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  1.  14
    What God Does Not Possess: Moses Mendelssohn’s Philosophy of Imperfection.Dustin Noah Atlas - 2019 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 27 (1):26-59.
    This paper proposes that Moses Mendelssohn’s Morning Hours be viewed as the final chapter in a philosophy of imperfection that Mendelssohn had been developing over the course of his life. It is further argued that this philosophy of imperfection is still of philosophical interest. After demonstrating that the concept of imperfection animates Mendelssohn’s early work, this paper turns towards the specific arguments about imperfection Mendelssohn made in the midst of the pantheism controversy—in particular, the claim that human imperfection attests to (...)
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  2.  13
    Pragmatism and Jewish Thought: Eliezer Berkovits’s Philosophy of Halakhic Fallibility.Nadav Berman Shifman - 2019 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 27 (1):86-135.
    In classical American pragmatism, fallibilism refers to the conception of truth as an ongoing process of improving human knowledge that is nevertheless susceptible to error. This paper traces appearances of fallibilism in Jewish thought in general, and particularly in the halakhic thought of Eliezer Berkovits. Berkovits recognizes the human condition’s persistent mutability, which he sees as characterizing the ongoing effort to interpret and apply halakhah in shifting historical and social contexts as Torat Ḥayyim. In the conclusion of the article, broader (...)
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  3.  8
    The “And” of History: Thinking Side by Side in Rosenzweig’s Imagination of Eternity.Asher D. Biemann - 2019 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 27 (1):60-85.
    Franz Rosenzweig’s Star of Redemption culminates in an aesthetic configuration of simultaneous presences: world, man, God, creation, revelation, and redemption are viewed in a metahistorical side-by-side, connected by the “factualizing power of the And.” But the idea of simultaneity, which is central to Rosenzweig’s configurative thinking, belongs to the historical imagination as much as it belongs to the theological “breaking through the shackles of time.” Rosenzweig’s “and” belongs to both a tradition of cosmic-aesthetic historicism and the philosophical reconstitution of time (...)
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  4.  4
    Martin Buber’s View of Biblical Leadership and His View of the Eternal Thou.S. Daniel Breslauer - 2019 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 27 (1):1-25.
    Recent studies have renewed focus on Martin Buber’s “theopolitics” in contrast to “theological politics.” The present study expands this work by looking at what Buber meant by God. His approach to the Bible, informed by his view that “extended, the lines of relationship meet in the Eternal Thou,” illuminates his analysis of the five types of biblical leadership. That analysis, far from separating “religion” and “politics,” seemed to assume what might be designated a civil religion. The social order was integrated (...)
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