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  1.  11
    Self-Consciousness Without an “I”: A Critique of Zahavi’s Account of the Minimal Self.Lilian Alweiss - 2022 - Research in Phenomenology 52 (1):84-119.
    This paper takes Zahavi’s view to task that every conscious experience involves a “minimal sense of self.” Zahavi bases his claim on the observation that experience, even on the pre-reflective level, is not only about the object, but also has a distinctive qualitative aspect which is indicative of the fact that it is for me. It has the quality of what he calls “for-meness” or “mineness.” Against this I argue that there are not two phenomena but only one. On the (...)
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  2.  4
    “As Soon as a Man Comes to Life, He Is Old Enough to Die”: Heidegger and Chapter XX of Der Ackermann Aus Böhmen.Peter Atterton - 2022 - Research in Phenomenology 52 (1):48-67.
    In section 48 of Being and Time, Heidegger quotes from chapter XX of Der Ackermann aus Böhmen, a late medieval prose poem written in Early New High German, circa 1400: “As soon as a man comes to life, he is at once old enough to die.” In this paper, I provide the context for the quotation. I also suggest that Heidegger’s interest in Der Ackermann cannot be explained solely in terms of his believing the poem was the source of the (...)
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  3.  3
    The Question Concerning Literacy: Hatab on Speaking, Reading, and Writing.Scott M. Campbell - 2022 - Research in Phenomenology 52 (1):146-154.
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  4.  3
    Political Hermeneutics and Social Interpretation.Magnus Ferguson - 2022 - Research in Phenomenology 52 (1):137-145.
  5.  1
    Condillac and Derrida: Perception, the Human and Empiricism.Sean Gaston - 2022 - Research in Phenomenology 52 (1):1-22.
    In June 2020, a new work by Derrida on Condillac was published, Le Calcul des langues. This article re-examines Derrida’s readings of Condillac, focusing on the relation between perception and the language of signs; the relation between human knowledge and the animal; and the idealization and limits of empiricism.
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  6.  2
    The Sense of Propulsion: Sartre’s Freedom as Deleuzian Force.Elad Magomedov - 2022 - Research in Phenomenology 52 (1):120-136.
    This paper will revitalize the notion of force in Sartre’s phenomenology by reinterpreting thrown-projection as propulsion. From there, Sartre’s analysis of agency will be explored as regards the constitutive moments pertaining to the dynamics of striving. We will see that such striving relates to Deleuze’s ideas on how bodily forces take consciousness into possession. In the final steps of the analysis, it will turn out that freedom is dependent on a rupture that emerges from self-determination of consciousness, which is itself (...)
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  7.  2
    On Derrida’s Donner le Temps, Volumes I & II: A New Engagement with Heidegger.Adam R. Rosenthal - 2022 - Research in Phenomenology 52 (1):23-47.
    This essay explores the importance of Donner le temps II within the context of Derrida’s writings on Heidegger and the gift. In the first section of the essay, I situate the publication of the latter half of Derrida’s 1978–79 seminar against his writings on the gift generally, beginning in 1968 and ending in 2000. In the second section, I explain how the second volume of Donner le temps relates to the first. In the final three sections of the paper, I (...)
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  8.  3
    The Poetic Way of Thinking.Krzysztof Ziarek - 2022 - Research in Phenomenology 52 (1):68-83.
    Heidegger repeatedly performs the encounter of thinking and poetry, explicitly for the sake of inaugurating a non-metaphysical way of thinking. This transformed thinking is to be poetic and non-conceptual, eschewing the comfort of transparent meaning, the grasping power of concepts, the presentational force of images, or the self-evident correctness of propositional statements. The need for such a non-metaphysical thinking arises historically, at the endpoint of the epoch of the completion of metaphysics, when it comes to roost in the Gestell, the (...)
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