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  1.  6
    The Value-Ladenness of Transparency in Science: Lessons From Lyme Disease.Kevin C. Elliott - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 88:1-9.
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  2.  4
    Value Disputes in Urban Ecological Restoration: Lessons From the Chicago Wilderness.Ben Almassi - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 87:93-100.
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  3.  6
    Quantum Reality: A Pragmaticized Neo-Kantian Approach.Florian J. Boge - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 87:101-113.
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  4.  1
    The Role of Purifying Selection in the Origin and Maintenance of Complex Function.Tyler D. P. Brunet, W. Ford Doolittle & Joseph P. Bielawski - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 87:125-135.
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  5.  8
    Animal Deception and the Content of Signals.Don Fallis & Peter J. Lewis - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 87:114-124.
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  6. Does Environmental Science Crowd Out Non-Epistemic Values?Kinley Gillette, Stephen Andrew Inkpen & C. Tyler DesRoches - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 87:81-92.
  7.  9
    Distinctively Mathematical Explanation and the Problem of Directionality: A Quasi-Erotetic Solution.Travis L. Holmes - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 87:13-21.
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  8.  6
    Interpreting the Wigner–Eckart Theorem.Josh Hunt - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 87:28-43.
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  9.  6
    Curie’s Principle and Causal Graphs.David Kinney - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 87:22-27.
    Curie’s Principle says that any symmetry property of a cause must be found in its effect. In this article, I consider Curie’s Principle from the point of view of graphical causal models, and demonstrate that, under one definition of a symmetry transformation, the causal modeling framework does not require anything like Curie’s Principle to be true. On another definition of a symmetry transformation, the graphical causal modeling formalism does imply a version of Curie’s Principle. These results yield a better understanding (...)
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  10.  3
    Improving Philosophical Dialogue Interventions to Better Resolve Problematic Value Pluralism in Collaborative Environmental Science.Bethany K. Laursen, Chad Gonnerman & Stephen J. Crowley - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 87:54-71.
    Environmental problems often outstrip the abilities of any single scientist to understand, much less address them. As a result, collaborations within, across, and beyond the environmental sciences are an increasingly important part of the environmental science landscape. Here, we explore an insufficiently recognized and particularly challenging barrier to collaborative environmental science: value pluralism, the presence of non-trivial differences in the values that collaborators bring to bear on project decisions. We argue that resolving the obstacles posed by value pluralism to collaborative (...)
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  11.  4
    Accentuate the Negative: Locating Possibility in Darwin’s ‘Long Argument’.James G. Lennox - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 87:147-157.
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  12.  13
    ‘Species’ Without Species.Aaron Novick & W. Ford Doolittle - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 87:72-80.
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  13.  4
    Understanding the Role of Wrongdoing in Technological Disasters: Utilizing Ecofeminist Philosophy to Examine Commemoration.Sarah M. Roe & Elyse Zavar - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 87:158-167.
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  14.  13
    The Five Problems of Irreversibility.Michael te Vrugt - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 87:136-146.
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  15.  10
    Chomsky in the Playground: Idealization in Generative Linguistics.Giulia Terzian - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 87:1-12.
  16.  42
    Spinoza on the Resistance of Bodies.Galen Barry - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 86:56-67.
    People attribute resistance to bodies in Spinoza's physics. It's not always clear what they mean when they do this, or whether they are entitled to. This article clarifies what it would mean, and examines the evidence for attributing resistance. The verdict: there's some evidence, but not nearly as much as people think.
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  17.  5
    The Metaphysical Challenge of Loop Quantum Gravity.Martin Calamari - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 86:68-83.
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  18.  8
    Beyond Descriptive Accuracy: The Central Dogma of Molecular Biology in Scientific Practice.M. Polo Camacho - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 86:20-26.
    There is no denying the Central Dogma’s impact on the biological sciences. Since the Dogma’s formulation by Francis Crick in 1958, however, many have debated the Dogma’s empirical adequacy. My aim is to move beyond these discussions, and instead consider the Central Dogma’s significance to contemporary biological practice. To do this, I consider four distinct approaches for determining the non-descriptive methodological significance of a scientific principle. I argue that these approaches fail to vindicate the Central Dogma, and that, under many (...)
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  19.  1
    What Induction is (and What It Should Not Be): A Concepts-Centric Perspective on Norton’s Radium Chloride Example.Pat Corvini - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 86:27-34.
