Year:

  1.  8
    Knowledge Transfer Without Knowledge? The Case of Agentive Metaphors in Biology.Ariane Castellane & Cédric Paternotte - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 72:49-58.
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  2.  9
    Rip It Up and Start Again: The Rejection of a Characterization of a Phenomenon.David Colaço - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 72:32-40.
    In this paper, I investigate the nature of empirical findings that provide evidence for the characterization of a scientific phenomenon, and the defeasible nature of this evidence. To do so, I explore an exemplary instance of the rejection of a characterization of a scientific phenomenon: memory transfer. I examine the reason why the characterization of memory transfer was rejected, and analyze how this rejection tied to researchers’ failures to resolve experimental issues relating to replication and confounds. I criticize the presentation (...)
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  3.  2
    Constructing Dystopian Experience: A Neurath-Cartwrightian Approach to the Philosophy of Social Technology.Ivan Ferreira da Cunha - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 72:41-48.
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  4.  6
    The Role of Psychology in Behavioral Economics: The Case of Social Preferences.Chiara Lisciandra - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 72:11-21.
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  5.  7
    Microbes, Mathematics, and Models.Maureen A. O'Malley & Emily C. Parke - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 72:1-10.
    Microbial model systems have a long history of fruitful use in fields that include evolution and ecology. In order to develop further insight into modelling practice, we examine how the competitive exclusion and coexistence of competing species have been modelled mathematically and materially over the course of a long research history. In particular, we investigate how microbial models of these dynamics interact with mathematical or computational models of the same phenomena. Our cases illuminate the ways in which microbial systems and (...)
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  6.  10
    Mechanisms, the Interventionist Theory, and the Ability to Use Causal Relationships.Georgie Statham - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 72:22-31.
    In the area of social science, in particular, although we have developed methods for reliably discovering the existence of causal relationships, we are not very good at using these to design effective social policy. Cartwright argues that in order to improve our ability to use causal relationships, it is essential to develop a theory of causation that makes explicit the connections between the nature of causation, our best methods for discovering causal relationships, and the uses to which these are put. (...)
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  7.  3
    History to Reckon With.Simon Werrett - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 72:59-62.
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  8.  6
    The Stage on Which Our Ingenious Play is Performed: Kant's Epistemology of Weltkenntnis.Silvia De Bianchi - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 71:58-66.
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  9.  19
    Introduction to Kant's Philosophy of Science: Bridging the Gap Between the Natural and the Human Sciences.Silvia De Bianchi & Katharina Kraus - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 71:1-5.
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  10.  19
    The Problem of Grounding Natural Modality in Kant's Account of Empirical Laws of Nature.Kristina Engelhard - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 71:24-34.
  11.  7
    A Kantian Account of Mathematical Modelling and the Rationality of Scientific Theory Change: The Role of the Equivalence Principle in the Development of General Relativity.Jonathan Everett - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 71:45-57.
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  12.  11
    Kant and the Scope of the Analytic Method.Brigitte Falkenburg - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 71:13-23.
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  13.  23
    The Soul as the ‘Guiding Idea’ of Psychology: Kant on Scientific Psychology, Systematicity, and the Idea of the Soul.Katharina T. Kraus - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 71:77-88.
    This paper examines whether Kant’s Critical philosophy offers resources for a conception of empirical psychology as a theoretical science in its own right, rather than as a part of applied moral philosophy or of pragmatic anthropology. In contrast to current interpretations, this paper argues that Kant’s conception of inner experience provides relevant resources for the theoretical foundation of scientific psychology, in particular with respect to its subject matter and its methodological presuppositions. Central to this interpretation is the regulative idea of (...)
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  14.  5
    Kant and the Scope of Analogy in the Life Sciences.Hein van den Berg - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 71:67-76.
    In the present paper I investigate the role that analogy plays in eighteenth-century biology and in Kant’s philosophy of biology. I will argue that according to Kant, biology, as it was practiced in the eighteenth century, is fundamentally based on analogical reflection. However, precisely because biology is based on analogical reflection, biology cannot be a proper science. I provide two arguments for this interpretation. First, I argue that although analogical reflection is, according to Kant, necessary to comprehend the nature of (...)
