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  1. Post-Holocaust Jewish Aniconism and the Theological Significance of Barnett Newman’s Stations of the Cross.Christopher M. Cuthill - 2018 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 26 (1):118-147.
    _ Source: _Volume 26, Issue 1, pp 118 - 147 This paper challenges the widespread emphasis on the absence of God in post- Holocaust historiography, theology, and art by suggesting that Barnett Newman’s _Stations of the Cross_ may have been conceived under the theological category of the apophatic rather than the aesthetic category of the sublime. This paper focuses on the “anti-realist” position of Newman and other artists for whom the Holocaust necessitated a renewed aniconic tendency in Jewish aesthetics. His (...)
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  2. The Sefer as a Challenge to Reception Theories.Iddo Dickmann - 2018 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 26 (1):67-93.
    _ Source: _Volume 26, Issue 1, pp 67 - 93 The talmudic sages granted the legal status of _sefer_ to five texts: the Torah, _tefillin_, the _get_, the _mezuzah_, and the Scroll of Esther. These texts share two features: they have a ritualistic format and use, and they are the only sacred texts that demonstrate _mise en abyme_—the trait of literary self-containing. These two traits turn the rabbinic book into a radical case of “open work”: the _sefer_ consists of both (...)
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    Revealing What’s Implicit.Paul E. Nahme - 2018 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 26 (1):1-33.
    _ Source: _Volume 26, Issue 1, pp 1 - 33 This article reinterprets Maimonides’ theory of creation and revelation by focusing upon the relationship between belief in creation and the affirmation of miracle and law described in _Guide_ II :25. Focusing upon Maimonides’ use of inference to describe creation and revelation, I re-evaluate Maimonides’ account as an instance of inferential reasoning. That is, Maimonides makes use of, rather than proves, the _implicit_ norms of creation and revelation in their _explicit_ function (...)
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  4. A Community Should Be Present as He Prays so That He Can Bind Himself with Their Soul.Moshe Goultschin - 2018 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 26 (1):34-66.
    _ Source: _Volume 26, Issue 1, pp 34 - 66 During his final years, R. Nahman of Bratslav endeavored to find a solution for the paradox of unrealized messiahs. His solution was outlined in his dream about birds in December 1806, on the Sabbath of _Parashat Va-yeḥi_. This dream was influenced by his reading of a story told in the _Zohar, Parashat Va-yeḥi_, of a “vision of birds” of R. Yehudah, a disciple of R. Shimon bar Yohai, that exemplifies the (...)
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  5. God, Being, Pathos.Daniel Herskowitz - 2018 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 26 (1):94-117.
    _ Source: _Volume 26, Issue 1, pp 94 - 117 Martin Heidegger’s philosophy has elicited many theological responses; some enthusiastic, others critical. In this essay I provide an organized and critical analysis of Abraham Joshua Heschel’s theological critique of and rejoinder to the thought of the German philosopher. By looking at Heschel’s 1965 _Who is Man?_ as well as earlier and later texts, I demonstrate the way in which Heschel presents his biblical theology as an alternative to Heidegger’s philosophy.
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