Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

ISSNs: 1053-699X, 1477-285X

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  1.  10
    The Sum of All Fears: the Figure of the Anti/Metaphysical Jew in Heidegger’s Black Notebooks (and beyond).Agata Bielik-Robson - 2024 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 32 (1):35-59.
    My essay positions Heidegger’s Black Notebooks (Schwarze Hefte) in the light of the later transformation of his thought after die Kehre, which introduces a new motif: “the withdrawal of Being.” And while the Jewish question disappears from his official discourse, the essay poses it nonetheless, despite and against Heidegger’s silence: Does the diagnosis from the Black Notebooks, which perceives the Jew as the agent of metaphysical destruction, still stand? In my analysis, the figurative Jew emerges in a role which Heidegger (...)
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  2.  21
    Gagarin Sixty Years Later: Earth and Place after Heidegger and Levinas.Arthur Cools - 2024 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 32 (1):156-175.
    In this article I re-examine the well-known distinction between rootedness and uprootedness that Emmanuel Levinas draws in his short text “Heidegger, Gagarin and Us” (1961). This distinction addresses the relation between men and place either as an attachment to place (paganism, Heidegger) or as a freedom with regard to place (Judaism, Gagarin). I question this opposition from a contemporary perspective in environmental philosophy, namely from the growing awareness of the interconnectedness between place and Earth. I contend that this new perspective (...)
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  3.  7
    Elective Affinity: the Geist of Israel in Heidegger’s Free Use of the German National.Michael Fagenblat - 2024 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 32 (1):176-223.
    This article examines the way Heidegger’s account of the unique spiritual mission of the German people is haunted by certain conceptions of the election of Israel. I argue that Heidegger’s political ontology is informed by three conceptions of the mission of Israel: biblical salvation history, kabbalistic panentheism, and Germany literary Hebraism. To link these disparate historical phenomena to Heidegger’s account of the mission of being German, I develop a methodological approach for understanding Heidegger’s “free use of the national” that accounts (...)
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  4. Variations on a Theme: Heidegger and Judaism.Daniel M. Herskowitz - 2024 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 32 (1):8-34.
    This essay surveys a number of prominent, recurring, and new directions in the growing scholarly discourse on the theme “Heidegger and Judaism” arranged under three headings. The first, the contrastive framing, encompasses cases in which the relationship between Heidegger and Judaism is perceived as antithetical. The second, the conjunctive framing, encompasses views claiming the existence of affinities and parallels between Heidegger and Judaism, grouped under three subheadings: “Heidegger and biblical thinking,” “Heidegger and Kabbalah,” and “Heidegger and the Jewish nation.” The (...)
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  5.  16
    Hermeneutics before Ontology: How Later Levinas Better Understands Heidegger.Elad Lapidot - 2024 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 32 (1):133-155.
    This paper examines Emmanuel Levinas’s philosophical development from Totality and Infinity to Otherwise than Being as a self-critique and revised understanding of Martin Heidegger. It focuses on later Levinas’s analysis of language in terms of the difference between Saying and Said. For Levinas, the Said represents the betrayal of ethical Saying into ontological essence. This echoes Heidegger’s notion of the forgetfulness of Being in beings. However, Levinas critiques Heidegger’s own philosophy as remaining within the Said. The paper explores three strategies (...)
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  6.  8
    Introduction.Vivian Liska - 2024 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 32 (1):1-7.
  7.  10
    History of Error: Jacob Taubes’s Apocalyptic Interpretation of Martin Heidegger’s Vom Wesen der Wahrheit.Willem Styfhals - 2024 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 32 (1):60-82.
    Through a close reading of the opening pages of Occidental Eschatology, this paper analyzes how Jacob Taubes relied on Martin Heidegger’s philosophy to understand the nature of eschatology. Taubes implemented Heidegger’s notions of truth, error, and history from his seminal essay “On the Essence of Truth,” (mis)interpreting the essay by ascribing an eschatological meaning to it. This surprisingly allowed him to find in Heidegger a model to come to terms with the Jewish experience of history. In order to fully understand (...)
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  8.  15
    Brokenness of Being and Errancy of Ontological Untruth: Susan Taubes’s Criticism of Heidegger’s Seinsdenken.Elliot R. Wolfson - 2024 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 32 (1):83-132.
    In this study, I examine Susan Taubes’s criticism of Heidegger’s Seinsdenken that pivots around her contention that he absolutized the nothingness of being in a manner that is analogous to but yet significantly different than the role assigned to the Godhead on the part of many mystical visionaries. The common denominator is in Heidegger’s insistence on being to the neglect of fully engaging with the rhythms of life. As a consequence, there is no purchase on the chaotic, which falls outside (...)
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