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  1.  25
    Civil Dialogue on Abortion. [REVIEW]Bruce Philip Blackshaw - 2019 - The New Bioethics 25 (4):377-380.
    Volume 25, Issue 4, December 2019, Page 377-380.
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  2.  3
    Should Long-Term Follow-Up Post-Mitochondrial Replacement Be Left Up to Physicians, Parents, or Offspring?Tetsuya Ishii - 2019 - The New Bioethics 25 (4):318-331.
    UK law permits parents to use mitochondrial replacement to have genetically-related children without serious mitochondrial disease. However, long-term follow-up is required for each case. Whet...
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  3.  5
    Dying Well.David M. Rassam - 2019 - The New Bioethics 25 (4):380-383.
    Volume 25, Issue 4, December 2019, Page 380-383.
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  4.  3
    Donation of Human Biological Materials in the European Union: Commodifying Solidarity in the Era of the Biotechnological Revolution?Luciana Riva, Giorgio Resta, Alberto Gambino & Carlo Petrini - 2019 - The New Bioethics 25 (4):349-358.
    The use of human biological materials involves a number of issues from both an ethical and a legal point of view. In recent decades, the purposes for which this material has been used have i...
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  5.  17
    After God: Morality & Bioethics in a Secular Age.Toni Saad - 2019 - The New Bioethics 25 (4):374-377.
    Volume 25, Issue 4, December 2019, Page 374-377.
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  6.  6
    To Infinity and Beyond?Trevor Stammers - 2019 - The New Bioethics 25 (4):293-294.
    Volume 25, Issue 4, December 2019, Page 293-294.
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  7.  5
    Why Human Enhancement is Necessary for Successful Human Deep-Space Missions.Konrad Szocik & Martin Braddock - 2019 - The New Bioethics 25 (4):295-317.
    While humans have made enormous progress in the exploration and exploitation of Earth, exploration of outer space remains beyond current human capabilities. The principal challenges lie in current...
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  8.  2
    Nazis, Teleology, and the Freedom of Conscience: In Response to Gamble and Pruski’s ‘Medical Acts and Conscientious Objection: What Can a Physician Be Compelled to Do?’.Marcus Wischik - 2019 - The New Bioethics 25 (4):359-373.
    Medical practitioners of all specialisms are identified by their professional titles. Their function is determined by their regulators, and subject to voluntary employment contracts....
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  9.  7
    The Conscience Wars; Rethinking the Balance Between Religion, Identity, and Equality.Christopher Cowley - 2019 - The New Bioethics 25 (3):286-289.
    Volume 25, Issue 3, September 2019, Page 286-289.
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  10.  8
    Selective Conscientious Objection in Healthcare.Christopher Cowley - 2019 - The New Bioethics 25 (3):236-247.
    Most discussions of conscientious objection in healthcare assume that the objection is universal: a doctor objects to all abortions. I want to investigate selective objections, where a doctor objec...
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  11.  8
    Medical Acts and Conscientious Objection: What Can a Physician Be Compelled to Do?Nathan K. Gamble & Michal Pruski - 2019 - The New Bioethics 25 (3):262-282.
    A key question has been underexplored in the literature on conscientious objection: if a physician is required to perform ‘medical activities,’ what is a medical activity? This paper explores the question by employing a teleological evaluation of medicine and examining the analogy of military conscripts, commonly cited in the conscientious objection debate. It argues that physicians (and other healthcare professionals) can only be expected to perform and support medical acts – acts directed towards their patients’ health. That is, physicians cannot (...)
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  12.  2
    Religious Exemptions.Jacqueline Laing - 2019 - The New Bioethics 25 (3):290-292.
    Volume 25, Issue 3, September 2019, Page 290-292.
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  13.  5
    Opting Out. Conscience and Cooperation in a Pluralistic Society.Morten Magelssen - 2019 - The New Bioethics 25 (3):283-286.
    Volume 25, Issue 3, September 2019, Page 283-286.
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  14.  6
    Is Conscientious Objection Incompatible with Healthcare Professionalism?Mary Neal & Sara Fovargue - 2019 - The New Bioethics 25 (3):221-235.
    Is conscientious objection necessarily incompatible with the role and duties of a healthcare professional? An influential minority of writers on the subject think that it is. Here, we outline...
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  15.  2
    Guest Editorial.Mary Neal, Sara Fovargue & Stephen W. Smith - 2019 - The New Bioethics 25 (3):203-206.
    Volume 25, Issue 3, September 2019, Page 203-206.
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  16.  10
    How Special is Medical Conscience?David S. Oderberg - 2019 - The New Bioethics 25 (3):207-220.
