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  1.  3
    On Debt and Redemption: Friedrich Nietzsche's Doctrine of Eternal Recurrence.Michael Allen Gillespie - 2018 - Journal of Religious Ethics 46 (2):267-287.
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  2. The Axes of Debt: A Preface to Three Essays.Luke Bretherton & Devin Singh - 2018 - Journal of Religious Ethics 46 (2):207-216.
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  3.  2
    The Price of Charity: Christian Love and Financial Anxieties.Sean Capener - 2018 - Journal of Religious Ethics 46 (2):217-238.
    Love and money, according to the intuitive logic of Christian political theology, stand in opposition to each other. Where economic relations obtain, relations of love are understood to be absent or distorted. The opposition between the two has led social theorists and political theologians—including John Milbank, Kathryn Tanner, and Daniel M. Bell—to understand Christian love as a reservoir of opposition to the politics of contemporary financialized capital. This opposition, however, ignores the complex interrelationship that has characterized Christian thought about love (...)
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  4.  3
    Frontier Kantianism: Autonomy and Authority in Ralph Waldo Emerson and Joseph Smith.Ryan W. Davis - 2018 - Journal of Religious Ethics 46 (2):332-359.
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  5.  10
    Francisco de Vitoria and Francisco Suárez on Religious Authority and Cause for Justified War: The Centrality of Religious War in the Christian Just War Tradition.Melvin Endy - 2018 - Journal of Religious Ethics 46 (2):289-331.
  6. Beyond Consumptive Solidarity: An Aesthetic Response to Human Trafficking.Nichole Flores - 2018 - Journal of Religious Ethics 46 (2):360-377.
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  7.  3
    Religion and the Human Rights Idea.James Turner Johnson - 2018 - Journal of Religious Ethics 46 (2):379-398.
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  8.  4
    Sovereign Debt.Devin Singh - 2018 - Journal of Religious Ethics 46 (2):239-266.
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  9.  14
    Virtue and the Good Life in the Early Confucian Tradition.Youngsun Back - 2018 - Journal of Religious Ethics 46 (1):37-62.
    This essay examines the role of virtue and the status of non-moral goods in conceptions of the good human life through an exploration of the thought of Confucius and Mencius. Both Confucius and Mencius lived in quite similar worlds, but their conceptualizations of the world differed from each another. This difference led them to hold different views on the role of virtue and the status of non-moral goods. On the one hand, Confucius highlighted the self-sufficiency of virtue, but he acknowledged (...)
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  10.  5
    Prophecy, Ethical Constraints, and Unjust Silence.Alda Balthrop‐Lewis - 2018 - Journal of Religious Ethics 46 (1):157-166.
    Cathleen Kaveny's Prophecy Without Contempt seeks to reorient the conversation among religious ethicists and political theorists about religion in public life. Rather than focus on religious speech in general, Kaveny distinguishes deliberation and indictment as forms of discourse, and she subjects indictment to ethical evaluation. She aims to constrain the public exercise of inordinate indictment, while encouraging prophetic indictment that meets the demands of justice. While the book is a much-needed corrective, Kaveny's focus on the powerful rhetoric of prophetic indictment (...)
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  11.  7
    Prophecy Without Contempt: Metaphors, Imagination, and Evaluative Criteria.James F. Childress - 2018 - Journal of Religious Ethics 46 (1):167-172.
    While greatly appreciative of Kaveny's important study of a neglected form of religious/moral discourse in the public square, this essay critically examines her metaphors for prophetic indictments and finds the metaphor of moral chemotherapy particularly problematic and the metaphor of warfare, connected with the just-war tradition, more promising. It stresses the difficulty, if not the impossibility, of avoiding contempt in prophetic indictments, as Kaveny conceives them, and finds her proposed solutions to this problem—standing with the people and expressing empathy and (...)
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  12.  16
    Pierre Hadot on Habit, Reason, and Spiritual Exercises.Daniel del Nido - 2018 - Journal of Religious Ethics 46 (1):7-36.