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  15.  6
    Towards a Research Program in Kantian Positive Psychology.Patrick R. Frierson - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 71:89-98.
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  16. Maimon's Criticism of Kant's Doctrine of Mathematical Cognition and the Possibility of Metaphysics as a Science.Hernán Pringe - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 71:35-44.
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  17.  5
    Earthquake Prediction, Biological Clocks, and the Cold War Psy-Ops: Using Animals as Seismic Sensors in the 1970s California.Elena Aronova - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 70:50-57.
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  18.  2
    Re-Situating Fieldwork and Re-Narrating Disciplinary History in Global Mega-Geomorphology.Etienne S. Benson - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 70:28-37.
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  19. Experiencing Deep and Global Currents at a ‘Prototypical Strait’, 1870s and 1980s.Lino Camprubí - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 70:6-17.
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  20.  1
    The Scales of Experience: Introduction to the Special Issue Experiencing the Global Environment.Lino Camprubí & Philipp Lehmann - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 70:1-5.
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  21.  8
    Human Bodies as Chemical Sensors: A History of Biomonitoring for Environmental Health and Regulation.Angela N. H. Creager - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 70:70-81.
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  22.  1
    Can Animals Predict Earthquakes?: Bio-Sentinels as Seismic Sensors in Communist China and Beyond.Fa-ti Fan - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 70:58-69.
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  23. Average Rainfall and the Play of Colors:Colonial Experience and Global Climate Data.Philipp Lehmann - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 70:38-49.
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  24. Experiential and Cosmopolitan Knowledge: The Transcontinental Field Practices of the U.S. Bureau of Biological Survey.Jeremy Vetter - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 70:18-27.
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  25.  4
    Afterward: Humboldt Was Right.M. Norton Wise - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 70:82-86.
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  26.  2
    How to Be Rational About Empirical Success in Ongoing Science: The Case of the Quantum Nose and its Critics.Ann-Sophie Barwich - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 69:40-51.
    Empirical success is a central criterion for scientific decision-making. Yet its understanding in philosophical studies of science deserves renewed attention: Should philosophers think differently about the advancement of science when they deal with the uncertainty of outcome in ongoing research in comparison with historical episodes? This paper argues that normative appeals to empirical success in the evaluation of competing scientific explanations can result in unreliable conclusions, especially when we are looking at the changeability of direction in ongoing investigations. The challenges (...)
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  27. Cartesian Critters Can't Remember.Devin Sanchez Curry - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 69:72-85.
    Descartes held the following view of declarative memory: to remember is to reconstruct an idea that you intellectually recognize as a reconstruction. Descartes countenanced two overarching varieties of declarative memory. To have an intellectual memory is to intellectually reconstruct a universal idea that you recognize as a reconstruction, and to have a sensory memory is to neurophysiologically reconstruct a particular idea that you recognize as a reconstruction. Sensory remembering is thus a capacity of neither ghosts nor machines, but only of (...)
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  28.  5
    Natural Classification and Pierre Duhem's Historical Work: Which Relationships?Sonia Maria Dion - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 69:34-39.
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  29.  10
    Inductive Reasoning in the Context of Discovery: Analogy as an Experimental Stratagem in the History and Philosophy of Science.Amy A. Fisher - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 69:23-33.
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  30.  34
    Scientists as Experts: A Distinct Role?Torbjørn Gundersen - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 69:52-59.
    The role of scientists as experts is crucial to public policymaking. However, the expert role is contested and unsettled in both public and scholarly discourse. In this paper, I provide a systematic account of the role of scientists as experts in policymaking by examining whether there are any normatively relevant differences between this role and the role of scientists as researchers. Two different interpretations can be given of how the two roles relate to each other. The separability view states that (...)
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  31.  2
    Five Chances in Evolution.Carlos Mariscal & Alexander Lerner - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 69:97-100.
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  32.  9
    The Whewell-Mill Debate on Predictions, From Mill's Point of View.Cornelis Menke - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 69:60-71.