    The vigorous legal and ethical debates over conscientious objection have taken place largely within the domain of health care. Is this because conscience in medicine is of a special kind, or are th...
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  17.  3
    Conscientious Objection and Clinical Judgement: The Right to Refuse to Harm.Toni C. Saad - 2019 - The New Bioethics 25 (3):248-261.
    This paper argues that healthcare aims at the good of health, that this pursuit of the good necessitates conscience, and that conscience is required in every practical judgement, including clinical...
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  18. The Problem of Spontaneous Abortion: Is the Pro-Life Position Morally Monstrous?Bruce P. Blackshaw & Daniel Rodger - 2019 - The New Bioethics 25 (2):103-120.
    A substantial proportion of human embryos spontaneously abort soon after conception, and ethicists have argued this is problematic for the pro-life view that a human embryo has the same moral status as an adult from conception. Firstly, if human embryos are our moral equals, this entails spontaneous abortion is one of humanity’s most important problems, and it is claimed this is absurd, and a reductio of the moral status claim. Secondly, it is claimed that pro-life advocates do not act as (...)
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  19.  4
    On the Idea of Person and the Japanese Notion of Ningen and its Relation to Organ Transplantation.Enric Huguet Cañamero - 2019 - The New Bioethics 25 (2):185-198.
    It is not possible to talk about bioethics without recognizing the plurality inherent in it. In this sense, the notion of person is important due to its multiplicity of possible interpretations depending on its cultural context. This fact is highlighted in the case of organ transplantation in Japan. While there are many critiques against this procedure from scholars in various fields, those that deal with the problem of brain death are especially problematic. This is because the definition of person that (...)
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  20.  51
    The Wisdom of Germline Editing: An Ethical Analysis of the Use of CRISPR-Cas9 to Edit Human Embryos.Jennifer M. Gumer - 2019 - The New Bioethics 25 (2):137-152.
    With recent reports that a Chinese scientist used CRISPR-Cas9 to heritably edit the genomes of human embryos brought to term, discussions regarding the ethics of the technology are urgently needed. Although certain applications of germline editing have been endorsed by both the National Academy of Sciences and the Nuffield Council, this paper explores the ethical concerns related even to such therapeutic uses of the technology. Additionally, this paper questions whether the technology could ever feasibly be contained to the therapeutic realm. (...)
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  21.  13
    Genome Modifying Reproductive Procedures and Their Effects on Numerical Identity.Calum MacKellar - 2019 - The New Bioethics 25 (2):121-136.
    The advantages and risks of a number of new genome modifying procedures seeking to create healthy or enhanced individuals, such as Maternal Spindle Transfer, Pronuclear Transfer, Cytoplasmic Transfer and Genome Editing, are currently being assessed from an ethical perspective, by national and international policy organizations. One important aspect being examined concerns the effects of these procedures on different kinds of identity. In other words, whether or not a procedure only modifies the qualities or properties of an existing human being, meaning (...)
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  22.  16
    Towards a Holistic Definition of Death: The Biological, Philosophical and Social Deficiencies of Brain Stem Death Criteria.Abigail Maguire - 2019 - The New Bioethics 25 (2):172-184.
    With no statutory definition of death, the accepted medical definition relies on brain stem death criteria as a definitive measure of diagnosing death. However, the use of brain stem death criteria in this way is precarious and causes widespread confusion amongst both medical and lay communities. Through critical analysis, this paper considers the insufficiencies of brain stem death. It concludes that brain stem death cannot be successfully equated with either biological death or the loss of integrated bodily function. The overemphasis (...)
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  23.  9
    Genethics and Human Reproduction: Religious Perspectives in the Academic Bioethics Literature.Aasim I. Padela & Mariel Kalkach Aparicio - 2019 - The New Bioethics 25 (2):153-171.
    The successes of the human genome project and genomics research programs portend great potential to improve upon health and enhance life. As scientific advancements continue, bioethicists and policy makers deliberate over the social and ethical implications of genetic and genomic technologies and information. The application of ggT/I to human reproduction raises conceptual and moral questions about being human and the links between offspring, parents, and society. Given ggT/I’s ability to significantly affect the biological constitution of humans and future human generations (...)
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  24.  29
    New Lamps for Old?Trevor Stammers - 2019 - The New Bioethics 25 (2):101-102.
    Volume 25, Issue 2, June 2019, Page 101-102.
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  25.  11
    Entering Into Rest: Ethics as Theology, Volume III.John Wyatt - 2019 - The New Bioethics 25 (2):199-201.