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  20.  17
    No-Go Theorems: What Are They Good For?Radin Dardashti - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 86:47-55.
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  21.  4
    Values in Early-Stage Climate Engineering: The Ethical Implications of “Doing the Research”.Jude Galbraith - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 86:103-113.
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  22.  1
    Existence of Macroscopic Spatial Superpositions in Collapse Theories.Shan Gao - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 86:1-5.
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  23.  6
    Kant, Causation and Laws of Nature.James Hutton - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 86:93-102.
    In the Second Analogy, Kant argues that every event has a cause. It remains disputed what this conclusion amounts to. Does Kant argue only for the Weak Causal Principle that every event has some cause, or for the Strong Causal Principle that every event is produced according to a universal causal law? Existing interpretations have assumed that, by Kant’s lights, there is a substantive difference between the two. I argue that this is false. Kant holds that the concept of cause (...)
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  24.  2
    Heritable Changeability: Epimutation and the Legacy of Negative Definition in Epigenetic Concepts.Anne Le Goff, Patrick Allard & Hannah Landecker - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 86:35-46.
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  25.  9
    Structuralism and the Conformity of Mathematics and Nature.Noah Stemeroff - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 86:84-92.
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  26.  5
    Erratum to “The State is Not Abolished, It Withers Away: How Quantum Field Theory Became a Theory of Scattering” [Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 60 (2017) 46–80]. [REVIEW]Alexander S. Blum - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 85:220.
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  27.  1
    Causation and Gravitation in George Cheyne's Newtonian Natural Philosophy.Patrick J. Connolly - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 85:145-154.
    This paper analyzes the metaphysical system developed in Cheyne’s Philosophical Principles of Religion. Cheyne was an early proponent of Newtonianism and tackled several philosophical questions raised by Newton’s work. The most pressing of these concerned the causal origin of gravitational attraction. Cheyne rejected the occasionalist explanations offered by several of his contemporaries in favor of a model on which God delegated special causal powers to bodies. Additionally, he developed an innovative approach to divine conservation. This allowed him to argue that (...)
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  28.  5
    Colligation in Modelling Practices: From Whewell’s Tides to the San Francisco Bay Model.Claudia Cristalli & Julia Sánchez-Dorado - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 85:1-15.
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  29.  3
    A Prototypical Conceptualization of Mechanisms.Bryon Cunningham - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 85:79-91.
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  30.  9
    Inference to the Best Explanation and Norton's Material Theory of Induction.Kevin Davey - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 85:137-144.
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  31.  1
    How (Not) to Understand Weak Measurements of Velocities.Johannes Fankhauser & Patrick M. Dürr - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 85:16-29.
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  32.  9
    Corrigendum to “The ‘Kantian Principle’ for Natural History and its Historical Significance Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Science” [64 (2017) 22–27]. [REVIEW]Andrea Gambarotto - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 85:219.
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  33.  3
    Corrigendum to “Vital Forces and Organization: Philosophy of Nature and Biology in Karl Friedrich Kielmeyer” [Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Science 48 (2014) 12–20]. [REVIEW]Andrea Gambarotto - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 85:218.
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  34.  9
    The Death of the Cortical Column? Patchwork Structure and Conceptual Retirement in Neuroscientific Practice.Philipp Haueis - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 85:101-113.
    In 1981, David Hubel and Torsten Wiesel received the Nobel Prize for their research on cortical columns—vertical bands of neurons with similar functional properties. This success led to the view that “cortical column” refers to the basic building block of the mammalian neocortex. Since the 1990s, however, critics questioned this building block picture of “cortical column” and debated whether this concept is useless and should be replaced with successor concepts. This paper inquires which experimental results after 1981 challenged the building (...)
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  35.  7
    Structure, Scale and Emergence.Robin Findlay Hendry - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 85:44-53.
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  36.  37
    The Causal Structure of Natural Kinds.Olivier Lemeire - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 85:200-207.
    One primary goal for metaphysical theories of natural kinds is to account for their epistemic fruitfulness. According to cluster theories of natural kinds, this epistemic fruitfulness is grounded in the regular and stable co- occurrence of a broad set of properties. In this paper, I defend the view that such a cluster theory is insufficient to adequately account for the epistemic fruitfulness of kinds. I argue that cluster theories can indeed account for the projectibility of natural kinds, but not for (...)
