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  1.  1
    Judaism’s Christianity.Aidler Alexandra - 2017 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 25 (2):232-255.
    _ Source: _Volume 25, Issue 2, pp 232 - 255 In Book III of _The Star of Redemption_, Franz Rosenzweig contrasts Judaism and Christianity: Judaism consists in the eternal passage of a people from creation to revelation; it suspends the divide between God’s presence and his worldly manifestation. For Rosenzweig, being Jewish means to be with God in the world. Christianity, however, defers salvation. While Judaism is with God in the world, Christianity retreats from God and the world. Christianity therefore (...)
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  2. R. Abraham Isaac Kook and the Opening Passage of “The War”.Hanoch Ben-Pazi - 2017 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 25 (2):256-278.
    _ Source: _Volume 25, Issue 2, pp 256 - 278 Rabbi Abraham Isaac Ha-Cohen Kook’s essay “The War” is a text of immense importance with respect to the development of ideological militaristic writing in religious Zionism. The essay was first published in the book _Orot me-Ofel_, edited by R. Kook’s son, Rabbi Zvi Yehudah Kook. In this study, I wish to distinguish the views presented in the notebooks and collected writings of R. Kook from his position as set forth in (...)
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  3. From “Jewish Memory” to Jewish History.Robert Chazan - 2017 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 25 (2):279-304.
    _ Source: _Volume 25, Issue 2, pp 279 - 304 In his influential _Zakhor: Jewish History and Jewish Memory_, Yosef Hayim Yerushalmi analyzed brilliantly the transition in Jewish conceptions of Jewish history from premodern to modern times. The present paper discusses a number of alternative perspectives on this transition. Yerushalmi argued convincingly the importance of the traditional conception of Jewish history, which he labeled “Jewish memory,” for Jewish survival. This paper challenges the terminology, agrees with the role played by the (...)
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  4. Mendelssohn’s Concept of Natural Religion Re-Examined.Haim Mahlev - 2017 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 25 (2):209-231.
    _ Source: _Volume 25, Issue 2, pp 209 - 231 The essay explores Moses Mendelssohn’s concept of natural religion by contrasting it with the way it was understood by his contemporaries. An examination of key aspects—the role of pagans, knowledge transfer, the possible redundancy of revealed religion, and Judaism’s attitude toward “unphilosophical” knowledge—suggests that Mendelssohn’s view was not only shaped through direct and indirect reactions to his intellectual surrounding, but also that it employed Christian arguments in order to construct an (...)
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  5. The Concept of Evil in 4 Maccabees.Hans Moscicke - 2017 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 25 (2):163-195.
    _ Source: _Volume 25, Issue 2, pp 163 - 195 The concept of evil in 4 Maccabees differs from what we find in most ancient Jewish literature, and little attention has been paid to its philosophical background. In this article I submit that the author of 4 Maccabees has absorbed and adapted a Stoic conception of evil into his Jewish philosophy. I trace the concept of evil in Stoicism and in 4 Maccabees using the categories of value theory, natural law, (...)
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  6. Les Fondements Naturels de la Loi Divine Dans L’Œuvre de Rabbi Josef Albo.Shalom Sadik - 2017 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 25 (2):196-208.
    _ Source: _Volume 25, Issue 2, pp 196 - 208 The aim of the article is to analyze the concepts of natural law, political law, and divine law in the thought of Rabbi Josef Albo. The article concludes that according to R. Albo, the true divine law has something natural. Humans can understand by themselves that natural law is not developed enough to assure their needs. They can comprehend as well that only divine law can be a good political law, (...)
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  7. The Hard and the Soft.Samuel Hayim Brody - 2017 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 25 (1):72-94.
    _ Source: _Volume 25, Issue 1, pp 72 - 94 Politics has never been considered Martin Buber’s forte. This paper considers the range of Buber’s reception as a political thinker by considering it in the form of three “moments,” each from a different point in his career, and each through the eyes of a different figure who either read or worked with Buber politically: Theodor Herzl, Gustav Landauer, and Hans Kohn. The three moments are structured around a discussion of the (...)