    Volume 25, Issue 2, June 2019, Page 199-201.
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  26.  15
    Should Human Rights and Autonomy Be The Primary Determinants for the Disclosure of a Decision to Withhold Futile Resuscitation?Sarah Cahill - 2019 - The New Bioethics 25 (1):39-59.
    Do not attempt cardiopulmonary resuscitation decisions are considered good medical practice for those dying at the end of natural life. They avoid intrusive and inappropriate intervention. Historically, informing patients of these decisions was discretionary to avoid undue distress. Recent legal rulings have altered clinical guidance: disclosure is now all but obligatory. The basis for these legal judgments was respect for the patient’s autonomy as an expression of their human rights. Through critical analysis, this paper explores other bioethical considerations and the (...)
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  27.  10
    Assessing Enhancement Technologies: Authenticity as a Social Virtue and Experiment.Cristian Iftode - 2019 - The New Bioethics 25 (1):24-38.
    This paper argues for a revised concept of authenticity entailing two demands that must be balanced. The first demand moves authenticity from the position of a strictly self-regarding virtue towards the position of a fully social virtue, acknowledging the crucial feature of steadiness, i.e. self-consistency, as being precisely what we ‘naturally’ lack. Nevertheless, the value of personal authenticity in a modern, open society comes from the fact that it brings about not only steadiness, but also the public development of a (...)
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  28.  16
    Surrogacy: Challenges and Ambiguities.Ana Rita Igreja & Miguel Ricou - 2019 - The New Bioethics 25 (1):60-77.
    Surrogacy is an increasingly frequent form of family building and allows individuals to become parents despite an infertility diagnosis or a biological impossibility. Positive outcomes for both the surrogacy child and the surrogate mother have been reported, including in cases of same-sex male couples and single persons. There is an on-going debate because remuneration does not necessarily involve undue inducement of the surrogate or transformation of the child into a commodity. The right to regret and the doctors’ autonomy are also (...)
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  29.  11
    Ethics, Conflict and Medical Treatment for Children: From Disagreement to Dissensus.David Albert Jones - 2019 - The New Bioethics 25 (1):94-97.
    Volume 25, Issue 1, March 2019, Page 94-97.
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  30.  23
    What Demarks the Metamorphosis of Human Individuals to Posthuman Entities?Michal Pruski - 2019 - The New Bioethics 25 (1):3-23.
    Humans often seek to improve themselves, whether through self-discipline or through the use of science and technology. At some point in the future, techniques might become available that will change humans to such a degree that they might have to be regarded as something other than human: posthuman. This essay tries to define the point at which such a human-to-posthuman metamorphosis may occur. This is achieved by discerning what is it that makes human substance distinct, i.e. what is the human (...)
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  31.  10
    Frankenstein – Annotated for Scientists, Engineers and Creators of All Kinds.Trevor Stammers - 2019 - The New Bioethics 25 (1):97-100.
    Volume 25, Issue 1, March 2019, Page 97-100.
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  32.  41
    Transitional States.Trevor Stammers - 2019 - The New Bioethics 25 (1):1-2.
    Volume 25, Issue 1, March 2019, Page 1-2.
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  33.  19
    Gillick Competence: An Unnecessary Burden.Nigel Zimmermann - 2019 - The New Bioethics 25 (1):78-93.
    This study of the implications of Gillick competence argues it is an unnecessary burden with an unethical foundation. The ethics of adolescent medical decision-making is a fraught area for medical ethics because it deals with the threshold boundaries between childhood and adulthood and Gillick adds a burden upon children and adolescent patients that is unwarranted and through which damage is done to integral human relationships. In light of Gillick, it can be seen that the context of adolescent decision-making and childhood, (...)
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  34.  2
    Legal Punishment, Abortion and the Substance View.Bruce P. Blackshaw - 2019 - The New Bioethics:1-3.
    A response to Henrik Friberg-Fernros' commentary on ‘The Ethics of Killing: Strengthening the Substance View with Time-relative Interests’.
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  35.  15
    The Ethics of Killing: Strengthening the Substance View with Time-Relative Interests.Bruce P. Blackshaw - 2019 - The New Bioethics (Online):1-17.
    The substance view is an account of personhood that regards all human beings as possessing instrinsic value and moral status equivalent to that of an adult human being. Consequently, substance view proponents typically regard abortion as impermissible in most circumstances. The substance view, however, has difficulty accounting for certain intuitions regarding the badness of death for embryos and fetuses, and the wrongness of killing them. Jeff McMahan’s time-relative interest account is designed to cater for such intuitions, and so I present (...)
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