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  1.  6
    Unbinding From Humanity: Nandipha Mntambo’s Europa and the Limits of History and Identity.Ewa Domańska - 2020 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 14 (3):310-336.
    This article shows that the question of “Historical Thinking and the Human” demands expanding the field of the philosophy of history. What I propose is to investigate the issue from two perspectives: firstly, by positioning it in the broader philosophical context, one that increasingly transcends the boundaries of the humanities to enter the realm of the life sciences; and secondly, by drawing on a wider range of analytical material than has usually been the case in classic works in the philosophy (...)
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  2.  8
    Ours Is the Earth: Science and Human History in the Anthropocene.Sheila Jasanoff - 2020 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 14 (3):337-358.
    History at one time drew unproblematically on records produced by human societies about themselves and their doings. Advances in biology and the earth sciences introduced new narrative resources that repositioned the human story in relation to the evolution of all else on the planet, thereby decentering earlier conceptions of time, life, and human agency. This essay reflects on what it means for our understanding of the human that the history of our species has become so intimately entangled with the material (...)
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  3.  26
    Conflicts of Planetary Proportion – A Conversation.Bruno Latour & Dipesh Chakrabarty - 2020 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 14 (3):419-454.
    The introduction of the long-term history of the Earth into the preoccupations of historians has triggered a crisis because it has become impossible to keep the “planet” as one single entity outside of history properly understood. As soon as the planetary intruded into history, it became impossible to keep it as one naturalized background. By problematizing the planetary, Dipesh Chakrabarty has forced philosophers, historians and anthropologists to extend pluralism to the very ground on which history was supposed to unfold. Hence (...)
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  4.  5
    Museums in the Long Now: History in the Geological Age of Humans.Libby Robin - 2020 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 14 (3):359-381.
    History in times of crisis is practical: future action depends on historical framing. Moving beyond “human scales” to include the evolutionary and the geological, and beyond humans to include other species, demands different approaches and new “archives” like ice-cores. This paper considers history in the Long Now, and particularly how museums and big public arts institutions develop new sorts of history through practical story-telling, taking seriously the notion that “the central role of museums [is] both an expression of cultural identity (...)
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  5.  1
    Historical Thinking and the Human: Introduction.Marek Tamm & Zoltán Boldizsár Simon - 2020 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 14 (3):285-309.
    In recent years the age-old question “what is the human?” has acquired a new acuteness and novel dimensions. In introducing the special issue on “Historical Thinking and the Human”, this article argues that there are two main trends behind the contemporary “crisis of human”: ecological transformations, and technological ones. After discussing the respective anthropocenic and technoscientific redefinitions of the human, the paper theorizes three elements in an emerging new historicity of the human: first, the move from a fixed category to (...)
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  6.  5
    Human Flourishing and History: A Religious Imaginary for the Anthropocene.Hava Tirosh-Samuelson - 2020 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 14 (3):382-418.
    The Anthropocene denotes the impact of human activity on Earth systems, resulting in mass extinctions of plant and animal species, pollution of oceans, lakes and rivers, and altering of the atmosphere. The Anthropocene signifies the mass control of nature by humans, the erasure of boundaries between humanity and nature, and the threat to human existence by human-made technology. How can biological humans flourish, if their physical environment, the very condition of their existence, is destroyed? What does it mean to thrive (...)
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  7.  9
    Radical, Sceptical and Liberal Enlightenment.James Alexander - 2020 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 14 (2):257-283.
    We still ask the question ‘What is Enlightenment?’ Every generation seems to offer new and contradictory answers to the question. In the last thirty or so years, the most interesting characterisations of Enlightenment have been by historians. They have told us that there is one Enlightenment, that there are two Enlightenments, that there are many Enlightenments. This has thrown up a second question, ‘How Many Enlightenments?’ In the spirit of collaboration and criticism, I answer both questions by arguing in this (...)
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  8.  8
    Meanings and Understandings in the History of Ideas.Adrian Blau - 2020 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 14 (2):232-256.
    This paper presents a framework of four types of meaning and understanding in the history of political thought and intellectual history. Previous frameworks have overlooked a whole type of meaning – the type often prioritised by political theorists and philosophers. I call this “extended meaning.” Correcting a wrong turn in philosophy of language in the 1950s, I show how extended meaning has robust intellectual foundations, and I illustrate its value for textual interpreters. Even historians often need extended meaning, for example (...)
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  9.  8
    Scientific Concepts as Forward-Looking: How Taxonomic Structure Facilitates Conceptual Development.Corinne L. Bloch-Mullins - 2020 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 14 (2):205-231.
    This paper examines the interplay between conceptual structure and the evolution of scientific concepts, arguing that concepts are fundamentally ‘forward-looking’ constructs. Drawing on empirical studies of similarity and categorization, I explicate the way in which the conceptual taxonomy highlights the ‘relevant respects’ for similarity judgments involved in categorization. I then propose that this taxonomy provides some of the cognitive underpinnings of the ongoing development of scientific concepts. I use the concept synapse to illustrate my proposal, showing how conceptual taxonomy both (...)
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  10.  8
    Editorial: The Philosophy of Intellectual History and Conceptual Change.Jouni-Matti Kuukkanen - 2020 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 14 (2):143-145.
  11.  14
    Editorial: Too Many Books to Read? Then Read This.Jouni-Matti Kuukkanen - 2020 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 14 (1):1-2.
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