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  8.  1
    Companionable Being.Gilpin W. Clark - 2017 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 25 (1):59-71.
    _ Source: _Volume 25, Issue 1, pp 59 - 71 American religious thinkers of the mid-twentieth century regularly included appreciative comments about Martin Buber’s thought in their books and essays, but they seldom stated specifically what they were drawing from Buber. Their comments did, however, tend to circle around a single issue: modern social, political, and technological changes were destabilizing both the sense of “the uniqueness of human selfhood” and the possibility of its distinctively “religious existence.” They sought a third (...)
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  9.  1
    Martin Buber and the Problem of Dialogue in Contemporary Thought.Hans Joas - 2017 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 25 (1):105-109.
    _ Source: _Volume 25, Issue 1, pp 105 - 109 This paper asks two questions: Who in the history of ideas were the main initiators of dialogical thinking? What are Martin Buber’s main merits in this regard? It comes to the conclusion that Buber’s main achievement was his understanding of the performative character of statements about the personhood of God. His dialogical understanding of religious experience is in need of being synthesized with an empirically grounded understanding of human intersubjectivity as (...)
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  10.  4
    Martin Buber’s Socialism.Michael Löwy - 2017 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 25 (1):95-104.
    _ Source: _Volume 25, Issue 1, pp 95 - 104 Martin Buber was a creative and heterodox socialist thinker. His socialist utopia was based on the idea of a new community that does not hark back to ancient forms, but wants to overcome modern society while incorporating its achievements, such as the principle of individual freedom. It is not bound, like the old _Gemeinschaft_—the tribe, the clan, the religious sect—by one single word or opinion that soon freezes into dogma and (...)
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  11.  2
    Defining Christianity and Judaism From the Perspective of Religious Anarchy.Shaul Magid - 2017 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 25 (1):36-58.
    _ Source: _Volume 25, Issue 1, pp 36 - 58 This essay explores Martin Buber’s rendering of Jesus and the Ba‘al Shem Tov as two exemplars of religious anarchism that create a lens through which to see the symmetry between Judaism and Christianity. The essay argues that Buber’s use of Jesus to construct his view of the Ba‘al Shem Tov enables us to revisit the “parting of the ways” between Judaism and Christianity through the category of the religious anarchist.
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  12.  1
    From Genius to Taste.Sarah Scott - 2017 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 25 (1):110-130.
    _ Source: _Volume 25, Issue 1, pp 110 - 130 I reconstruct the aestheticism of Martin Buber in order to provide a new way of framing his moral philosophy and development as a thinker. The evolution of Buber’s thought does not entail a shift from aesthetics to ethics, but a shift from one aspect of aesthetics to another, namely, from taking _genius_ to be key to social renewal, to taking _ _taste_ _ to be key. I draw on Kantian aesthetics (...)
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  13. Sacramental Existence and Embodied Theology in Buber’s Representation of Ḥasidism.Sam Berrin Shonkoff - 2017 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 25 (1):131-161.
    _ Source: _Volume 25, Issue 1, pp 131 - 161 Martin Buber denied consistently that he was a theologian because he repudiated abstract discourse about God. However, he did affirm that intersubjective events in the world express theological truth, even if that truth cannot be possessed or professed thereafter as noetic content. In this paper I introduce a concept of “embodied theology” to elucidate this nuance in Buber’s religious thought, and I show how his Ḥasidic writings shed unique light on (...)
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  14. Preface.Sam Berrin Shonkoff & Paul Mendes-Flohr - 2017 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 25 (1):1-3.
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  15.  2
    Theolatry and the Making-Present of the Nonrepresentable.Elliot R. Wolfson - 2017 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 25 (1):5-35.
    _ Source: _Volume 25, Issue 1, pp 5 - 35 In this essay, I place Buber’s thought in dialogue with Eckhart. Each understood that the theopoetic propensity to imagine the transcendent in images is no more than a projection of our will to impute form to the formless. The presence of God is made present through imaging the real, but imaging the real implies that the nonrepresentable presence can only be made present through the absence of representation. The goal of (...)
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