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  1.  11
    Exploitation, Trade Justice, and Corporate Obligations.Brian Berkey - 2022 - Moral Philosophy and Politics 9 (1):11-29.
    In On Trade Justice, Risse and Wollner defend an account of trade justice on which the central requirement, applying to both states and firms, is a requirement of non-exploitation. On their view, trade exploitation consists in ‘power-induced failure of reciprocity’, which generates an unfair distribution of the benefits and burdens associated with trade relationships. In this paper, I argue that while there are many appealing features of Risse and Wollner’s account, their discussion does not articulate and develop the unified picture (...)
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  2. Trade, Exploitation, and the Problem of Unequal Opportunity Costs.Andreas Cassee - 2022 - Moral Philosophy and Politics 9 (1):31-50.
    This paper assesses the ‘power-induced failure of reciprocity’ account of exploitation in the domain of trade. I argue that its proponents face a dilemma. Either the cost variable of reciprocity is understood to include opportunity costs. Then, the account implausibly implies that those with more valuable outside options should get a larger part of the overall benefits of cooperation. Or the cost variable is understood to exclude opportunity costs. Then, the account has awkward implications in cases where direct costs and (...)
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  3.  6
    On Whose Terms? Power and Exploitation in Trade.Frank J. Garcia & Peter Dietsch - 2022 - Moral Philosophy and Politics 9 (1):1-10.
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  4.  1
    Moving Beyond the Individualist Paradigm? Risse and Wollner on Non-Agential Exploitation.Katla Heðinsdóttir - 2022 - Moral Philosophy and Politics 9 (1):51-67.
    Most philosophical examinations of the concept of exploitation center on analyzing two-party interactions between individuals. Mathias Risse and Gabriel Wollner introduce an account of exploitation that seeks to transcend this ‘individualist paradigm’ in three ways: Through exploitation of and by agential groups, of or by non-agential groups and by social structures. In this paper, I argue that while the concepts of non-individual and structural exploitation do offer each their way of transcending or revising the individualist paradigm, the most ambitious and (...)
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  5.  1
    When (Not) to Trade with Autocrats: Complicity, Exploitation, and Human Rights.Kevin K. W. Ip - 2022 - Moral Philosophy and Politics 9 (1):69-88.
    Transnational trade is at the heart of the global economy. Trade relations often transcend both ideological divides and regime type. Trading with autocratic regimes, however, raises significant moral issues. In their recent book, On Trade Justice, Mathias Risse and Gabriel Wollner argue that trade with autocratic regimes is morally permissible only under a very limited set of circumstances. This article discusses the morally permissible trade policies that liberal democracies ought to adopt toward autocratic regimes. Liberal democracies trading with autocratic regimes (...)
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  6. What the Trade Pioneers Missed: Money.Aaron James - 2022 - Moral Philosophy and Politics 9 (1):89-106.
    Matias Risse and Gabriel Wollner’s On Trade Justice largely neglects the role of money and central banking in ‘trade fairness.’ This article rehearses why J. M. Keynes thought money and global central banking matters for national capacity, and suggests that this helps answer Risse and Wollner’s chief objection to Aaron James’s Fairness in Practice.
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  7. Subsidies, Relocations, and Social Justice.Sylvie Loriaux - 2022 - Moral Philosophy and Politics 9 (1):107-124.
    This article examines Risse and Wollner’s discussion and rejection of several strategies a) in favour of developed countries subsidising their producers, and b) against the relocation of firms operating on their territory. It argues that their critical review of these strategies remains incomplete and therefore not decisive. It starts by bringing into relief two blind spots in their moral assessment of subsidies. The first concerns the imperfect nature of the general duties of global justice they focus on; the second concerns (...)
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  8.  1
    On Trade and Exploitation.Pietro Maffettone - 2022 - Moral Philosophy and Politics 9 (1):125-146.
    In this essay I critically engage with Mathias Risse and Gabriel Wollner’s book On Trade Justice: A Philosophical Plea for a New Global Deal. I sketch their general view of the concept of exploitation and of trade exploitation more specifically. I then suggest that, contra Risse and Wollner, exploitation belongs to non-ideal theory. In addition, I argue that Risse and Wollner have not shown that the WTO is exploitative, and argue that their account of fair wages suffers from a number (...)
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  9. On Trade Justice, Power and Institutions – Some Questions for Risse and Wollner.Oisin Suttle - 2022 - Moral Philosophy and Politics 9 (1):147-171.
    While Risse and Wollner make an important contribution to theorising global justice and trade, I identify certain concerns with their approach and suggest an alternative that addresses these. First, I query their emphasis on subjection to the trade regime as a morally salient feature, suggesting their argument trades on an ambiguity, and fails to connect the trade regime, as a trigger, with their preferred account of trade-justice-as-non-exploitation. Second, I examine their treatment of the WTO, how they understand international organisations as (...)
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