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  1.  6
    Freedom, Normativity, and Concepts: Adorno Contra Brandom on the Path From Kant.Samuel Ferns - 2022 - Critical Horizons 23 (1):55-77.
    ABSTRACT Robert Brandom reads from Kant an account of reasoning and concept use centred upon normativity and autonomous freedom in the act of judgement. I claim that this reading is flawed because it screens from view another aspect of Kant’s reflections on freedom and reason. By comparing Brandom’s interpretation of Kant with that of Theodor W. Adorno, highlighting their contrasting views of the relation between transcendental and empirical, I contend that Brandom unduly conflates freedom and normativity and thereby takes the (...)
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  2. Freedom as a Matter of Resistance in the Philosophy of Schelling.Daniele Fulvi - 2022 - Critical Horizons 23 (1):78-92.
    ABSTRACT In this paper, I demonstrate that the concept of resistance is fundamental in order to understand Schelling’s account of freedom. First, I argue that Schelling, in his early works, contends that the resistance opposed by nature to our individual will is fundamental for human beings to actualise freedom. Moreover, I show that Schelling maintains the centrality of resistance even in his philosophy of nature, and I demonstrate that resistance is that fundamental ontological occurrence which grounds the opposition between the (...)
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  3.  2
    Immanent Critique in Thucydides’ Mytilenean Debate and Melian Dialogue.Otto Linderborg - 2022 - Critical Horizons 23 (1):44-54.
    ABSTRACT This article investigates social critique in Thucydides’ History of the Peloponnesian War. Two famous Thucydidean episodes are in focus: the Mytilenean Debate in Book III and the Melian Dialogue in Book V of the History. These episodes are interpreted here as inquiries assuming the shape of subversive and transformative social criticism: immanent critique. Immanent critique aims at shifting horizons of meaning in social contexts, and the philosophers practicing this kind of social criticism understand themselves as physicians of a failing (...)
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  4. Immanuel Kant’s Monograms of the Imagination.Peter Murphy - 2022 - Critical Horizons 23 (1):93-109.
    ABSTRACT John Rundell’s Kant explores the themes of imagination, anthropology and freedom across the entire Kantian corpus. The book casts a revealing light on Kant’s conception of the imagination. It does so in a sustained dialogue with Immanuel Kant’s views on the human condition and political and civil freedom. Rundell explores different approaches that Kant employs to account for the imagination. Rundell’s Kant discusses reproductive, productive, synthesising, monogrammatical, schematic, free, wild and sublime forms of imagination and how these are deeply (...)
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  5.  20
    The Conditions of Immanent Critique.Alexei Procyshyn - 2022 - Critical Horizons 23 (1):22-43.
    ABSTRACT This article contributes to methodological debates in contemporary critical theory regarding the scope and features of immanent critique. I spell out the philosophical commitments presupposed by this approach to criticism and identify its basic features by comparing it with more recognizable argumentative or interpretative strategies. This comparison yields three immanent-critical requirements – for inherence, contradiction, and access – which bring into relief the heuristic and ampliative character of immanent criticism. Yet, these requirements also imply that “immanent critique” is not (...)
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