Moral Philosophy and Politics

ISSNs: 2194-5616, 2194-5624

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  1.  3
    Legitimacy Revisited: Moral Power and Civil Disobedience.Arthur Isak Applbaum - 2024 - Moral Philosophy and Politics 11 (1):87-112.
    In Legitimacy: The Right to Rule in a Wanton World, I offer both a conceptual analysis of legitimacy, the power-liability view, and a substantive moral theory, the free group agency view. Here, I defend my account against three challenges brought by Kjarsten Mikalsen. First, though I argue that conceptual analysis should not prematurely close open moral questions, it is not my view that conceptual analysis must have no substantive implications. Second, though I acknowledge that free group agency ordinarily supports a (...)
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  2.  13
    Does the Free Group Agency Account of Legitimacy Require Democracy?Palle Bech-Pedersen & Finn Haberkost - 2024 - Moral Philosophy and Politics 11 (1):51-61.
    In this critical comment, we argue that nondemocratic, but decent regimes fail to constitute legitimate governance under Applbaum’s free group agency account. To make this case, we first introduce the three principles of liberty, equality and agency that Applbaum takes to flow directly from his free agency conception of legitimacy. Against this backdrop, we discuss Applbaum’s claim that a nondemocratic regime along the lines of a Rawlsian decent consultation hierarchy could meet the threshold of legitimacy. Contrary to this suggestion, we (...)
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  3.  4
    Introduction to Special Issue.Matthias Brinkmann & Anthony Taylor - 2024 - Moral Philosophy and Politics 11 (1):1-6.
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  4.  12
    Torture and Trolleys: Accepting the Nearly Absolute Wrongness of Philanthropic Torture of a Perpetrator.David Jensen - 2024 - Moral Philosophy and Politics 11 (1):141-167.
    One potentially morally justified use of torture is found in philanthropic torture of a perpetrator (PTP): scenarios in which a perpetrator has instigated significant pending suffering against innocents and in which the suffering can be prevented by means of the perpetrator’s cooperation. These situations involve a clash of two intuitions: that torture is in some strong and obvious sense absolutely morally wrong, and that torture or harm of an immoral perpetrator may be permissible to prevent equally abhorrent, if not greater, (...)
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  5.  28
    Persons, Agents and Wantons.Matthew Lampert - 2024 - Moral Philosophy and Politics 11 (1):7-27.
    In this essay, I argue that any competent group agent must be a wanton. The impetus for this claim is an argument Arthur Applbaum makes in Legitimacy: The Right to Rule in a Wanton World that a formal institution (in this case, a government) can, under the right conditions, function as a free moral group agent. I begin by explaining Harry Frankfurt’s classic account of wantonism—not just for the benefit of readers who might not be familiar with the concept, but (...)
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  6.  24
    Do Promises Towards Fossil Fuel Owners Matter?Rutger Lazou - 2024 - Moral Philosophy and Politics 11 (1):169-194.
    While the energy transition is needed more than ever, for some agents it brings significant losses. This article investigates whether fossil fuel owners could refer to promises to avoid having their assets stranded. It explains how authors, in the context of just transitions, have argued for the normative relevance of Rawlsian legitimate expectations, which refer to promissory entitlements. However, it argues that the normative relevance of promises towards fossil fuel owners is limited, because there are only few promises about what (...)
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  7.  25
    Political Legitimacy: What’s Wrong with the Power-Liability View?Kjartan Mikalsen - 2024 - Moral Philosophy and Politics 11 (1):29-50.
    In this paper, I take issue with Arthur Isak Applbaum’s power-liability view of political legitimacy. In contrast to the traditional view that legitimate rule entails a moral duty to obey, here called the right-duty view, Applbaum argues that political legitimacy is a moral power that entails moral liability for the subjects of political rule. According to Applbaum, the power-liability view helps us explain how responsible citizens in some cases can act contrary to law while still recognizing the claims of law. (...)
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  8.  11
    The Democratic Virtues of Randomized Trials.Ana Tanasoca & Andrew Leigh - 2024 - Moral Philosophy and Politics 11 (1):113-140.
    Democratic alternation in power involves uncontrolled policy experiments. One party is elected on one policy platform that it then implements. Things may go well or badly. When another party is elected in its place, it implements a different policy. In imposing policies on the whole community, parties in effect conduct non-randomized trials without control groups. In this paper, we endorse the general idea of policy experimentation but we also argue that it can be done better by deploying in policymaking randomized (...)
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