critical Horizons 19 (2):157-172.
    In this article, I critically engage Adriana Cavarero’s account of uniqueness via an analysis of her work on narrativity and violence. I suggest there is an ambivalence in Cavarero’s account of uniqueness: Cavarero argues both that uniqueness is susceptible to destruction, and that it cannot finally be annihilated. To make this clear I use Cavarero’s account to read a narrative offered by Miklós Nyiszli, of a woman who survived an Auschwitz gas chamber. I contrast this to Cavarero’s reading of Eurydice (...)
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  17.  5
    Secularism Vs. Post-Secularism: A Critical Examination of Cooke’s Post-Secular Alternative.Kurt C. M. Mertel - 2018 - Critical Horizons 19 (2):93-110.
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  18.  7
    “The Mother of Reason and Revelation”: Benjamin on the Metaphysics of Language.Alexander Stern - 2018 - Critical Horizons 19 (2):140-156.
    This paper is a reconstruction of Walter Benjamin's philosophy of language, especially as it expressed in 1916's “On Language as Such and the Language of Man”. I read Benjamin's theory as a contribution to what Charles Taylor has called the “expressivist” tradition that includes eighteenth century thinkers like J.G. Herder and J.G. Hamann. Hamann's work and his interpretation of the theological concept of condescension are of particular importance. Although Benjamin's views are often regarded as impenetrable or mystical, they are relevant (...)
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  19.  14
    The Ambiguity of Love: Beauvoir, Honneth and Arendt on the Relation Between Recognition, Power and Violence.Federica Gregoratto - 2018 - Critical Horizons 19 (1):18-34.
    The paper sketches out an account of ambiguous and agonistic love by drawing on the work of Simone de Beauvoir, Axel Honneth and Hannah Arendt. To begin with, I reconstruct the ambiguity of love within the conceptual framework of a paradigm of recognition. I argue further that the social relation of love, understood as an intertwine between dependence and independence, entails a power dynamic. Insofar as the dynamic actualises as “power in concert” or “power with”, namely as mutual empowerment, love (...)
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  20.  2
    Deliberation and Forgiveness in the Public Sphere.Ejvind Hansen - 2018 - Critical Horizons 19 (1):49-66.
    A common objection to the argument for deliberative democracy is that it cannot provide mechanisms for achieving its ideal of all-inclusiveness. This does, however, not in itself refute the deliberative ideal. In a reading of Hannah Arendt and Jacques Derrida’s writings on forgiveness, we argue that forgiving involves a renegotiation of our enemies and of ourselves. Hereby a renegotiation of the seemingly unbridgeable understandings of who our enemies are can be achieved. Forgiving involves a realisation that we have something in (...)
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  21.  9
    Feminism as Critique in a Neoliberal Age: Debating Nancy Fraser.Pauline Johnson - 2018 - Critical Horizons 19 (1):1-17.
    Neoliberalism, we are told, has “seduced” feminism. What is meant is that the libertarian and democratic hopes that have scoped this radical social movement have been reconfigured and re-energised by neoliberal project that models all our freedoms upon the market. Misgivings about “seductions” and “betrayals” require that feminist theory adopts the role of the arbiter on goals and meanings and this puts strains upon its deep commitment to democratic epistemologies. The following paper finds that the leading theorist of feminism as (...)
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  22.  8
    Die Philosophie des Marktes/The Philosophy of the Market. [REVIEW]Hannes Kuch - 2018 - Critical Horizons 19 (1):81-83.
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  23.  2
    Maurice Blanchot: Modernism, Dissidence and the Privilege of Writing.Anat Matar - 2018 - Critical Horizons 19 (1):67-80.
    The article links Blanchot’s philosophical and political ideas. Embarking from his recurrent dialogue with Wittgenstein’s Tractatus, it traces the development of Blanchot’s “dissident” version of modernism and his notion of “writing”, alongside his post-war political involvement and writing. I argue that Blanchot never relinquished the purist modernist idea of the privilege of writing and with it the privilege of his own self-identification primarily as a writer. It is my contention that this emphasis sometimes obfuscated his vision, both conceptually and politically. (...)
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  24.  6
    Political Ambivalence as Praxis: The Limits of Consensus in Habermas's Theory of the Public Sphere.Jordan McKenzie - 2018 - Critical Horizons 19 (1):35-48.
    This paper argues that ambivalence can serve as a proxy for consensus-based debates in public discourse as it allows for individuals to maintain flexible and analytic perspectives on matters that otherwise appear contradictory. In particular, an affirmative understanding of ambivalence will be presented to supplement the highly influential Habermasian approach by drawing from sociological theories of ambivalence found in the work of Simmel, Bauman and Kołakowski. While the theme of ambivalence is not completely absent from Habermas’s work on the public (...)
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  25.  5
    Walter Benjamin’s Concept of the Image. [REVIEW]Paula Schwebel - 2018 - Critical Horizons 19 (1):83-91.
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