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  33.  5
    Émilie Du Ch'telet's Interpretation of the Laws of Motion in the Light of 18th Century Mechanics.Andrea Reichenberger - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 69:1-11.
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  34.  2
    Schelling's Method of Darstellung: Presenting Nature Through Experiment.Jelscha Schmid - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 69:12-22.
    Philosophies after Kant maybe more than ever, were confronted with a particular epistemic problem: how can representations correspond with the objects they refer to, that is, how is knowledge possible? Against Kant’s negative solution of the problem, proponents of German idealisms sought to establish a philosophical method that would close the gulf between what our concepts and the world they try to grasp. In his writings on a philosophy of nature, the young Schelling put forward methodological solution, which in interesting (...)
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  35.  2
    What is Cultural History for History of Science Today? Perspectives, Challenges, Concerns.Stéphane Van Damme - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 69:90-96.
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  36.  22
    A New Twist to the No Miracles Argument for the Success of Science.K. Brad Wray - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 69:86-89.
    J. D. Trout has recently developed a new defense of scientific realism, a new version of the No Miracles Argument. I critically evaluate Trout’s novel defense of realism. I argue that Trout’s argument for scientific realism and the related explanation for the success of science are self-defeating. In the process of arguing against the traditional realist strategies for explaining the success of science, he inadvertently undermines his own argument.
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  37.  36
    Cognition Wars.Fred Adams - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 68:20-30.
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  38.  16
    Multiple Realization and Multiple “Ways” of Realization: A Progress Report.Kenneth Aizawa - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 68:3-9.
    One might have thought that if something has two or more distinct realizations, then that thing is multiply realized. Nevertheless, some philosophers have claimed that two or more distinct realizations do not amount to multiple realization, unless those distinct realizations amount to multiple “ways” of realizing the thing. Corey Maley, Gualtiero Piccinini, Thomas Polger, and Lawrence Shapiro are among these philosophers. Unfortunately, they do not explain why multiple realization requires multiple “ways” of realizing. More significantly, their efforts to articulate multiple (...)
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  39. The Realizers and Vehicles of Mental Representation.Zoe Drayson - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 68:80-87.
    The neural vehicles of mental representation play an explanatory role in cognitive psychology that their realizers do not. In this paper, I argue that the individuation of realizers as vehicles of representation restricts the sorts of explanations in which they can participate. I illustrate this with reference to Rupert’s (2011) claim that representational vehicles can play an explanatory role in psychology in virtue of their quantity or proportion. I propose that such quantity-based explanatory claims can apply only to realizers and (...)
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  40.  7
    Physicalism, Realization, and Structure.Gary Fuller - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 68:31-36.
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  41.  9
    Realizability and the Varieties of Explanation.Philippe Huneman - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 68:37-50.
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  42.  16
    Integrating Mechanistic Explanations Through Epistemic Perspectives.Lena Kästner - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 68:68-79.
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  43. Saving the Mutual Manipulability Account of Constitutive Relevance.Beate Krickel - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 68:58-67.
    Constitutive mechanistic explanations are said to refer to mechanisms that constitute the phenomenon-to-be-explained. The most prominent approach of how to understand this constitution relation is Carl Craver’s mutual manipulability approach to constitutive relevance. Recently, the mutual manipulability approach has come under attack (Leuridan 2012; Baumgartner and Gebharter 2015; Romero 2015; Harinen 2014; Casini and Baumgartner 2016). Roughly, it is argued that this approach is inconsistent because it is spelled out in terms of interventionism (which is an approach to causation), whereas (...)
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  44.  11
    Introduction: Multiple Realizability and Levels of Reality.Alex Manafu - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 68:1-2.
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  45.  25
    In Defense of Interventionist Solutions to Exclusion.Thomas W. Polger, Lawrence A. Shapiro & Reuben Stern - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 68:51-57.
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  46.  17
    Reduction Redux.Lawrence Shapiro - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 68:10-19.
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  47.  11
    A Role for Spatiotemporal Scales in Modeling.Marina Baldissera Pacchetti - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 67:14-21.