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  37.  79
    (Mis)Understanding Scientific Disagreement: Success Versus Pursuit-Worthiness in Theory Choice.Eli I. Lichtenstein - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 85:166-175.
    Scientists often diverge widely when choosing between research programs. This can seem to be rooted in disagreements about which of several theories, competing to address shared questions or phenomena, is currently the most epistemically or explanatorily valuable—i.e. most successful. But many such cases are actually more directly rooted in differing judgments of pursuit-worthiness, concerning which theory will be best down the line, or which addresses the most significant data or questions. Using case studies from 16th-century astronomy and 20th-century geology and (...)
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  38.  2
    Patient Participation in the Clinical Encounter and Clinical Practice Guidelines: The Case of Patients’ Participation in a GRADEd World.Mathew Mercuri, Brian S. Baigrie & Amiram Gafni - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 85:192-199.
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  39.  16
    Author's Responses.John D. Norton - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 85:114-126.
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  40.  5
    Robustness Reasoning in Climate Model Comparisons.Ryan O’Loughlin - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 85:34-43.
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  41.  1
    Transparency and Secrecy in Citizen Science: Lessons From Herping.Aleta Quinn - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 85:208-217.
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  42.  8
    How Uncertainty Can Save Measurement From Circularity and Holism.Sophie Ritson & Kent Staley - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 85:155-165.
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  43.  11
    Introduction.Elay Shech & Wendy S. Parker - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 85:30-33.
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  44.  11
    Synthetic Biology as a Technoscience: The Case of Minimal Genomes and Essential Genes.Massimiliano Simons - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 85:127-136.
    This article examines how minimal genome research mobilizes philosophical concepts such as minimality and essentiality. Following a historical approach the article aims to uncover what function this terminology plays and which problems are raised by them. Specifically, four historical moments are examined, linked to the work of Harold J. Morowitz, Mitsuhiro Itaya, Eugene Koonin and Arcady Mushegian, and J. Craig Venter. What this survey shows is a historical shift away from historical questions about life or descriptive questions about specific organisms (...)
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  45.  26
    Permissible Idealizations for the Purpose of Prediction.Michael Strevens - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 85:92-100.
    Every model leaves out or distorts some factors that are causally connected to its target phenomenon -- the phenomenon that it seeks to predict or explain. If we want to make predictions, and we want to base decisions on those predictions, what is it safe to omit or to simplify, and what ought a causal model to describe fully and correctly? A schematic answer: the factors that matter are those that make a difference to the target phenomenon. There are several (...)
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  46.  4
    Taking Up Statistical Thermodynamics: Equilibrium Fluctuations and Irreversibility.Giovanni Valente - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 85:176-184.
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  47.  15
    On Value-Laden Science.Zina B. Ward - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 85:54-62.
    Philosophical work on values in science is held back by widespread ambiguity about how values bear on sci entific choices. Here, I disambiguate several ways in which a choice can be value-laden and show that this disambiguation has the potential to solve and dissolve philosophical problems about values in science. First, I characterize four ways in which values relate to choices: values can motivate, justify, cause, or be impacted by the choices we make. Next, I put my proposed taxonomy to (...)
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  48.  9
    Coincidence and Reproducibility in the EHT Black Hole Experiment.Galina Weinstein - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 85:63-78.
    This paper discusses some philosophical aspects related to the recent publication of the experimental results of the 2017 black hole experiment, namely the first image of the supermassive black hole at the center of galaxy M87. In this paper I present a philosophical analysis of the 2017 Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) black hole experiment. I first present Hacking’s philosophy of experimentation. Hacking gives his taxonomy of elements of laboratory science and distinguishes a list of elements. I show that the EHT (...)
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  49.  9
    The Roots of the Silver Tree: Boyle, Alchemy, and Teleology.Jennifer Whyte - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 85:185-191.
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  50.  7
    Francis Galton’s Regression Towards Mediocrity and the Stability of Types.Adam Krashniak & Ehud Lamm - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 81:6-19.
    A prevalent narrative locates the discovery of the statistical phenomenon of regression to the mean in the work of Francis Galton. It is claimed that after 1885, Galton came to explain the fact that offspring deviated less from the mean value of the population than their parents did as a population-level statistical phenomenon and not as the result of the processes of inheritance. Arguing against this claim, we show that Galton did not explain regression towards mediocrity statistically, and did not (...)
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