    This essay is a reappraisal of Pierre Hadot's concept of spiritual exercises in response to recent criticisms of his work. The author argues that contrary to the claims of his critics, Hadot articulates a compelling argument that spiritual exercises that employ imaginative, rhetorical, and cognitive techniques are both necessary for and successful at producing a subject in which reason is integrated into human character. Such exercises are critical for overcoming the effects of habit, as a result of which everyday conduct (...)
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  13.  5
    Debate, Prophecy, and Revolution: Notes on Cathleen Kaveny's Prophecy Without Contempt.William David Hart - 2018 - Journal of Religious Ethics 46 (1):173-180.
    In Prophecy without Contempt, Cathleen Kaveny argues that prevailing scholarly approaches to religious and public discourse misunderstand the actual complexity of moral rhetoric in America. She endeavors to provide a better account through study of the role the Puritan jeremiad has played. Kaveny then offers a normative case for deliberative public moral discourse and the limited exercise of prophetic denunciation. I argue that Kaveny's distinction between deliberation and prophetic denunciation is overdrawn. They are ideal types that elide other rhetorical forms. (...)
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  14.  5
    Response to Critics.Cathleen Kaveny - 2018 - Journal of Religious Ethics 46 (1):190-200.
    In this “Response to Critics,” Cathleen Kaveny continues the conversation in the JRE symposium centered on her recent book, Prophecy without Contempt: Religious Discourse in the Public Square. The book's central argument is that adequate discussion of contention in the contemporary public square requires attending to matters of rhetoric, particularly the rhetoric of prophetic indictment. Kaveny engages the comments of four interlocutors: Alda Balthrop-Lewis, James Childress, William Hart, and Martin Kavka. The first section, “Overarching Goals,” summarizes the objectives of the (...)
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  15.  5
    What Does a Prophet Know?Martin Kavka - 2018 - Journal of Religious Ethics 46 (1):181-189.
    This essay on Cathleen Kaveny's Prophecy Without Contempt challenges her argument from two opposing sides. First, it critiques all jeremiads. It asks how a person uttering prophetic indictments, whether in the form of a classical jeremiad or the more moderate form that Kaveny argues for, can possibly know of what she speaks, given the otherness of God. Second, it calls for more jeremiads. It asks whether a person, whether religious or not, might indeed know enough to offer withering jeremiads, in (...)
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  16.  5
    The Uncanny Self in Love: Divorced Catholic Women Remember Abortion in Romania.Marc Roscoe Loustau - 2018 - Journal of Religious Ethics 46 (1):63-87.
    This essay presents an ethnographic account of two divorced Catholic women's memories of praying to the Virgin Mary while seeking illegal abortions under the Romanian socialist regime. These women's stories focused on troubling memories of being in love, reflections that were retrospectively shaped by divorce. Drawing on Sigmund Freud's notion of the uncanny, I call these recollections uncanny memories of the self in love. Uncannily remembering one's self in love combines experiential self-examination and ethical assessment of actions. The notion of (...)
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  17.  7
    A Theory of Providence for Distributive Justice.Shlomo Dov Rosen - 2018 - Journal of Religious Ethics 46 (1):124-155.
    Distributive justice assumes a morally critical judgment of nature, which typically contradicts providential conceptions. Hence, simple conceptions of divine Providence cannot support distributive justice. This essay analyzes and develops a complex strand of theorizing about Providence within Jewish philosophy that is compatible with distributive justice. According to this conception, the actions of divine Providence express different and mutually exclusive considerations of justice. Therefore, the moral value of outcomes is intransitive between the situations of different people. And while each providential action (...)
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  18.  6
    Maya Moral and Ritual Discourse: Dialogical Groundings for Consuetudinary Law.Garry Sparks - 2018 - Journal of Religious Ethics 46 (1):88-123.
    Toward the end of the twentieth century, Highland Maya intellectuals and activists in Guatemala began to argue for the recognition of indigenous customary law, rooted in traditional Maya moral and ritual discourse. Such law is often in tension with the Western notion of rights that undergirds national and international treatises regarding indigenous peoples. This essay identifies three distinct but mutually engaged pairs of moral concepts—hot/cold, left/right, and favorable/not favorable—articulated through K'iche' Maya quotidian and ceremonial practices and speech. It also identifies (...)
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