    Bogen and Woodward’s distinction between data and phenomena raises the need to understand the structure of the data-to-phenomena and theory-to-phenomena inferences. I suggest that one way to study the structure of these inferences is to analyze the role of the assumptions involved in the inferences: What kind of assumptions are they? How do these assumptions contribute to the practice of identifying phenomena? In this paper, using examples from atmospheric dynamics, I develop an account of the practice of identifying the target (...)
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  48.  4
    Heuristic Analogy in Ars Conjectandi : From Archimedes' De Circuli Dimensione to Bernoulli's Theorem.Daniel G. Campos - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 67:44-53.
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  49.  15
    The Naturalism of the Sciences.Gregory W. Dawes & Tiddy Smith - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 67:22-31.
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  50.  29
    A Reply to Craver and Povich on the Directionality of Distinctively Mathematical Explanations.Marc Lange - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 67:85-88.
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  51.  15
    What Does Interdisciplinarity Look Like in Practice: Mapping Interdisciplinarity and its Limits in the Environmental Sciences.Miles MacLeod & Michiru Nagatsu - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 67:74-84.
    In this paper we take a close look at current interdisciplinary modeling practices in the environmental sciences, and suggest that closer attention needs to be paid to the nature of scientific practices when investigating and planning interdisciplinarity. While interdisciplinarity is often portrayed as a medium of novel and transformative methodological work, current modeling strategies in the environmental sciences are conservative, avoiding methodological conflict, while confining interdisciplinary interactions to a relatively small set of pre-existing modeling frameworks and strategies (a process we (...)
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  52.  7
    Leibniz on the Requisites of an Exact Arithmetical Quadrature.Federico Raffo Quintana - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 67:65-73.
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  53.  12
    Realism on the Rocks: Novel Success and James Hutton's Theory of the Earth.Thomas Rossetter - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 67:1-13.
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  54.  9
    A Coherentist Conception of Ad Hoc Hypotheses.Samuel Schindler - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 67:54-64.
    What does it mean for a hypothesis to be ad hoc? One prominent account has it that ad hoc hypotheses have no independent empirical support. Others have viewed ad hoc judgements as subjective. Here I critically review both of these views and defend my own Coherentist Conception of Ad hocness by working out its conceptual and descriptive attractions.
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  55.  17
    Chance, Determinism and the Classical Theory of Probability.Anubav Vasudevan - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 67:32-43.
  56.  24
    “What is Living and What is Dead” in Materialism?John H. Zammito - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 67:89-96.
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  57.  11
    Kant on Science and Normativity.Alix Cohen - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 1:6-12.
    The aim of this paper is to explore Kant’s account of normativity through the prism of the distinction between the natural and the human sciences. Although the pragmatic orientation of the human sciences is often defined in contrast with the theoretical orientation of the natural sciences, I show that they are in fact regulated by one and the same norm, namely reason’s demand for autonomy.
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  58.  84
    Should Scientific Realists Embrace Theoretical Conservatism?Finnur Dellsén - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A.
    A prominent type of scientific realism holds that some important parts of our best current scientific theories are at least approximately true. According to such realists, radically distinct alternatives to these theories or theory-parts are unlikely to be approximately true. Thus one might be tempted to argue, as the prominent anti-realist Kyle Stanford recently did, that realists of this kind have little or no reason to encourage scientists to attempt to identify and develop theoretical alternatives that are radically distinct from (...)
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  59.  10
    How Could Models Possibly Provide How-Possibly Explanations?Philippe Verreault-Julien - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A.
    One puzzle concerning highly idealized models is whether they explain. Some suggest they provide so-called ‘how-possibly explanations’. However, this raises an important question about the nature of how-possibly explanations, namely what distinguishes them from ‘normal’, or how-actually, explanations? I provide an account of how-possibly explanations that clarifies their nature in the context of solving the puzzle of model-based explanation. I argue that the modal notions of actuality and possibility provide the relevant dividing lines between how-possibly and how-actually explanations. Whereas how-possibly (...)
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